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Tulsa Animal Welfare

Distemper Battle At Tulsa Animal Shelter

The City of Tulsa Animal Welfare staff is taking proactive measures to stop the spread of canine distemper virus following confirmation of several cases since late March, said Animal Welfare Manager Jean Letcher. “Three weeks ago, two dogs tested positive for the virus, and since then, more cases have surfaced. This is a new and challenging situation for us. TAW has not had a CDV outbreak in a decade,” Letcher said. “We have a very aggressive response strategy and intend to come out of this...

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Grandma Changed in Grandson's Death

A 50-year-old Oklahoma woman has been charged in her 5-year-old grandson's death last year while left in a hot car for hours while she was in a tribal casino. Officials say Alanna Jean Orr of Oklahoma City was arrested Friday following her indictment by a federal grand jury for second-degree felony murder by child neglect in Indian Country. Court records state Orr was caring for her grandson on June 21 when she went to the Kickapoo Casino in Harrah, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) east of...

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Prison For Forced Addiction Treatment? A Parent's 'Last Resort' Has Consequences

Robin Wallace thought her years of working as a counselor in addiction treatment gave her a decent understanding of the system. She has worked in private and state programs in Massachusetts and with people who were involuntarily committed to treatment. So in 2017, as her 33-year-old son, Sean Wallace, continued to struggle with heroin use — after years of coping with mental health issues and substance use — she thought she was making the right choice in forcing him into treatment. "His...

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On the Next All This Jazz: Recorded Live in Paris

Listen for All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 20th, right here on KWGS-FM / Public Radio Tulsa. Every Saturday night, both online and over the air, ATJ delivers three hours of recent and classic jazz -- across a wide range of styles -- from 9 o'clock till midnight. From Paul Chambers to Paul Desmond, Woody Herman to Woody Shaw, Bill Evans to Bill Frisell, and Mary Lou Williams to Mary Halvorson, All This Jazz is delighted by modern (and post-modern!) jazz in its many forms, and we...

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Confronting An Ugly Past

StudioTulsa

This coming Saturday (the 20th) will bring a free, day-long Earth Day Celebration to the Guthrie Green in downtown Tulsa; the gathering is to be presented by Tulsa Earth Coalition, Green Country Sierra Club, and OK Roots Music -- and a full schedule is posted here.

Has the Trump Administration strengthened our nation's position on the global stage -- or are we now, as a country, weaker in terms of international geopolitics? On this broadcast of ST, we welcome James Lindsay, Senior Vice President at the Council on Foreign Relations, where he oversees the work of the more than six dozen fellows in the David Rockefeller Studies Program. Lindsay is considered a leading authority on the American foreign policy-making process and on the domestic politics of U.S. foreign policy.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Carol Haralson. A former citizen of Tulsa, she is an award-winning book designer now based in Arizona. She's designed several striking book jackets over the years, across a range of literary genres. And Haralson's now written a book of her own -- a blend of memoir, fiction, poetry, personal essay, and photography titled "At the Far End of O Street." She'll appear tomorrow night, Wednesday the 17th, at a free reading and signing at Magic City Books (beginning at 7pm).

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Lori Gottlieb, who tells us about her bestselling new memoir, "Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, HER Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed." As was noted of this book by a critic writing for The New York Times: "Gottlieb's book is perhaps the first I've read that explains the therapeutic process in no-nonsense terms while simultaneously giving hope to therapy skeptics like me who think real change through talk is elusive." And further, per The Washington Post: "Who could resist watching a therapist grapple with the same questions her patients have

We chat with the acclaimed English conductor Matthew Halls, who will be the Guest Conductor for the next Tulsa Symphony Orchestra concert, happening tomorrow night (the 13th) at the Tulsa PAC. The program will feature Rachmaninoff's "Symphonic Dances" as well as works by Strauss and Piazolla. More on this concert is posted here.

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Jade Bird Debuts Self-Titled Album

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SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

Finally today, some music.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SOMETHING AMERICAN")

JADE BIRD: (Singing) You don't call me now, and I don't think too much about you. But when she's not around, I can feel you're lonely. Oh, I can feel you're lonely somehow.

PFEIFFER: That's Jade Bird singing one of her breakthrough songs, "Something American." She's 21 but sings like a much older soul. And although her musical interests are diverse, she often gets described as a country and Americana musician. That's even though she's British.

SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

Finally today, some music.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SOMETHING AMERICAN")

JADE BIRD: (Singing) You don't call me now, and I don't think too much about you. But when she's not around, I can feel you're lonely. Oh, I can feel you're lonely somehow.

PFEIFFER: That's Jade Bird singing one of her breakthrough songs, "Something American." She's 21 but sings like a much older soul. And although her musical interests are diverse, she often gets described as a country and Americana musician. That's even though she's British.

SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

Finally today, some music.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SOMETHING AMERICAN")

JADE BIRD: (Singing) You don't call me now, and I don't think too much about you. But when she's not around, I can feel you're lonely. Oh, I can feel you're lonely somehow.

PFEIFFER: That's Jade Bird singing one of her breakthrough songs, "Something American." She's 21 but sings like a much older soul. And although her musical interests are diverse, she often gets described as a country and Americana musician. That's even though she's British.

Christians around the world gathered on Sunday to mark the end of Holy Week and celebrate Easter.

Festivities took on many forms. While some worshipers reenacted the Passion of the Christ, others gathered for candle-lit services or colorful processions.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

At least 200 people have been killed and hundreds more wounded in eight blasts across Sri Lanka. The coordinated bombings targeted luxury hotels and churches in the country. Joining us now to discuss the latest news is journalist Lisa Fuller, who joins us from Colombo. Lisa, what have you seen there on the ground?

On a bright Sunday afternoon in early March, the Tamir River in the steppes of Mongola becomes a bowling alley. Two dozen Mongolian herdsmen have gathered to play musun shagai, known as "ice shooting." Right now, the ice on the river is perfect. Clear and smooth. The players are cheerful and focused.

Their goal? To send a small copper puck called a zakh down a 93-yard stretch of ice and knock over several cow ankle bones, painted red, none bigger than a golf ball, at the other end. Extra points for hitting the biggest target, made of cow skin.

Updated at 12:53 a.m. ET Monday

Nearly 300 people were killed and hundreds more wounded after explosions tore through Sri Lanka in a series of coordinated blasts that struck three churches and three hotels. It marked the country's worst violence since the end of its civil war in 2009.

Police spokesman Ruwan Gunasekara said Monday the death toll had risen to 290 dead with more than 500 wounded, according to The Associated Press.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

At least 200 people have been killed and hundreds more wounded in eight blasts across Sri Lanka. The coordinated bombings targeted luxury hotels and churches in the country. Joining us now to discuss the latest news is journalist Lisa Fuller, who joins us from Colombo. Lisa, what have you seen there on the ground?

The Iowa caucuses are still nine months away, and with at least 20 Democrats either considering a run or officially declared, many of them are looking for ways to stand out in the crowded field. One tried-and-true way: show up in voters' homes.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

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