Nonfiction

Our guest is the award-winning British author and journalist William Atkins, whose new book -- a dense and engrossing blend of history, memoir, geography, and travel writing -- is called "The Immeasurable World: Journeys in Desert Places." It's a work that, per The Wall Street Journal, "courts comparisons with the capaciously learned nature writing of John McPhee. But there's also an open-ended spiritual quest to Mr.

(Note: This show originally aired back in March.) Our guest is Kim Brophey, a nationally certified and award-winning canine behavior consultant based in Asheville, North Carolina. She joins us to discuss her book, "Meet Your Dog: The Game-Changing Guide to Understanding Your Dog's Behavior." In this work, Brophey explains her so-called "L.E.G.S." approach -- as in, "Learning, Environment, Genetics, and Self."

It's taken a while for this particular truth to sink in, but America finally seems to be waking up to it: People with mental illness don't need to be locked up -- they need to be treated. On this edition of our show, we speak with journalist Alisa Roth, whose new book, "Insane," is a well-regarded and quite alarming exposé of the mental health crisis now facing our courts, jails, and prisons. As was noted  of this book by The New York Times Book Review: "Chilling.... Roth writes movingly of the human toll of incarceration....

Looking for a great book or three to relax with this summer? Of course you are. We've got lots of surefire suggestions on that score from Nancy Pearl, our longtime book reviewer here on StudioTulsa. A widely beloved literary critic, editor, author, and now-retired librarian -- and a former resident of Tulsa -- Nancy shares with us new and recent works of fiction, mystery, history, and more. Here, in order, are the books that she chats with us about:

1) "1947: Where Now Begins" by Elisabeth Asbrink

2) "Mozart's Starling" by Lyanda Lynn Haupt

(Note: This interview originally aired back in October.) What's it like to live on one-tenth of the fossil-fuel consumption of the average American? Alarmed by the drastic changes now occurring in the Earth's climate systems, our guest on today's ST -- who is a climate scientist and father of two -- decided to find out. And he's very glad he did. Peter Kalmus is our guest; he is an atmospheric scientist at Caltech / Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and he has a book out.

Our guest is Allen Gannett, the founder and CEO of TrackMaven, a software analytics firm whose clients have included Microsoft, Marriott, Home Depot, Aetna, and Honda.

(Note: This interview originally aired in January.) For a number of different -- and often unsettling -- reasons, issues of race and racism have by now come into focus in American life in a pervasive manner that we, as a society, have not seen in decades. Or maybe, actually, we as a nation have never been as racially aware, or as racially alert, as we are at this moment. Thus we're discussing an important textbook in this regard; "Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work for Racial Justice" first appeared back in the 1990s, and it has just been published in a new (fourth) edition.

(Note: This interview originally aired in December.) Our guest is the author and journalist Ted Genoways, who is a contributing editor at Mother Jones, The New Republic, and Pacific Standard. A fourth-generation Nebraskan, Genoways has a book out that profiles a subject near and dear to his heart. "This Blessed Earth: A Year in the Life of an American Family Farm" documents the lives and labors behind a small family farm located in York County, Nebraska.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in February.) The author and journalist Mark Whitaker is our guest on StudioTulsa. A former managing editor of CNN Worldwide, and a previous Washington bureau chief for NBC News, Whitaker has a new book out, which he tells us about.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we revisit an interview that first aired in April with Dr. Daniela Lamas, author of "You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor’s Stories of Life, Death, and In Between." Per Publishers Weekly: "In this ruminative account of treating patients, Lamas, a pulmonary and critical care doctor at the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, analyzes how the critically ill manage life during and after treatment. She meets people who are neither bitter nor sorrowful about their conditions, but are constantly aware of their precarious states....

Our guest is Danielle Allen, the James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard University, who joins us to discuss her new book. That well-regarded book, "Cuz: The Life and Times of Michael A.," is an unflinching memoir of Allen's late cousin as well as a detailed and accessible critique of America's criminal justice system. Per Jennifer Senior in The New York Times: "A compassionate retelling of an abjectly tragic story.... Among the most valuable contributions Allen makes is forcing us to ask: To what end are we locking up our children?

Our guest is Roger Thompson, a Tulsa native and nonfiction writer who also directs the Program in Writing and Rhetoric at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Formerly, Thompson was a wilderness canoe guide in Minnesota; later on, he founded an environmental program in Banff, Alberta, Canada. His newest book, which he told us about recently while visiting Tulsa, grew directly out his longtime appreciation of outdoor exploration.

(Note: This interview originally aired in March.) It's often noted that health care in America is changing quickly and dramatically -- and that it is, moreover, in a state of crisis -- but can the same be said for therapy? Our guest is Dr. Enrico Gnaulati, a clinical psychologist based in California.

Neurobiologist and primatologist Robert Sapolsky has spent his professional life attempting to understand the underpinnings and science behind human behavior, studying wild baboon populations as well as the complex workings of the human brain. The professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University and MacArthur Foundation "Genius Grant" recipient is the author of several books on various aspects of behavior -- and his latest, "Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worse," seems like a summation of his knowledge on the subject.

On this broadcast of ST, we learn about a new book called "Art Deco Tulsa" -- and our guests are the two people who created it: Suzanne Fitzgerald Wallis wrote the text, and Sam Joyner made the photographs. As is noted of this book at its publisher's website: "Transformed from a cattle depot into the Oil Capital of the World, Tulsa emerged as an iconic Jazz Age metropolis. The Magic City attracted some of the nation's most talented architects, including Bruce Goff, Francis Barry Byrne, Frank Lloyd Wright, Joseph R.

