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Truth In Accounting

Oklahoma Earns 'C,' Ranks 14th in State Finance Watchdog's Annual Report

Oklahoma improved on an annual report card for state finances. Truth In Accounting grades are based on taxpayers’ share of the state’s debt. Last year, Oklahomans’ was $5,100. "We give people a 'D' if your per taxpayer burden is more than $5,000, and now you guys have jumped up to $2,900, which is in our 'C' category," said Truth In Accounting founder and CEO Sheila Weinberg. Truth In Accounting calculated Oklahoma has $10.1 billion in available assets but $13.3 billion in bills. The group...

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Will Congress Bring Sky-High Air Ambulance Bills Down To Earth?

Air ambulance rides can be lifesavers. But how much should they cost? In the ongoing, crowdsourced "Bill of the Month" investigation, NPR and Kaiser Health News have received more than a dozen bills from people around the country on the hook for medevac helicopter rides that ranged from $28,000 to $97,000. What gives? Why should a lifesaving flight come with a life-altering bill? If an air ambulance service isn't part of a patient's insurance network, the operator can charge patients for the...

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Poll: Nearly 6 In 10 To Closely Watch Kavanaugh-Ford Hearing; Many Undecided On Truth

The stakes are high for Thursday's Capitol Hill hearing, pitting Trump Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh against Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused him of sexual assault — an accusation Kavanaugh has denied — when they were both in high school more than three decades ago. A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds that almost 6-in-10 Americans (58 percent) say they will be following the proceeding closely or very closely and a plurality haven't made up their minds on who's telling...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about Susan G. Komen, the world's largest breast cancer organization, which funds more breast cancer research than any other nonprofit while also providing help, in a variety of ways, to those facing the disease. Tulsa's Komen affiliate, which began in 1997, will present its 22nd annual Komen Race for the Cure this coming Saturday (the 29th) as part of its ongoing effort to raise funds for, and care for, women and their families throughout Eastern Oklahoma.

On this edition of ST, we learn about a free-to-the-public event happening tomorrow (Saturday the 22nd) at the Turkey Mountain Urban Wilderness Area in Tulsa (at 6850 South Elwood Avenue). Tulsa's River Parks Authority will present "Monarchs on the Mountain," a festival celebrating the vital role that Eastern Oklahoma plays in the Great Monarch Butterfly Migration, every autumn, from Canada to Mexico.

Our guest is Sarah Mondale, director of the newly released and engrossing documentary, "Backpack Full of Cash." As is noted of this film at its website: "Narrated by Matt Damon, this feature-length documentary explores the growing privatization of public schools and the resulting impact on America's most vulnerable children.

The Judy O. Berry Honorary Lecture Series is an annual symposium presented by the TU Department of Psychology; the series features topics related to risk and resilience in children and in families. This year's keynote speaker is our guest on StudioTulsa: Dr. Courtney Stevens is Associate Professor and Director of the Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon.

Our guest is Linda Kay Klein, whose detailed and engrossing new memoir looks at the devastating effects that evangelical Christianity's purity culture has had on a generation of young women in America. Back in the 1990s, the widespread white evangelical Christian culture created a "purity movement" of sorts -- purity rings, purity pledges, purity balls, etc. Girls were seen by this movement as potential sexual "stumbling blocks" for boys and men, and any expression of a girl's sexuality could be judged as a corruption of her character.

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At midnight, Oct. 1, the rush begins.

That's when first-time and returning college students can get their first look at the 2019-'20 FAFSA, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Anyone who wants the government's help paying for college has to finish the notoriously complicated form. But this year, in an effort to make it easier, the U.S. Department of Education has given the FAFSA a new look: a smartphone application.

Starting this semester, the Colorado School of Mines is offering the world's first degree programs in Space Resources — essentially mining in outer space.

It's not just academic institutions like the School of Mines taking note; a small but growing number of startups expect this to be very big business sooner than a lot of us might think.

Hurricane season means people on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts live with the possibility of evacuation for several months each year. But in the part of the country prone to wildfires, being ready to evacuate has now become a way of life with wildfires turning into a year-round threat.

Last year, wildfires destroyed thousands of homes around California. And this summer, it happened again with wildfire devouring entire neighborhoods in the city of Redding.

Rob Goldstone, the man who sent the email to Donald Trump Jr. that proclaimed "Russia and its government's support" for the Trump campaign, now says he had no idea what he was talking about.

In fact, not only did he not know the Russian government had launched a broader program of "active measures" against the 2016 election, Goldstone also says he made up some of the most important details in the message.

Airports At Water's Edge Battle Rising Sea Levels

Sep 25, 2018

From the ramp tower 120 feet above the runway, it's clear Philadelphia International Airport is surrounded by water. There is wetland, a network of creeks and, just a couple hundred yards away, the tidal Delaware River leading out to the bay. As with many airports, the original idea was to build on a large tract of land convenient to a city but far enough away from homes and tall buildings. Often, that meant coastal wetlands and landfill.

Now, such airports are threatened.

Lauren Underwood, Democratic House candidate in Illinois' 14th district, is part of a record boom of women running for office in 2018 – from Congress to governorships to state legislatures across the country.

But she didn't just wake up one day and decide this was the year.

Standing behind the Tiny Desk with only pianist Sullivan Fortner by her side, jazz singer Cécile McLorin Salvant remarked that she hadn't been this nervous in a while. But it was hard to tell: She embraced the discomfort with ease, taking command of the space with a calm demeanor and spiritual presence that felt both humble and persuasive.

When building inspectors picked through the wreckage of Arthur Capper Senior Apartments following a fire last week, they made a startling discovery: 74-year-old Raymond Holton, alive and well.

Allyn Kilsheimer, the structural engineer who found Holton, said in a news conference on Monday, "I had to use crowbars and construction workers to get into his door, he would have had to use them to get out. There was no way for him in my opinion to get out."

The fire left more than 100 residents displaced.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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