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More Oklahoma Parents Seeking Child Immunization Exemptions

The Oklahoma Department of Health says an increasing number of parents in the state are seeking exemptions from immunizations for their school-age children. A survey of kindergarten students last year found that the exemption rate increased by three-tenths of 1 percent from the previous year. The state's overall exemption rate is 2.2 percent, equal to the national median rate. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says more than 90 percent of children enter Oklahoma public schools...

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Unversity of Tulsa

Hogs Shut Out TU 23-0

When Arkansas freshman quarterback Connor Noland trotted off the field after throwing an interception on the first drive, Razorbacks coach Chad Morris didn't have to say much to make sure his first-time starter stayed confident. This was the moment kids across Arkansas (2-6) dream of, especially ones like Noland — an Arkansas native and fan his entire life. Morris stuck with his quarterback, and the move paid off in a 23-0 victory over Tulsa on Saturday. "I just kind of patted him on the head...

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What's Cookin', Kiddo? America's Test Kitchen Unveils Book For Young Chefs

Eight-year-old Lucy Gray is wide-eyed and quivering with anticipation when I arrive at her house in suburban Maryland. I am sorry to report that I am not the object of her excitement. She is thrilled because she will soon be cooking with my companion, Molly Birnbaum, editor in chief of America's Test Kitchen Kids . America's Test Kitchen has long been a reliable source of advice for home cooks. The kitchen tests tools, techniques and recipes before making recommendations through its TV show,...

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On the Next All This Jazz: Stanley Turrentine, Alan Ferber, Jay Hoggard, and Anita O'Day

Dig the next All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 20th, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. Every Saturday night, both online and over the air, our show delivers three hours of recent and classic jazz, across a range of styles, from 9 o'clock till midnight. From John Coltrane to John Zorn, Chris Connor to Kris Davis, Annie Ross to Anat Cohen, and Bill Holman to Bill Frisell, All This Jazz is delighted by modern (and post-modern!) jazz in its many forms, and we love sharing the...

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StudioTulsa

Our guest is Jill Bialosky, a writer based in NYC who's published several collections of poetry as well as the bestselling memoir, "History of a Suicide: My Sister's Unfinished Life." She joins us to discuss her latest book, an engaging memoir/anthology titled "Poetry Will Save Your Life." Per The Chicago Tribune: "A delightfully hybrid book: part anthology, part critical study, part autobiography.... Candid and canny.... Bialosky's erudite and instructive approach to poetry [is] itself a refreshing tonic." Please note that Ms. Bialosky, who is also an editor at W. W.

The Early Childhood Education Institute (or ECEI) at OU-Tulsa last month received a $2.7 million grant from NIH's National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to extend its work with researchers from Georgetown University.

The nonprofit Clarehouse -- a home in Tulsa offering loving care for people in the last month of life -- is now presenting its annual Community Conversation Series. This series, per the Clarehouse website, is a multi-venue line-up that "advances the discussion about end-of-life care and wishes, opening our minds and hearts to dialogue about death and dying.

Originally formed at The Juilliard School, Tesla Quartet won 2nd Prize at the prestigious Banff International String Quartet Competition in 2016. And their very first CD is just being released this month. Chamber Music Tulsa is pleased to bring this special collective back to our community; they were last in town in 2013. Tesla will offer a pair of exciting concerts this weekend: tonight (the 12th) at the Renaissance Square Event Center on 11th Street, and then Sunday afternoon (the 14th) at the Williams Theatre in the Tulsa PAC.

Our guest is Shane Bauer, a senior reporter for Mother Jones. He joins us to discuss a sobering new book that grew out of his outstanding reporting for that magazine.

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Hurricane Willa, an "extremely dangerous" storm heading to Mexico's Pacific coast, was upgraded to Category 4 by the National Hurricane Center late Sunday.

The storm, with maximum sustained winds of 145 mph, is about 210 miles away from Cabo Corrientes, a municipality in southwest Mexico. The storm is moving north-northwest at 7 mph, according to the NHC's latest advisory.

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Migrant Caravan Grows to 5,000

9 hours ago

A growing crowd of Central American migrants in southern Mexico resumed its advance toward the U.S. border on Sunday. The advances have overwhelmed Mexican officials' attempts to stop them at the border.

The Associated Press reports that the number of migrants swelled to about 5,000 overnight.

On Saturday, President Trump told reporters the migrants were "hardened criminals."

How One Group Is Galvanizing Dissatisfied Voters

11 hours ago

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And now another story in our Troll Watch series.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Congolese rebels killed 15 civilians and abducted a dozen children in an attack at the center of the latest deadly Ebola outbreak, Congo's military said Sunday. The violence has threatened to again force the suspension of crucial virus contamination efforts.

The Allied Democratic Forces rebels, a Ugandan Islamist militant group active in the area since the 1990s, attacked Congolese army positions and several neighborhoods of Beni on Saturday and into Sunday, Capt. Mak Hazukay Mongha told The Associated Press.

More than a week after Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida panhandle, cities and towns are facing the daunting task of trying to rebuild. The recovery is hampered by catastrophic damage not only to homes and businesses, but to vital infrastructure as well.

The small Gulf coast town of Port St. Joe, with a population of about 3,500 residents, is one of countless communities that was hit by the storm.

"Everywhere you turn and go you see some kind of destruction," says the town's mayor, Bo Patterson. "Whether it was wind damage, whether it was water, one of the two."

Eight-year-old Lucy Gray is wide-eyed and quivering with anticipation when I arrive at her house in suburban Maryland. I am sorry to report that I am not the object of her excitement. She is thrilled because she will soon be cooking with my companion, Molly Birnbaum, editor in chief of America's Test Kitchen Kids.

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