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Dangerous Tiny Pill Hits Oklahoma Streets

The Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics, Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration are working to identify the source of a deadly counterfeit prescription drug. OBN Spokesman Mark Woodward says in recent weeks, one person has died and another victim was hospitalized after purchasing the drug on the streets. AGENT MARK WOODWARD: “ It appears both victims bought what they thought was the prescription painkiller, Oxycodone. However, a sample of a pill submitted...

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Tulsa Police Obtain Arrest Warrant in 2017 Murder Case

Tulsa Police say after a more than yearlong investigation, they’ve found the man responsible for the April 2017 murder of 43-year-old Amy Robertson. Deputy Chief Dennis Larsen said detectives presented their findings to the district attorney today. "They found sufficient probable cause to believe the suspect, Dennis John Kurtz — a.k.a Dennis Vargas – committed the crimes of first-degree rape and first-degree murder, and a felony warrant was issued for his arrest in the homicide of Amy...

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Florence Engulfs Hog Farms And Chicken Houses, Thrashing North Carolina Agriculture

Farmers across the southeastern part of North Carolina are just starting to report details about the hit they've taken from Hurricane Florence. The rain is over, but rivers still are rising, and the full picture of damage to farms and the surrounding environment probably won't be known for weeks. Before the hurricane, many were worried about thousands of open-air ponds where farmers store manure from their hogs, allowing the waste to decompose. According to the North Carolina Department of...

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This Old House (Museum)

StudioTulsa

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we offer Episode 2 of Season 2 of Museum Confidential, the podcast co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum of Art and our own Scott Gregory. This episode contains an in-depth chat with Alexis Light, the Senior Manager of Media Relations and Marketing at The Frick Collection. She is that NYC museum's thought leader when it comes to public relations, marketing, and social media content.

Tulsa Ballet will begin a new season tomorrow night (Friday the 14th) with the return of its long-running "Creations in Studio K" annual presentation. This time out, the three-part "Creations" evening includes a first-time-ever collaboration between Tulsa Ballet and Philbrook Museum of Art -- i.e., a work entitled "Pentaptych." Our guests today, choreographer Ma Cong and artist Eric Sall, tell us all about this special dance-meets-painting endeavor: how it came about, how it was developed and refined, and how it will unfold onstage.

Our guest is Edith Chapin, the Executive Editor of NPR News, who is currently visiting the Tulsa community. Before joining NPR in 2012, she spent 25 years at CNN, working as an intern, then as a bureau chief, and finally as a vice president. Please note that Chapin will take part in a special Public Radio Tulsa "Give & Take" event tonight, the 12th, in the Lorton Performance Center on the TU campus.

What happens when one of the world's most oil-wealthy nations becomes a failed state? Our guest is Ambassador Patrick Duddy, the director of Duke University's Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies who also teaches at the Sanford School of Public Policy. Before arriving at Duke, Ambassador Duddy served as a U.S. diplomat for nearly 30 years; upon his retirement, he was one of the State Department's most senior Latin American specialists.

Medical Marijuana was approved by voters here in Oklahoma as recently as June of this year, yet so much is happening on this front -- medically, politically, economically, legislatively, etc. -- that it can be rather difficult to stay informed. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Jackie Fortier, the StateImpact Oklahoma reporter who covers health and medicine for KWGS, KGOU, KOSU, and other public radio outlets across the state. Fortier brings us up to speed on the fast-moving, far-reaching story that is Medical Marijuana in Oklahoma.

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New life was breathed into a perennial debate this week, when a former Sesame Street writer revealed that not only did he consider beloved characters Bert and Ernie to be a gay couple, but he used his own relationship as creative inspiration.

On Sunday, Queerty published an interview with Mark Saltzman, who worked on the show in the 1980s and 90s, asking him if he thought of Bert and Ernie as a gay couple.

Updated at 6:05 p.m. ET

President Trump issued his most forceful defense yet of his embattled Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Tuesday.

Speaking to reporters during a press conference with Poland's president, Trump called Kavanaugh "a great man" and said that he feels "terribly" for the federal appeals court judge and his family.

The Supreme Court on Tuesday insisted that many donations to predominantly conservative political nonprofit groups — what's often called dark money — be disclosed, seven weeks ahead of the 2018 midterm elections.

The ruling closes, at least for now, a loophole that has allowed wealthy donors to finance aggressive ads while staying anonymous. Crafted by the Federal Election Commission nearly 40 years ago, the loophole flourished after the 2010 Citizens United ruling.

Updated at 11:00 p.m. ET

The Senate Judiciary Committee will move forward with a hearing scheduled for Monday on sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, despite a request for further investigation from his accuser.

Floodwaters keep rising in the Carolinas as post-Tropical Storm Florence continues to dump rain on the region. The dangerous storm has already left more than 30 dead and displaced thousands of others, leaving them without electricity or shelter.

In the aftermath of Florence, North and South Carolina officials are encouraging people to volunteer or donate if they can. Here's a guide to how to help.

Why give cash

Facebook became embroiled in another controversy Tuesday, after the American Civil Liberties Union accused the company of giving employers a powerful tool to discriminate against women seeking work.

The complaint alleges that Facebook allowed employers to target job ads exclusively to men — that "they're profiting from thousands of ads that are being hidden from women," civil rights lawyer Peter Romer-Friedman of Outten & Golden told NPR.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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