Medicine

Medical Marijuana was approved by voters here in Oklahoma as recently as June of this year, yet so much is happening on this front -- medically, politically, economically, legislatively, etc. -- that it can be rather difficult to stay informed. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Jackie Fortier, the StateImpact Oklahoma reporter who covers health and medicine for KWGS, KGOU, KOSU, and other public radio outlets across the state. Fortier brings us up to speed on the fast-moving, far-reaching story that is Medical Marijuana in Oklahoma.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in December.) On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we share an interesting if rather alarming conversation with the award-winning science reporter and author Gary Taubes, whose latest book is "The Case Against Sugar." As was noted of this book by The Seattle Times: "Taubes sifts through centuries' worth of data.... Practically everything one wants to know about sugar -- its history, its geography, the addiction it causes -- is here. In the end, each of us is confronted with a choice.

On this edition of our program, we learn about "The Bleeding Edge," a new documentary film that recently started airing on Netflix. This film, directed by Kirby Dick, offers a detailed and unsettling look at the unforeseen consequences of various advanced technological devices that are routinely used by Big Medical today. Our guest is the producer of this film, Amy Herdy, who has worked in film -- specializing in social justice issues -- for more than twenty years.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Mike Scardino, whose debut memoir, just out, is "Bad Call: A Summer Job on a New York Ambulance." The book details his experiences working an ambulance job in Queens, New York, in the late '60s and early '70s. As per a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Fresh and powerful...Scardino looks back on his summers during college...when he worked as a New York City hospital ambulance attendant.

What's it like to be an "ER doc" in America today? And how has that job changed in recent decades? Paul Seward is our guest. Now retired, he was a physician for nearly fifty years, and he spent most of those years working in emergency rooms. He's just published a memoir, "Patient Care: Death and Life in the Emergency Room." As was noted of this volume by Booklist: "Seward's engrossing and approachable memoir plunges readers into the unpredictable life of an emergency-room physician.... His humble recollections are sad yet joyful, moving yet lighthearted.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dr. Ruth Potee, who is both a Family Physician and an Addiction Medicine Physician based in Greenfield, Mass. She's also the Medical Director for the Franklin County House of Corrections, the Franklin Recovery and Treatment Center, and the Pioneer Valley Regional School District. As such, Dr.

The Blue Zones Project will present a series of events here in Tulsa this week, and so, on this edition of ST Medical Monday, we listen back to a Blue Zones-related interview from our archives. In 2016, we spoke with one Tony Buettner. Several years ago, Tony's brother Dan executed the original Blue Zones study, and then wrote a bestselling book about same.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about Physicians for a National Health Program (or PNHP). This collective, per its website, is "a nonprofit research and education organization of 20,000 physicians, medical students, and health professionals who support single-payer national health insurance." Our guest is Dr. Ed Weisbart, who heads the Missouri Chapter of PNHP.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we revisit an interview that first aired in April with Dr. Daniela Lamas, author of "You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor’s Stories of Life, Death, and In Between." Per Publishers Weekly: "In this ruminative account of treating patients, Lamas, a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, analyzes how the critically ill manage life during and after treatment. She meets people who are neither bitter nor sorrowful about their conditions, but are constantly aware of their precarious states....

Our guest on ST is Dr. Sunil Aggarwal, who grew up in Oklahoma and is now based in the Seattle area. He's a medical marijuana expert who's also a clinical instructor at the University of Washington School of Medicine; his focus is on the use of cannabis in clinical practice, medical research, and education. Dr. Aggarwal holds degrees in medicine, medical geography, chemistry, philosophy, and religious studies. He'll be speaking in support of State Question 788 today (the 8th) here in Tulsa, and then he'll do so tomorrow (the 9th) in Norman, Oklahoma.

Our guest is Dr. Elisha Waldman, a pediatric palliative care physician now based in Chicago, who tells us about his new book. It's a memoir called "This Narrow Space: A Pediatric Oncologist, His Jewish, Muslim, and Christian Patients, and a Hospital in Jerusalem," and it chronicles -- in ways lyrical, bittersweet, and inspiring -- the seven years he spent as a pediatric oncologist in Jerusalem. While there, as we learn, Dr.

(Note: This interview originally aired in March.) It's often noted that health care in America is changing quickly and dramatically -- and that it is, moreover, in a state of crisis -- but can the same be said for therapy? Our guest is Dr. Enrico Gnaulati, a clinical psychologist based in California.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Katie Watson, an award-winning professor who has taught bioethics, medical humanities, and constitutional law for several years at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. She joins us to discuss her smart, well-balanced, and accessible new book, "Scarlet A: The Ethics, Law, and Politics of Ordinary Abortion." Per The Chicago Tribune, it "is a thoughtful and engaging consideration of one of this country's most controversial words: abortion." And further, from Louise P.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, a discussion about fighting opioid addiction at the individual, societal, and legal levels. Our guest is the successful OKC-based trial lawyer, Reggie Whitten. He'll be a co-lead counsel for the State of Oklahoma in an upcoming lawsuit against four different Big Pharma firms; that trial is set to begin in May of next year. Whitten's stake in the lawsuit is also quite personal; in 2002, he lost his son, Brandon, to a car accident triggered by Brandon's addiction to prescription drugs.

