Rich Fisher

General Manager & host of StudioTulsa

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government.  Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.  

In addition, Rich is an active musician. He’s currently the principal trombonist of the Signature Symphony at TCC, leads the Starlight Jazz Orchestra, and is a free-lance musician whose work ranges from the pit of touring Broadway musicals, to the salsa band, Grupo Salsabor.

Ways to Connect

On this edition of our program, a discussion of the personhood movement, the patriarchy movement, the anti-abortion movement, and the points in our American socio-political landscape where all three movements now intersect. We speak by phone with Kathryn Joyce, a freelance journalist whose writing has appeared in The Nation, Mother Jones, The Atlantic, Ms., Slate, Salon, Newsweek, The Daily Beast, The American Prospect, and other publications. Ms.

The crisis in primary care medicine is becoming more evident every day. Long wait times for an appointment, practices closed to new patients, and long waiting room times remind us that primary care physicians are being stretched. Despite record enrollments in American medical schools, however, fewer doctors are choosing primary care as their focus. On this edition of StudioTulsa, Boston General Internist Dr.

In July, Mexican voters will elect a new president. Although it's not getting much coverage here in the States --- where we, of course, have our own upcoming nationwide election to fixate upon --- the electoral race now happening in Mexico is a fiercely contested one. And one key issue in that race is whether the government should continue President Calderon's so-called "war on drugs" --- an issue that could have profound consequences for the U.S. On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Richard L.

On this edition of ST, guest host Scott Gregory speaks with the widely acclaimed American poet, John Brehm, who grew up in Nebraska, lived for many years in New York City (and then Colorado), and is now based in Portland, Oregon. Brehm has just published his second book of poems, "Help Is On the Way," which won the 2012 Four Lakes Prize in Poetry; his first poetry collection, "Sea of Faith," won the 2004 Brittingham Prize in Poetry.

On today's program, we speak by phone with Dr. Fitzhugh Mullan, Professor of Medicine and Health Policy at The George Washington University. Dr. Mullan is one of the co-chairs for a conference called "Beyond Flexner 2012: Social Mission in Medical Education," which will happen next week at the Hyatt Regency Tulsa (at 100 East Second Street), from May 15th through the 17th. The conference is being presented by The W.K.

On today's program, a chat with the bestselling Tulsa-based author and historian, Michael Wallis. Back in January, as part of the long-running Tulsa Town Hall Speaker Series, Wallis addressed a capacity crowd at the Chapman Music Hall in the Tulsa Performing Arts Center. His talk focused on what it means to be an Oklahoman --- on the character, history, lineage, goals, misdeeds, and accomplishments of the people of the Sooner State. It was a speech that drew much applause, rave reviews, and numerous tributes in the weeks that followed its delivery.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Nancy Rappaport, a noted child psychiatrist and author. Dr. Rappaport, an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, is the co-author of a new book called, "The Behavior Code: A Practical Guide to Understanding and Teaching the Most Challenging Students" (Harvard Education Press). This book --- written with Jessica Minahan, a behavioral analyst --- is based on an academic collaboration dating back nearly a decade, and is aimed mainly at K-through-6th-Grade educators but will have much to offer parents, as well.

On our show today, we present a conversation with the Tulsa-based writer and curator Diana C. du Pont, who has recently published a book called "You Can't Eat Dirt: Leading America's First All-Women Tribal Council and How We Changed Palm Springs." It's a profile of one Vyola J. Ortner, who led the first-ever all-women tribal council in the United States, and it's co-written with Ortner herself.

On this edition of ST, we welcome the widely accomplished freelance classical conductor Alastair Willis, who will be the Guest Conductor for the Tulsa Symphony when it performs "Musical Fireworks" --- the title for its final concert of the season --- tomorrow night (May 5th) at the Tulsa PAC. The performance begins at 7:30 pm; it will include works by Handel ("Music for the Royal Fireworks"), Haydn ("Concerto for Trumpet"), and Bartok ("Concerto for Orchestra"), with the Haydn selection featuring the symphony's Principal Trumpeter, Tim McFadden.

