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Fallin Won't Run Again

Gov. Mary Fallin says she will retire from politics when she steps down as governor in January and will not pursue elective office again. The Oklahoman reports that Fallin on Friday said she wants to spend more time with her family . The 63-year-old Republican has been in politics since she was 35, when she began serving as a state representative. Fallin later was elected the first female lieutenant governor, a position she held for 12 years. She then served in the U.S. House of...

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Broken Arrow Police-Facebook

Police Shoot Knife-Throwing Suspect in BA

Officers were dispatched to the 800 block of South Juniper Place in Broken Arrow to a domestic disturbance involving a knife on Saturday afternoon. The initial report information indicated two men were involved in a fight over a gun. Upon arrival, officers located an individual who stated he'd secured the firearm. At that time, officers saw another man come from behind a house nearly half a block east of them, armed with a knife. That individual, whose identity is not being released at this...

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University of Tulsa

Navy Sinks TU

Trump Blames Forest Management For Wildfires Again During California Visit

Updated at 10:00 p.m. ET President Trump visited fire-ravaged areas of California on Saturday, meeting with people affected by the wildfires. At least 76 people were killed in the Camp Fire in Northern California, and nearly 1,300 people have been reported missing, making it the most destructive and deadly wildfire in California state history. Trump traveled to the mountain town of Paradise, where many homes were burned to the ground. "Hopefully this is going to be the last of these because...

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On the Next All This Jazz: New & Recent Trumpet Music

Listen for the next All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 17th, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. Every Saturday night, both online and over the air, ATJ delivers three hours of recent and classic jazz, across a wide range of styles, from 9 o'clock till midnight. From John Coltrane to John Zorn, Chris Connor to Kris Davis, Dave Brubeck to Dave Douglas, and Gerry Mulligan to Geri Allen, All This Jazz is delighted by modern (and post-modern!) jazz in its many forms, and we love...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we get to know Ricco Wright, who owns and operates the nonprofit Black Wall Street Gallery, a recently created art space on Greenwood Avenue. After Wright graduated from Union High School, he studied mathematics as a Bill Gates Scholar at Langston University. Thereafter he earned a doctorate in math at Columbia University, after which he lived and worked in New York City for a decade. As Wright tells us, his own passion for the arts -- visual, musical, verbal, and otherwise -- flourished considerably while he was based in NYC.

News flash: Cats do not meow at random. Nor do they hiss because they have nothing better to do. Cat sounds do have a purpose -- and they can carry important messages. But what ARE those messages? Our guest on ST has some very interesting answers: Susanne Schötz, a professor at Lund University in Sweden, is part of a long-standing research program exploring how and why cats use vocal communication...with each other and with their human caretakers. Schötz has a new book out called "The Secret Language of Cats: How to Understand Your Cat for a Better, Happier Relationship."

(Note: This interview first aired late last year.) Our guest is Leslie Berlin, who is the Project Historian for the Silicon Valley Archives at Stanford University. Originally from Tulsa, Berlin has a book out that offers nothing less than the history of Silicon Valley. As was noted of this book by The New York Times: "[A] deeply researched and dramatic narrative of Silicon Valley's early years.... Meticulously told stories permit the reader to gain a nuanced understanding of the emergence of the broader technology ecosystem that has enabled Silicon Valley to thrive....

On this edition of our program, we're discussing a recent DHS-related proposal put forth by the Trump Administration as well as local efforts to challenge this proposal. The proposal in question would change the accepted ferderal definition of Public Charge, which is a term used by immigration officials to refer to certain legal immigrants who are able to receive government benefits like food assistance, housing assistance, and health care.

Photo by Erin Baiano

On the 100th anniversary of the end of "The War to End All Wars," the Tulsa Symphony will commemorate those lost in that war and all the wars that followed with a performance of Benjamin Britten's War Requiem. The work ingeniously combines the text of the Latin funeral mass with the war poetry of Wilfred Owen, a young British poet who served and died in the trenches of the First World War.

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Oh, The Places You'll Go: Toilet Signs Try To Help

51 minutes ago

The world is in a transitional toilet state.

Bathroom innovators are working on ways to make toilets cleaner, safer and better for the environment. In the meantime, there are many types of toilets in the world — and all those options can be confusing.

There's the Western-style toilet — the white porcelain throne with a built-in flusher. In some parts of the world, people might use a squat toilet, which usually involves planting your feet on either side and hovering over a toilet bowl that's set in to the ground. Or a toilet could just be a hole in the ground.

A painting by Pablo Picasso that was stolen from a Dutch museum six years ago may have resurfaced in Romania, prosecutors say.

In a 2012 heist, thieves entered the Kunsthal museum in Rotterdam and made off with seven works by masters including Henri Matisse, Claude Monet, Paul Gauguin – and Tête d'Arlequin, a 1971 painting by Picasso. Authorities put the work's value at about $900,000.

Until now, none of the works had been recovered, and most or all of them were thought to have been burned.

Republican Gov. Rick Scott has defeated Democratic incumbent Bill Nelson in the Florida Senate race after a protracted and contentious recount.

Following both a machine and hand recount — mandated by law given the very tight margin of less than 0.25 percentage points — Scott continued to lead Nelson by more than 10,000 votes out of more than eight million votes cast.

"I just spoke with Senator Bill Nelson, who graciously conceded, and I thanked him for his years of public service," said Scott in a statement issued by his campaign.

Despite frenetically campaigning, rallying and tweeting support for Republican candidates in the lead up to the election, President Trump didn't take any responsibility for the GOP's losses in the midterms elections in an interview with Fox News' Chris Wallace that aired on Sunday.

"I have people that won't vote unless I'm on the ballot, OK?" Trump said. "And I wasn't on the ballot."

Updated at 3:21 p.m. ET

After two recounts, a deluge of lawsuits and loaded political rhetoric, the 12-day election marathon in Florida is finally drawing to a close.

Chrissy Houlahan has done a lot with her industrial engineering degree over the last 30 years including serving in the Air Force, working in the aircraft manufacturing industry, being the COO of a sports apparel company and even teaching high school chemistry.

Houlahan says her science, technology, engineering and mathematics – or STEM – background has allowed her to be fluid in her career by helping her tackle everyday problems through a unique lens.

School shootings have taken a terrible human toll. They have also been a boon to the business of security technology.

Over the summer, Washington Post reporter John Woodrow Cox saw an array of items on display at an expo in Orlando, Fla. He and fellow reporter Steven Rich went on to investigate whether any of the technology being promoted and sold really helps save lives.

One minute, Seamus Hughes was reading the book Dragons Love Tacos to his son. A few minutes later, after putting him to bed, Hughes was back on his computer, stumbling on what could be one of the most closely guarded secrets within the U.S. government: The Justice Department may be preparing criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LAKSHMI SINGH, HOST:

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