(Note: This show originally aired back in October.) Our guest on this installment of ST Medical Monday is Dr. Victoria Sweet, an associate clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, who's also a prize-winning historian and a Guggenheim Fellowship recipient. She joins us to discuss her book, "Slow Medicine: The Way to Healing." This work, part candid memoir and part well-informed critique, argues for an across-the-board "slowing down" of the practice of medicine in America.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dr. Daniela Lamas, author of "You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor’s Stories of Life, Death, and In Between." As was noted of this book by Publishers Weekly: "In this ruminative account of treating patients, Lamas, a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, analyzes how the critically ill manage life during and after treatment. She meets people who are neither bitter nor sorrowful about their conditions, but are constantly aware of their precarious states....

In the ongoing search for better treatment of mental health issues and illnesses, one crucial consideration is the trade-off between the effectiveness of a given treatment versus any unpleasant or damaging side-effects it might have. On this edition of ST, we are talking about one such treatment -- it's one that's actually been around for decades, but that is now being done in a much different (and far more nuanced) manner: electrical stimulation of the brain. Our guest is Dr. Hamed Ekhtiari, an associate investigator at the Laureate Institute for Brain Research (or LIBR) here in Tulsa.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, our guest is the writer, cancer survivor, entrepreneur, and former Tulsa resident, Paige Davis, who is also the author of a new memoir: "Here We Grow: Mindfulness Through Cancer and Beyond." Davis will be the keynote speaker at the upcoming symposium known as Celebrating the Art of Healing 2018: "The Future is Now." This all-day symposium will happen Saturday, April 28th, at the Town & Country School in Tulsa (at 8906 E. 34th Street).

(Note: This interview originally aired back in January.) On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we offer an interview that stems from three rather alarming facts. One: About 10 percent of Americans are implanted with medical devices (such as pacemakers, artificial hips, cardiac stents, and so on). Two: The overwhelming majority of high-risk implanted devices in the U.S. have never undergone a single clinical trial. And three: Medical interventions have become the third leading cause of death in America. What in the world, you might ask, is going on here?

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Barbara Lipska, Director of the Human Brain Collection Core at the National Institute of Mental Health, where she studies mental illness and human brain development. She joins us to discuss her engaging and disturbing new memoir, "The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind: My Tale of Madness and Recovery." As noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews: "A vibrant mental health expert's bout with brain cancer and the revolutionary treatments that saved her life....

(Note: This interview originally aired last year.) On this edition of ST Medical Monday, Dr. David Palma is our guest. He is a Canadian radiation oncologist and cancer researcher who focuses on the treatment of lung, head/neck, and metastatic cancers -- and he tells us about his new book, which is just out: "Taking Charge of Cancer: What You Need to Know to Get the Best Treatment." As was noted by Dr. Tony Mok of the Chinese University of Hong Kong: "If you use a guidebook for a journey, you will need [this book] for a cancer journey.

It's often noted that health care in America is changing quickly and dramatically -- and that it is, moreover, in a state of crisis -- but can the same be said for therapy? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Enrico Gnaulati, a clinical psychologist based in California.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, a conversation with Dr. Nadine Burke Harris, the founder and CEO of the Center for Youth Wellness, which is located in San Francisco's Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood. A well-regarded expert on how childhood stress can lead to adult disease, Dr. Harris speaks with us about her new book, "The Deepest Well." We also learn about how and why Dr. Harris -- a pediatrician by training -- was the subject of a game-changing 2011 profile in The New Yorker Magazine.

On this edition of our show, we listen back to a fine interview that originally aired in May of last year. At that time, our guest was Dr. Rachel Pearson, who told us about her memoir, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about "Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race," an exhibition that will be on view at The Sherwin Miller Museum of Jewish Art here in Tulsa through March 4th. As noted at the Sherwin Miller website, this traveling exhibit, presented by the U.S.

On this edition of ST Medical Mondauy, we speak with Jackie Fortier, the newly appointed Health Reporter for StateImpact Oklahoma, which is an ongoing collaboration between this state's public-radio stations: KGOU, KOSU, KWGS and KCCU. It's an initiative that aims to cover energy and the environment, education, health, and criminal justice -- as well as the intersection of government and everyday life in Oklahoma. Fortier, who relocated to our state from Colorado on taking her new post, tells us about some of the notable stories she's filed of late and about her own background.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we offer an interview that stems from three rather alarming facts. One: About 10 percent of Americans are implanted with medical devices (such as pacemakers, artificial hips, cardiac stents, and so on). Two: The overwhelming majority of high-risk implanted devices in the U.S. have never undergone a single clinical trial. And three: Medical interventions have become the third leading cause of death in America. What in the world, you might ask, is going on here?

(Note: This interview originally appeared in September of last year.) We offer a discussion about how what we eat affects not only our health and our mental state, but also our emotional disposition -- how food affects mood, as it were. Our guest is Dr. Leslie Korn, an expert in this regard. She's a clinician specializing in mental health nutrition and integrative medicine, and her newest book, just out, is "The Good Mood Kitchen." Dr.

Wait a sec -- is coffee good for you? Or bad? And what about chocolate -- should we avoid it, or does it actually have positive nutritional aspects? Tips about food can be confusing, as we all know, and things always seem to be in flux. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Aaron Carroll, who brings some stability (and sound advice) to these matters. Carroll is the author of a new book, "The Bad Food Bible: How and Why to Eat Sinfully." Dr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, a detailed discussion of how being "housing insecure" can seriously and negatively affect an individual's -- or a community's -- health and well-being. Our guest is Dr. Megan Sandel of Boston Medical Center, who is also an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health.

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