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Candidates for Governor in Oklahoma Face Off at Forum

The Democrat trying to capture the governor's seat in Oklahoma said Monday his government experience is a benefit, but he also quickly pointed out that it's been eight years since he's held office in the red state where a dozen incumbents have already lost primary elections this year. Drew Edmondson, a 71-year-old former attorney general who served four terms, has painted the Republicans' nearly decadelong control of Oklahoma state government as a disaster that led to massive budget...

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OSU Opens Specialized Clinic to Boost Access to Substance Abuse Treatment

A new OSU Medicine clinic in Tulsa will focus on treating substance abuse disorders, especially addiction to prescription painkillers. The OSU Addiction Medicine Clinic is located at treatment center 12 & 12 and is affiliated with the addiction treatment leader the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation. Around one in 10 Oklahomans struggles with addiction, but only about one in three seeking treatment are able to get it. The clinic will offer individualized treatment for substance abuse disorder...

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Airports At Water's Edge Battle Rising Sea Levels

From the ramp tower 120 feet above the runway, it's clear Philadelphia International Airport is surrounded by water. There is wetland, a network of creeks, and just a couple hundred yards away, the tidal Delaware River leading out to the Bay. As with many airports, the original idea was to build on a large tract of land convenient to a city, but far enough away from homes and tall buildings. Often, that meant coastal wetlands and landfill. Now, such airports are threatened. A federal report...

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StudioTulsa

Our guest is Sarah Mondale, director of the newly released and engrossing documentary, "Backpack Full of Cash." As is noted of this film at its website: "Narrated by Matt Damon, this feature-length documentary explores the growing privatization of public schools and the resulting impact on America's most vulnerable children.

The Judy O. Berry Honorary Lecture Series is an annual symposium presented by the TU Department of Psychology; the series features topics related to risk and resilience in children and in families. This year's keynote speaker is our guest on StudioTulsa: Dr. Courtney Stevens is Associate Professor and Director of the Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon.

Our guest is Linda Kay Klein, whose detailed and engrossing new memoir looks at the devastating effects that evangelical Christianity's purity culture has had on a generation of young women in America. Back in the 1990s, the widespread white evangelical Christian culture created a "purity movement" of sorts -- purity rings, purity pledges, purity balls, etc. Girls were seen by this movement as potential sexual "stumbling blocks" for boys and men, and any expression of a girl's sexuality could be judged as a corruption of her character.

Our guest is Dr. Geoffrey Chow, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery at the OU-TU School of Community Medicine. Specializing in General Surgery and Minimally Invasive Surgery, he joins us to preview a public lecture he'll soon give here in Tulsa on reflux. "Heartburn, Reflux, and Pills" will be delivered by Dr. Chow at the OU Physicians South Memorial campus on Thursday, September 27th. (The venue's address is 8005 E. 106th Street; the start time is 6pm.) Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we offer Episode 2 of Season 2 of Museum Confidential, the podcast co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum of Art and our own Scott Gregory. This episode contains an in-depth chat with Alexis Light, the Senior Manager of Media Relations and Marketing at The Frick Collection. She is that NYC museum's thought leader when it comes to public relations, marketing, and social media content.

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It's a terrifying weapon: a nuclear-powered cruise missile that can fly anywhere on the planet, possibly spewing radioactivity as it goes. In March, Russian President Vladimir Putin announced that his nation had successfully tested just such a machine.

But new satellite imagery of a remote Russian test site suggests that the missile may not be working as well as claimed.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 WHYY. To see more, visit WHYY.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

At midnight, Oct. 1, the rush begins.

That's when first-time and returning college students can get their first look at the 2019-'20 FAFSA, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Anyone who wants the government's help paying for college has to finish the notoriously complicated form. But this year, in an effort to make it easier, the U.S. Department of Education has given the FAFSA a new look: a smartphone application.

Starting this semester, the Colorado School of Mines is offering the world's first degree programs in Space Resources — essentially mining in outer space.

It's not just academic institutions like the School of Mines taking note; a small but growing number of startups expect this to be very big business sooner than a lot of us might think.

Hurricane season means people on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts live with the possibility of evacuation for several months each year. But in the part of the country prone to wildfires, being ready to evacuate has now become a way of life with wildfires turning into a year-round threat.

Last year, wildfires destroyed thousands of homes around California. And this summer, it happened again with wildfire devouring entire neighborhoods in the city of Redding.

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