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Storms Pound Tulsa County

The clean-up is underway from yesterday’s afternoon storms. Strong winds flipped two small planes at Jones Riverside. No one was injured. Trees were downed in west Tulsa and the awning ripped from a shopping center in Prattville. PSO had 20,000 customers off line at one-point. Most have had their power restored.

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Tulsa Fire

AG Wants to Thaw Cold Cases

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter says he will push for legislation next year that requires local law enforcement to enter data from cold cases involving missing or unidentified persons into a national database. Hunter announced his plan Thursday, flanked by family members of a missing Tulsa woman whose case was solved when a relative linked her disappearance to the discovery of a body in Muskogee County. Vicki Curl's mother, Francine Frost, disappeared from a Tulsa grocery store in 1981...

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Politics Of Wildfires: Biggest Battle Is In California's Capital

As California's enormous wildfires continue to set records for the second year in a row, state lawmakers are scrambling to close gaps in state law that could help curb future fires, or make the difference between life and death once a blaze breaks out. While the biggest political battle in Sacramento is focused on utility liability laws , lawmakers are also rushing to change state laws around forest management and emergency alerts before the legislative sessions ends this month. A special...

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StudioTulsa

Our guest today is John Pavlovitz, a progressive Christian pastor, writer and activist from Raleigh, North Carolina. He's the author of the popular blog, "Stuff That Needs To Be Said," that offers advice and admonitions for Christians living in the era of Trump. His following on the blog has led to him being called the "digital pastor of the resistance".

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa has written a comprehensive account of the financial crisis of 2008, it's roots that go back decades, and how it spawned further economic and political crises in the years since, from Brexit and the Euro-crisis in Greece, to the conflict in Ukraine, and rise of economic nationalism in the U-S, and throughout Europe. Adam Tooze is a Professor of History at Columbia University and author of "The Deluge" and "The Wages of Destruction", both award-winning economic histories of the world after World War I, and Nazi Germany respectively.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we feature our interview with Tulsa Arts Fellowship writer Anna Badkhen. Badkhen has been a journalist and war correspondent in many of the world's conflict areas in this century, and the author of six books of literary non-fiction about the remarkable people she has met in her travels; families who due to conflict, globalization, or climate change, find their way of life on a knife's edge.

On this encore edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is F. Diane Barth, a longtime psychotherapist based in New York City. She joins us to discuss her new book, "I Know How You Feel: The Joy and Heartbreak of Friendship in Women's Lives." As was noted of this readable and useful study by Kirkus Reviews: "A psychotherapist offers advice about how to be, and keep, a friend.

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A warning: Parts of this story contain content that is sexually explicit.

Twenty years ago Friday, the long-running independent counsel Whitewater investigation had come to a head, far from where it started, with prosecutors questioning President Bill Clinton about his relationship with a former White House intern, Monica Lewinsky.

Updated at 7:20 a.m. ET

Former United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan died Saturday, the foundation bearing his name confirmed.

"Kofi Annan was a global statesman and a deeply committed internationalist who fought throughout his life for a fairer and more peaceful world. During his distinguished career and leadership of the United Nations he was an ardent champion of peace, sustainable development, human rights and the rule of law," the Kofi Annan Foundation and Annan family said in a statement.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

20 years ago today, President Bill Clinton testified before the Office of Independent Counsel and a grand jury about his relationship with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

20 years ago today, President Bill Clinton testified before the Office of Independent Counsel and a grand jury about his relationship with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

20 years ago today, President Bill Clinton testified before the Office of Independent Counsel and a grand jury about his relationship with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Yo-Yo Ma opened his recent Tiny Desk concert with the gently rolling "Prelude" from J. S. Bach's Unaccompanied Cello Suite No. 1. It's music Ma has lived with nearly all of his life.

"Believe it or not, this was the very first piece of music I started on the cello when I was four years old," he told the crowd, tightly squeezed between the office furniture on NPR's fourth floor.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

20 years ago today, President Bill Clinton testified before the Office of Independent Counsel and a grand jury about his relationship with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

20 years ago today, President Bill Clinton testified before the Office of Independent Counsel and a grand jury about his relationship with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

It was just after 7:30 p.m. on July 26 when dispatchers heard Jeremy Stoke's mayday call. The fire inspector had been in his pickup heading to evacuate a neighborhood in northwest Redding, Calif., when he was trapped by the blaze himself.

Only silence answered the dispatchers' replies. They found Stoke's body the next day.

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