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State Chamber of Oklahoma Calls for Medical Marijuana Delay or Special Session

The State Chamber of Oklahoma gave lawmakers a list of concerns Wednesday about medical marijuana in the workplace. Members of the Medical Marijuana Working Group asked Chamber President and CEO Fred Morgan about a potential special session. "If we could delay implementation, it will give this committee and the legislature time to be able to put this regulatory scheme in place. If not, we would like to see the legislature move as quickly as possible to address the concerns we’ve raised,"...

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Lawmakers Take Stock of Oklahoma Work-Based Learning Efforts

Oklahoma is trying to get more people into work-based learning like apprenticeships, and an interim study reviewed aspects of that work. The "Earn and Learn Oklahoma" program targets low-income residents and out-of-school youth for training and connection to apprenticeships and internships. As part of those efforts, the state uses an ACT assessment called WorkKeys to issue a career readiness certificate. Some lawmakers wonder if the state can’t get by with a cheaper version. WorkKeys includes...

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Experts Are Underwhelmed By North Korea's Promise To Dismantle Missile Site

North Korea announced today that it will permanently close a major missile test site. Kim Jong Un, the North's leader, said the site would be dismantled in the presence of international inspectors. But experts who have been watching the site say the gesture will do virtually nothing to hamper the North's missile and nuclear weapons capabilities. Instead, they say, the move represents the latest in the North's piecemeal disarmament on its own terms. In May, North Korea demolished entrances to...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we offer Episode 2 of Season 2 of Museum Confidential, the podcast co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum of Art and our own Scott Gregory. This episode contains an in-depth chat with Alexis Light, the Senior Manager of Media Relations and Marketing at The Frick Collection. She is that NYC museum's thought leader when it comes to public relations, marketing, and social media content.

Tulsa Ballet will begin a new season tomorrow night (Friday the 14th) with the return of its long-running "Creations in Studio K" annual presentation. This time out, the three-part "Creations" evening includes a first-time-ever collaboration between Tulsa Ballet and Philbrook Museum of Art -- i.e., a work entitled "Pentaptych." Our guests today, choreographer Ma Cong and artist Eric Sall, tell us all about this special dance-meets-painting endeavor: how it came about, how it was developed and refined, and how it will unfold onstage.

Our guest is Edith Chapin, the Executive Editor of NPR News, who is currently visiting the Tulsa community. Before joining NPR in 2012, she spent 25 years at CNN, working as an intern, then as a bureau chief, and finally as a vice president. Please note that Chapin will take part in a special Public Radio Tulsa "Give & Take" event tonight, the 12th, in the Lorton Performance Center on the TU campus.

What happens when one of the world's most oil-wealthy nations becomes a failed state? Our guest is Ambassador Patrick Duddy, the director of Duke University's Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies who also teaches at the Sanford School of Public Policy. Before arriving at Duke, Ambassador Duddy served as a U.S. diplomat for nearly 30 years; upon his retirement, he was one of the State Department's most senior Latin American specialists.

Medical Marijuana was approved by voters here in Oklahoma as recently as June of this year, yet so much is happening on this front -- medically, politically, economically, legislatively, etc. -- that it can be rather difficult to stay informed. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Jackie Fortier, the StateImpact Oklahoma reporter who covers health and medicine for KWGS, KGOU, KOSU, and other public radio outlets across the state. Fortier brings us up to speed on the fast-moving, far-reaching story that is Medical Marijuana in Oklahoma.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 Texas Public Radio. To see more, visit Texas Public Radio.

Kathy Mattea has been successfully making music for a long time. Her first gold album came out in 1987. She won her first Grammy in 1990. For a while, she was putting out albums every year or two. But Mattea's latest LP, Pretty Bird, out now, is the country artist's first release in six years — and it almost didn't come out at all.

An indicted New York congressman who had announced he was withdrawing from his race has reversed course and now says he will continue to campaign for re-election and plans to serve again if he wins this November.

In a campaign statement announcing the decision Wednesday, U.S. Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y. said, "The stakes are too high to allow the radical left to take control of this seat in Congress."

Late in the fourth quarter of last weekend's Denver Broncos football game, the Broncos were well-positioned for a win. The team trailed the Oakland Raiders 19-17, but Denver was in comfortable range to score a three-point field goal.

But strangely, for an 18-second period, Denver was a long-shot, 750-1 underdog to win the game on the bookmaker FanDuel.

Conservationists have developed a new high-tech strategy to trace the cartels that smuggle much of the illegal ivory around the world — by using DNA to track ivory back to specific ports.

Biologist Samuel Wasser from the University of Washington is behind the effort. He notes that while poaching in Africa has dipped recently, too many elephants are still dying.

"Right now we're estimating that there are about 40,000 elephants being killed every year," he says, "and there are only 400,000 left in Africa. So that's a tenth of the population a year."

Retirement for Guadalupe Padilla Mendoza meant pursuing her passion: Rescue dogs. The former public servant had begun taking street dogs into her home in Mexico City, squeezing as many as she could into a humble apartment.

But a 7.1 magnitude earthquake that ripped through her city and killed hundreds on Sept. 19, 2017, changed her plans.

The uproar over clergy sex abuse in the Catholic church is no longer just about sex abuse. It now touches on Catholic teaching about sexuality in general and even on Pope Francis himself, his agenda, and the future of his papacy.

When a Pennsylvania grand jury last month reported that more than 300 priests had molested more than a thousand children across six dioceses under investigation, it became clear that the cases were not isolated incidents. The problem of abusive priests and the bishops who cover up for them is systemic across the whole church.

Copyright 2018 WNYC Radio. To see more, visit WNYC Radio.

Updated September 19, 6:02 p.m.

The results of a seven-month-long investigation into sexual harassment and workplace misconduct within the Dallas Mavericks organization over a period spanning more than 20 years were released Wednesday.

Investigators gathered information from 215 interviews with current and former employees who worked for the team during the past two decades and evaluated more than 1.6 million documents for the more than 40-page report.

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