China

Our guest is Vanessa Hua, a columnist at the San Francisco Chronicle, who joins us to discuss her debut novel, "A River of Stars: A Novel." It's a powerful and moving saga of modern-day motherhood, immigration, and identity in which a pregnant Chinese woman makes her way to California (i.e., Los Angeles, and then San Francisco's Chinatown) in pursuit of the American dream. Per USA Today: "Hua's story spins with wild fervor, with charming protagonists fiercely motivated by maternal and survival instincts."

Now that it's been a week since the unprecedented (and, by many accounts, quite surreal) summit between President Donald Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un in Singapore, what are the main "takeaways" from that event? What did we learn? And what -- if anything -- did each individual actually gain or achieve? And what happens next? Our guest is Scott Snyder, a senior fellow for Korea studies and director of the program on U.S.-Korea policy at the Council on Foreign Relations.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Ambassador Husain Haqqani, who served as Pakistan's ambassador to the United States from 2008 to 2011. Now working as a Hudson Institute Senior Fellow, where he is also the Director for South and Central Asia, Haqqani is widely credited with managing a difficult American-Pakistani partnership during a critical phase in the global war on terrorism. He has, moreover, served as an advisor to four different Pakistani Prime Ministers; he is also co-editor of the journal Current Trends in Islamist Ideology.

Our guest on ST is David Shambaugh, the Director of the China Policy Program at George Washington University.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with Evan Osnos, a staff writer at The New Yorker who's also a fellow at the Brookings Institution as well as a contributor to This American Life and Frontline. His widely acclaimed book, "Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China" -- based on the eight years he spent living in Beijing -- won the 2014 National Book Award for Nonfiction. Osnos speaks with us in detail about this book, which was called a "splendid and entertaining picture of 21st-century China" by The Wall Street Journal.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in September.) Our guest is Erika Lee, who teaches history at the University of Minnesota, where she's also the Vecoli Chair in Immigration History and Director of the Immigration History Research Center. Lee tells us about her widely acclaimed book, "The Making of Asian America: A History" (Simon & Schuster). As was noted of this volume in the pages of The New York Times Book Review: "Sweeping....

Our guest on ST is Erika Lee, who teaches history at the University of Minnesota, where she's also the Vecoli Chair in Immigration History and Director of the Immigration History Research Center. Lee tells us about her widely acclaimed new book, "The Making of Asian America: A History" (Simon & Schuster). As noted in this book's Introduction: "The 19.5 million Asian Americans in the United States today make up almost 6 percent of the total U.S. population. They increased in number by 46 percent from 2000 to 2010 and are now the fastest-growing group in the country.

On this edition of ST, an interesting chat with political analyst Dean Cheng, who works at The Heritage Foundation as a senior research fellow on Chinese political and security affairs. A widely respected political writer and commentator, Cheng has appeared on National Public Radio, CNN International, BBC World Service, and elsewhere, and he recently gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations.

China -- where so much of the world's population has lived for thousands and thousands of years now, and where several of the world's most polluted cities can be found -- is now starting to transition from a mega-economy that's based on exporting to one that's based on domestic consumerism. What will this transition mean for that country's already-troubled environment? And how is it even possible -- from a soil or fertility perspective -- that parts of China have served as farmland for literally 3,000 years? On this installment of ST, we speak with Prof. Robert B.

On this installment of ST, we offer a discussion of how oil, coal, and other energy sources are influencing today's international geo-politics. Our guest is James Clad, a diversely experienced foreign-affairs and oil-policy expert who consults for various energy and investment firms worldwide. Clad is a senior adviser at the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA) in Arlington, Virginia, as well as an advisor to IHS Jane's and Cambridge Energy Research Associates (CERA). From 2002 to 2010, Clad served as U.S.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we're talking about the rise of China with David Shambaugh, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at George Washington University. Professor Shambaugh is a well-known authority on contemporary China and international relations within Asia, and his latest book is "China Goes Global: The Partial Power," which Foreign Affairs has called a "masterful survey." He gave an address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations last week, and he stopped by our Public Radio Tulsa studios while he was in town.

On this installment of ST, we welcome Dr. Elizabeth Colton, who's still pursuing an active, long-running, and wide-ranging career in diplomacy, journalism, foreign-relations scholarship, and U.S. and international politics and education. Such work has taken her to more than 100 countries; she's taught and/or delivered lectures on six different continents. Last night, Dr. Colton addressed to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations on the topic of "Foreign Policy Challenges for the New Administration" --- which will be, of course, in this case a second Obama Administration. Dr.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Eric Jay Dolin, the bestselling author and award-winning popular historian whose previous books include "Fur, Fortune, and Empire: The Epic History of the Fur Trade in America" and "Leviathan: The History of Whaling in America." Dolin's new book, which he discusses with us today, is "When America First Met China: An Exotic History of Tea, Drugs, and Money in the Age of Sail." On this Election Day, after so much stump-speech rhetoric concerning (among several other topics) "getting tough on China," we are taking the long view, so to speak, on thi

On this edition of on our program, we revisit a show that first aired back in March, when we spoke by phone with Michelle Dammon Loyalka, a freelance journalist and editor.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to a show that first aired in March, when we spoke by phone with Lisa See, the bestselling author of "Shanghai Girls," "Peony in Love," "Snow Flower and the Secret Fan," "Dragon Bones," and other novels, as well as an acclaimed memoir, "On Gold Mountain." See's latest book, now in paperback, is a novel called "Dreams of Joy" --- this is the book that she tells us about on today's program.

Today on our program we speak by phone with Michelle Dammon Loyalka, a freelance journalist and editor, who's just put out a new book (from the University of California Press) called "Eating Bitterness: Stories from the Front Lines of China's Great Urban Migration." Praised in Publishers Weekly as "a thorough and insightful examination of the gritty, arduous side of the Chinese economic miracle," this book profiles eight different migrant peasants in contemporary China --- an impossibly vast and rapidly changing country where, each year, some 200 million such migrants travel from the countr