Our guest is the California-based seismologist, Dr. Lucy Jones, whose new book is "The Big Ones." It offers a bracing look at some of the history's greatest natural disasters, world-altering events whose reverberations we continue to feel today. At Pompeii, for example, Dr. Jones explores how a volcanic eruption in the first century AD challenged prevailing views of religion. Later in the book, she examines the California floods of 1862 and how they show that memory itself can change or fade over successive generations.

On this edition of ST, an interesting discussion with Hannibal B. Johnson, the Tulsa-based attorney, local historian, and prolific author. He joins us to talk about his newest book, which is just out: "The Sawners of Chandler: A Pioneering Power Couple in Pre-Civil Rights Oklahoma." As is noted of this compelling and eye-opening book at Mr.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, our guest is Dr. Nicole Washington, who has worked in the past as both an academic and community-based psychiatrist, and who's now on the staff at Family and Children's Services here in Tulsa. Dr. Washington also operates a private practice dedicated to helping high-level professionals deal with a variety of emotional and mental issues.

Our guest on ST is the best-selling and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Rick Bragg, who's known for his books "All Over but the Shoutin'" and "Ava's Man." His new book, which he tells us about, is "The Best Cook in the World." In this work, Bragg sets out to preserve his heritage as well as his family history by telling the stories that framed his mother's cooking, her upbringing, her education, her child-rearing, and so forth -- from her own childhood into old age. As Bragg tell us, in the American South just like everywhere else, good food always has a good story behind it.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is the remarkable Blondy Baruti, who grew up in a war-ravaged part of Africa, then came to the U.S. in order to become a professional basketballer, and actually ended up as a Hollywood movie star. And along the way, of course, he also played hoops at and attended the University of Tulsa. Baruti has a new autobiography out, which has been thus praised by Booklist: "What shines through here is Baruti's good heart, persistence, and absolute unwillingness to give up on his dreams despite repeated setbacks.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the first-ever Tulsa Lit.Fest, an impressive array of free-to-the-public events that will happen here in our community from tomorrow (the 19th) through Sunday (the 22nd).

(Please note: This show first aired back in December.) Artificial "machine" intelligence is, of course, a part of our lives now -- we have cruise control in our cars, automatic checkout services at the supermarket, and (most importantly?) those smartphones in our pockets. But what will life be like when artificial "sentient" intelligence becomes the norm? And when will that happen?

Our guest is the Tulsa-based author Joe Johnston, who's originally from Missouri, and who's written many books over the years on various topics. He joins us to talk about his newest publication, a folksy, far-ranging, and conversational history of Southern cooking -- from sun tea and fruitcake and vegetables to "the Colonel's chicken" and BBQ and beyond.

Our guest is Kim Brophey, a nationally certified and award-winning canine behavior consultant based in Asheville, North Carolina. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Meet Your Dog: The Game-Changing Guide to Understanding Your Dog's Behavior." In this work, Brophey explains her so-called "L.E.G.S." approach -- as in, "Learning, Environment, Genetics, and Self." As was noted of this book by Alexandre Rossi (the author of "A Dog at the Keyboard"): "It's refreshing to finally find a book that takes into consideration the many predispositions to behavior problems in dogs.

This coming Friday and Saturday, the 30th and 31st, the Helmerich Center for American Research here in Tulsa will present "Dislocations and Migrations," an interdisciplinary symposium of academics, activists, archivists, curators, librarians, and other experts -- all of them exploring ideas of displacement, departure, arrival, relocation, removal, escape, and so on. Our guest on ST, the journalist Jessica Bruder, will be the keynote speaker at this upcoming gathering.

(Note: This interview originally aired last year.) On this edition of ST Medical Monday, Dr. David Palma is our guest. He is a Canadian radiation oncologist and cancer researcher who focuses on the treatment of lung, head/neck, and metastatic cancers -- and he tells us about his new book, which is just out: "Taking Charge of Cancer: What You Need to Know to Get the Best Treatment." As was noted by Dr. Tony Mok of the Chinese University of Hong Kong: "If you use a guidebook for a journey, you will need [this book] for a cancer journey.

Our guest is the accomplished nonfiction writer, journalist, and essayist, Anna Badkhen, who is currently a Tulsa Artist Fellow at work on her first novel. She joins us to discuss her book, "Fisherman's Blues: A West African Community at Sea," a detailed and engaging volume just recently published. Per the Dallas Morning News: "In elegiac vignettes, Badkhen portrays the trick and snare of a heroic and punishing profession....

It's been commonly noted that we as human beings are basically hard-wired for long walks -- and for the thinking, observation, and spiritual reflection that always comes with such walks. Henry David Thoreau, for example, believed that walking alone through the woods was in itself a remedy for most of life's problems. Another such person might be the journalist and storyteller Steve Watkins, who's our guest on ST. In his new book, "Pilgrim Strong: Rewriting My Story on the Way of St.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is F. Diane Barth, a longtime psychotherapist based in New York City. She joins us to discuss her new book, "I Know How You Feel: The Joy and Heartbreak of Friendship in Women's Lives." As was noted of this readable and useful study by Kirkus Reviews: "A psychotherapist offers advice about how to be, and keep, a friend. Barth, whose Psychology Today blog frequently focuses on women's friendships, draws on interviews with diverse women to examine the 'magical, meaningful, and surprisingly difficult' connections they make with friends.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Eric Schlosser, the well-regarded American journalist and filmmaker whose bestselling books include "Fast Food Nation" (2001), "Reefer Madness" (2003), "Chew on This" (2006), and "Command and Control" (2013). This last-named title reveals the details of America's ongoing efforts to prevent nuclear weapons from being stolen, sabotaged, or detonated by accident.

Pages