On today's show, we speak with the gifted Alaskan writer Eowyn Ivey, whose first novel, "The Snow Child" (Reagan Arthur Books), appeared earlier this year to international acclaim. (And yes, in case you're wondering, Eowyn's mother did name her after a character in Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings.") As the following rave review from a critic at Amazon.com has noted: "In her haunting, evocative debut, Eowyn Ivey stakes her claim on a Russian fairy tale, daring the reader --- and the characters --- to be lulled into thinking they know the ending.

On today's show, which originally aired earlier this year, we offer a conversation with Katherine Newman, Dean of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University, who's written several books on middle-class economic instability, urban poverty, and the sociology of inequality.

"Homesick and Happy"

May 1, 2012

On today's edition of StudioTulsa, an informed discussion in praise of summer camp. Our guest is Michael Thompson, PhD, a consulting school psychologist and author who's widely known for his bestselling study of contemporary American boys and their emotions, "Raising Cain." Thompson's new book, just out as a Ballantine Trade Paperback Original, is "Homesick and Happy: How Time Away from Parents Can Help a Child Grow." In this work, he offers an engaging and well-researched consideration of both the traditions and advantages of summer camp.

On today's show, we speak with the writer and new-media strategist Mathew Gross, who (along with Mel Gilles) is one of the two authors of a thought-provoking and quite timely non-fiction book called "The Last Myth: What the Rise of Apocalyptic Thinking Tells Us About America." It's an engaging historical study that mainly explores two separate yet related queries: "Why are contemporary Americans so obsessed with the end of the world?" and "What does this obsession actually say about us, as a people?" Did you know, for example, that nearly 60 percent of Americans believe that the events fore

On today's ST, we speak with Christina Burke, Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at the Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. Burke assembled an exhibit which opened at the museum earlier this month, and which is on view through June 3rd, called "Seeking the Sacred: Religious Ritual in Native American Art." It's a show that mainly draws on Philbrook's world-famous collection of 20th-century Native American paintings.

On today's show, we speak with Thomas Skinner, a US Army veteran who's been battling Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (or PTSD) for more than two decades. Over the years, ever since he was honourably discharged from Fort Eustis in Virginia, Skinner has worked as a truck driver, a wildlife photographer, and at a few other jobs.

Today, we welcome back to our program Marcello Angelini, who's been the artistic director at Tulsa Ballet since 1995. As a critic writing for Dance Insider once noted: "To look at what Marcello Angelini has accomplished [since he arrived at] Tulsa Ballet is to see what a community-based arts revolution looks like." The glorious revolution continues with a new production --- the final show of the 2011-2012 season --- called "Off the Floor: Creations in Studio K," which will soon be staged at Tulsa Ballet's Studio K facility in Brookside (at 1212 East 45th Place South).

Last week, the nonprofit John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation released a survey of Tulsa residents' views on race relations. This survey was called for, and completed, before the recent (and perhaps racially motivated) shootings in North Tulsa in the pre-dawn hours of Good Friday --- but it's hardly surprising that, given the shocking tragedy of those violent acts and the coincidental appearance of this new survey, people throughout our community are speaking about issues of race with a candor that seems, in many cases, as rare as it is welcome.

On today's show, we present a chat with the charming, delightful, and highly accomplished young concert pianist, Petronel Malan, whose debut CD, "Transfigured Bach: The Complete Bach Transcriptions of Bartok, Lipatti, and Friedman," was nominated for three Grammy Awards in 2004. (She's made three additional CDs of "transfigured" music since then.) Malan will perform as a guest artist with Tulsa Camerata on Thursday night (the 26th) at 7pm in Emerson Hall at All Souls Unitarian Church in Tulsa.

Significant and far-ranging budgetary cutbacks are planned, over the next several years, for the United States Armed Forces --- how, if at all, will these reductions affect our country's military stature on the world stage? And how, if at all, will they influence our own feelings (or perceptions) of security here at home? On today's show, we welcome Col. Thomas X. Hammes (USMC, Retired), who recently gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations entitled “Defense in Times of Austerity.” In his three-decade stint in the Marine Corps, Col.

