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Rainy Weekend Ahead; Flood Watch Issued

Showers and widely scattered thunderstorms are expected to become widespread across eastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas this morning and early this afternoon as a cold front moves into the area from the north. This front and an approaching upper level disturbance will move into a very moist and slightly unstable air mass across the region, resulting in numerous showers and thunderstorms through tonight. Severe weather is unlikely with this activity, but locally heavy rainfall is...

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Michael Willmus-Oklahoma Watch

Corrections Board Wants Overcrowding Solved

The Oklahoma Department of Corrections wants more room at the inn. The state prison system was at 113% capacity yesterday. The Corrections Board approved two resolutions calling for the state to issue bond to update facilities and build a new prison. The approvals, which came during the board’s September meeting at Jackie Brannon Correctional Center in McAlester, specifically authorize and direct Oklahoma Department of Corrections Director Joe M. Allbaugh to: Negotiate, finalize and execute...

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Trump Attacks Kavanaugh Accuser By Name Amid Negotiations For Hearing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4OjEksiJA4 Updated at 1:45 p.m. President Trump has ended what had been a notably restrained response to the accusation by Christine Blasey Ford that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her more than 30 years ago. In a series of tweets Friday, Trump cast doubt on Ford's charge, mentioning her by name for the first time : "I have no doubt that, if the attack on Dr. Ford was as bad as she says, charges would have been immediately filed with...

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StudioTulsa

The Judy O. Berry Honorary Lecture Series is an annual symposium presented by the TU Department of Psychology; the series features topics related to risk and resilience in children and in families. This year's keynote speaker is our guest on StudioTulsa: Dr. Courtney Stevens is Associate Professor and Director of the Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon.

Our guest is Linda Kay Klein, whose detailed and engrossing new memoir looks at the devastating effects that evangelical Christianity's purity culture has had on a generation of young women in America. Back in the 1990s, the widespread white evangelical Christian culture created a "purity movement" of sorts -- purity rings, purity pledges, purity balls, etc. Girls were seen by this movement as potential sexual "stumbling blocks" for boys and men, and any expression of a girl's sexuality could be judged as a corruption of her character.

Our guest is Dr. Geoffrey Chow, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery at the OU-TU School of Community Medicine. Specializing in General Surgery and Minimally Invasive Surgery, he joins us to preview a public lecture he'll soon give here in Tulsa on reflux. "Heartburn, Reflux, and Pills" will be delivered by Dr. Chow at the OU Physicians South Memorial campus on Thursday, September 27th. (The venue's address is 8005 E. 106th Street; the start time is 6pm.) Dr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we offer Episode 2 of Season 2 of Museum Confidential, the podcast co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum of Art and our own Scott Gregory. This episode contains an in-depth chat with Alexis Light, the Senior Manager of Media Relations and Marketing at The Frick Collection. She is that NYC museum's thought leader when it comes to public relations, marketing, and social media content.

Tulsa Ballet will begin a new season tomorrow night (Friday the 14th) with the return of its long-running "Creations in Studio K" annual presentation. This time out, the three-part "Creations" evening includes a first-time-ever collaboration between Tulsa Ballet and Philbrook Museum of Art -- i.e., a work entitled "Pentaptych." Our guests today, choreographer Ma Cong and artist Eric Sall, tell us all about this special dance-meets-painting endeavor: how it came about, how it was developed and refined, and how it will unfold onstage.

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Officials in Tanzania say the death toll from a ferry sinking on Lake Victoria has risen to at least 100 people, but with hundreds of passengers thought to have been on board, the toll is expected to rise.

John Mongella, commissioner for the Mwanza region, initially put the number of dead at 86, but Tanzania's state radio TBC said more than 100 bodies had been found so far.

Russian social media agitators who pushed pro-gun messages in the United States sometimes copied the language of the National Rifle Association. And sometimes, the NRA copied them.

What isn't clear is whether there was any relationship between the social media users or whether the duplication was done without the other's awareness, part of the broader tide of advocacy about gun rights.

What is clear is that, at times, the Russians followed so closely behind the American gun rights group that it duplicated its content word for word.

It's been a tough couple of years for the business of voting.

There's the state that discovered a Russian oligarch now finances the company that hosts its voting data.

Then there's the company that manufactures and services voter registration software in eight states that found itself hacked by Russian operatives leading up to the 2016 presidential election.

And then there's the largest voting machine company in the country, which initially denied and then admitted it had installed software on its systems considered by experts to be extremely vulnerable to hacking.

Updated at 4:40 a.m. ET

Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang, one of three top leaders in the Southeast Asian country, has died at age 61, according to state media, which says he suffered from a "serious illness."

Quang was sworn in as president in 2016 and served in the largely ceremonial post alongside Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc and secretary-general of the Vietnamese Communist Party, Nguyen Phu Trong, who experts believe wields the bulk of the power in the country's leadership triumvirate.

For nearly two decades Enric Marco was a highly respected figure in Spain, widely known as a Holocaust survivor, Civil War hero and resistance fighter against the Francisco Franco regime. He even held public speaking engagements detailing his experiences in a concentration camp.

But every bit of it was a lie.

In 2005 Marco's masquerade was exposed to the world by historian Benito Bermejo — piquing the interest of novelist Javier Cercas. As Cercas soon discovered, "he had made up everything. Not only about that, I mean — he invented his whole life."

Florence may have concluded its crawl over the Carolinas, but officials are warning residents not to let the fairer weather deceive them. For days, the storm dumped relentless rain — in some places about 3 feet — and as all that water continues to make its way downstream, rivers keep on rising.

The storm's death toll ticked up to 41 people on Thursday; 31 people in North Carolina alone, which entered its 13th day under a state of emergency.

Updated at 12:10 p.m. Friday

Newly unsealed court documents have explained the mysterious closure of a New Mexico observatory earlier this month, revealing that authorities were investigating one of the facility's janitors for possession and distribution of child pornography.

The Sunspot Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak was shut for 11 days for "a security issue," and its closure drew cheeky speculation that authorities were investigating the presence of UFOs.

Google has warned some senators and Senate aides that their personal Google accounts have been targets of attempted hacks backed by foreign governments, the company confirmed on Thursday.

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., wrote to Senate leaders on Wednesday that his office has discovered a number of senators and Senate staff members were warned by a major technology company "that their personal email accounts were targeted by foreign government hackers."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

And we're going to take you next to a place few Americans have ever seen - the inside of a classroom in North Korea.

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