On today's program, we offer a linguistic/semantic discussion of technology and culture --- what these two terms mean, what they've meant, what they mean in America as opposed to Europe, and where the ideas behind these terms overlap.

Tomorrow night (Thursday the 19th) at 7pm, Temple Israel in Tulsa (at 2004 East 22nd Place, near Utica Square) will host the 15th Annual Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration; this year's commemoration is entitled "Why Memory Matters: Israel's Yad Vashem." The featured speaker at this event will be Dr. Mordecai Paldiel, the former director of the Department of the Righteous at Yad Vashem, which is Israel’s Holocaust authority. Dr. Paldiel, who's also our guest today on ST, is a leading authority on rescue during the Holocaust.

On today's StudioTulsa, which is a re-broadcast of a program that first aired back in January, we speak with Clay Johnson about his interesting new book, "The Information Diet: A Case for Conscious Consumption." Everyone knows that many of us --- perhaps most of us --- seem obsessed with information these days. We incessantly check our favorite websites, texts, instant messages, emails, downloads, videos, status updates, tweets, etc.

Dear Friend,

Many thanks for your continued support of Public Radio Tulsa. When I became manager back in 1999, I set out five major goals for public radio in Tulsa. The first was to replace our physical plant. We had a transmitter that was as old as me, and went off-the-air at the drop of a hat. Thanks to you and a few very generous donors, within a couple of years we were able to make our broadcasting facilities state of the art.

A century ago, women could not own property or vote. Today, women are the primary wage earners in about 40% of American households, and are poised to be a majority within twenty years if current trends continue. Washington Post staff writer Liza Mundy calls it "The Big Flip" and examines this huge cultural shift and its impact on gender roles, relationships, and social dynamics.

On today's show, we meet Bill Courtney, volunteer football coach of the impoverished North Memphis Manassas High School Tigers, and subject of the 2012 Oscar-winning documentary, "Undefeated." Filmmakers Dan Lindsay and T. J. Martin followed the coach and team through the 2009 season which found them on the verge of winning their first high school playoff game ever.

On today's edition of our show, we speak by phone with Lawrence Lessig, who is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School and the Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University.  A widely respected legal scholar and political activist, Lessig is known for his efforts to promote reduced legal restrictions on copyright as well as trademark laws --- particularly as these relate to the Internet and to other technology-based applications --- and for his sharp criticism of how Big Money has profoundly corrupted American politics.

On today's show, we hear from Susan Barrett, an associate professor in the TU Department of Theatre and Musical Theatre. Barrett is directing a new production of the Tony Award-winning musical, "The Drowsy Chaperone," which opened on Broadway in 2006. As Barrett tells us, this funny and terrifically fun-to-watch musical actually began as a spoof --- written for a wedding reception --- of old-time musicals . . . and of the out-dated styles, politically incorrect jokes, and wonderful, jazzy tunes that tend to define such musicals.

On today's program, we speak with Tulsa Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Keith Ballard, who --- like every other school system administrator across Oklahoma --- is working hard to deal with the new reality of reduced state expenditures for education. Indeed, such aid is now lower than it was four years ago. Less and less money for schools, teachers, classrooms, and textbooks means more and more to be alarmed about, according to Dr.

On today's show, a discussion of the nascent but rapidly growing "D.I.Y. fabrication movement" occurring in America today. Our guest is Dale Dougherty, the founder/publisher of Make Magazine (see makezine.com) --- and one of the leading voices in this movement. Our own Hardesty Center for Fab Lab Tulsa, which just opened for business a few months ago (and which is one of only 100 or so fab labs worldwide), is hosting the 2012 US Fab Lab Symposium here in T-Town, from April 10th through the 12th.

"What Teachers Make"

Apr 6, 2012

On today's show, we speak by phone with the noted performance poet, former middle-school teacher, and current teachers' advocate Taylor Mali. His new book --- "What Teachers Make: In Praise of the Greatest Job in the World" --- is based on a poem that he wrote several years ago, a spirited and encouraging defense of the teaching profession that has, by now, been seen and forwarded millions of times on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and elsewhere. It's a poem that gave heart to an entire movement --- and in this book we get the story of what drove Mali to compose that poem in the first place.

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