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Nowata Sheriff Resigns in Jail Conditions Dispute

The Nowata County Sheriff and several deputies resigned Monday over ongoing problems with the county jail. A judge ordered Sheriff Terry Barnett to return prisoners to the jail, which was evacuated last month over a carbon monoxide leak. Barnett said it hasn’t been fixed. "When I was elected, I said I would do the right thing. I was hopeful to see change in Nowata County, but now I see without support, it is only continuing to create a dangerous situation," Barnett said. An audit by Tulsa...

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Matt Trotter / KWGS

Tulsa City Council Meetings on Equality Indicators to Start in May

Public meetings on Tulsa’s Equality Indicators will begin in mid-May. City councilors agreed last week to hold four special meetings to look into racial disparities in policing identified in the report. Meeting dates have not been finalized. Each special meeting will follow an abbreviated regular council meeting. Those are held Wednesdays at 5 p.m. The special meetings will feature a panel of experts and professionals the council will hear from and ask questions of. The council will receive...

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Major Flooding In The Midwest Leaves 2 Dead, 2 Missing

In parts of the Midwest, floodwaters are starting to abate. But elsewhere, they're still rising. In Iowa and Nebraska, hundreds of homes are flooded. There are lakes where fields and roads should be. Local police departments are sending out motorboats instead of squad cars. Hornick, Iowa, resident Dale Ronfeldt's basement is flooded with 4 feet of water, Iowa Public Radio reports . "My washer and dryer are floating around down there somewhere," Ronfeldt said. A flood warning is in effect...

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Join Us for The Give & Take on Medicaid Expansion, The Oklahoma Plan, SB 605, and House Bill 1750

StudioTulsa

Photo by Bernie Guzik

Our guest is the locally based musician and photographer, Bernie Guzik. As a tuba player, the Ohio-born Guzik, who attended Julliard, has peformed with the New York Philharmonic, the American Symphony Orchestra, the Cleveland Orchestra, the Kansas City Philharmonic, the Tulsa Philharmonic, the Tulsa Symphony, and so forth. Now retired from music, he devotes more and more time to his other longtime passion: photography. Guzik tells us about this passion, which has led him to travel all over the world, documenting vanishing cultures with his camera.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Rubén Rengel, the 22-year-old Venezuelan violinist who won the 2018 Sphinx Competition, which is held annually for talented Black and Latino string players. Rengel will appear in Tulsa on Saturday night, the 16th, with the Signature Symphony at TCC. (More info and details on tickets are here.) On the program, Tchaikovsky's Concerto for Violin in D major, op. 35, which is a feature for Rengel, as well as Amy Beach's Symphony in E minor (a/k/a "the Gaelic").

Our guest is César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández, an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Denver. On Thursday the 14th, beginning at 6pm, he'll deliver the 19th Annual Buck Colbert Franklin Memorial Civil Rights Lecture on the TU campus. He'll speak on "Migrating to Prison: Immigration in the Age of Mass Incarceration," which is also the title of his forthcoming book. His academic interests center on "crimmigration law" -- meaning, the convergence of criminal law and immigration law. His previous book, "Crimmigration Law," was published by the American Bar Association in 2015.

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Our guest is John Brennan, the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency, where he served from 2013 to 2017. Previously a deputy national security advisor and assistant to President Barack Obama for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, Brennan today speaks to various audiences about how to both think of and respond to global events, terrorism, and cybersecurity concerns.

Faculty and fellows participating in the HEAL Initiative in Hinche, Haiti. (UC-San Francisco)

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, an interesting discussion of global health -- that is, thinking about the health and well-being of the world's populations in a global context, and moreover, about how to serve those populations by improving care (and achieving equity of care) for all people. It's about seeing health care as a basic human right, and thus as something that people all over the world are fully entitled to. Our guest is Dr. Phuoc Le of the University of California at San Francisco, who also teaches in the public health program at UC-Berkeley. Dr.

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AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Fans and fellow musicians today are remembering the king of the surf guitar. Dick Dale died Saturday at the age of 81. He and his band, the Del-Tones, are credited with recording the first surf instrumental to hit the charts, "Let's Go Trippin'." It's about cars, not drugs.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LET'S GO TRIPPIN'")

DICK DALE AND THE DEL-TONES: Let's go trippin'.

CHANG: Dick Dale's sound inspired legions of musicians from the 1960s to today. NPR's Tom Cole has this appreciation.

A white suburban police officer goes on trial in Pittsburgh on Tuesday for fatally shooting an unarmed black teenager last summer.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a new law which will allow the punishment of individuals and online media for spreading what Russia calls "fake news" and information which "disrespects" the state.

High-ranking Democrats on Capitol Hill are calling for a counterintelligence investigation into a woman who has peddled access to President Trump and who founded the massage parlor where New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft is accused of soliciting sex.

Japan Is Betting Big On The Future Of Hydrogen Cars

5 hours ago

It may feel like the electric car has been crowned the future of transportation.
Auto companies have plans to make more electric car models, and sales — still only a tiny fraction of the overall market — are expected to get a boost as more countries pass regulations to reduce carbon emissions. But Japan isn't sure that the battery electric car is the only future, and it's betting big on something it says makes more sense in big cities: hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Fans and fellow musicians today are remembering the king of the surf guitar. Dick Dale died Saturday at the age of 81. He and his band, the Del-Tones, are credited with recording the first surf instrumental to hit the charts, "Let's Go Trippin'." It's about cars, not drugs.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LET'S GO TRIPPIN'")

DICK DALE AND THE DEL-TONES: Let's go trippin'.

CHANG: Dick Dale's sound inspired legions of musicians from the 1960s to today. NPR's Tom Cole has this appreciation.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Fans and fellow musicians today are remembering the king of the surf guitar. Dick Dale died Saturday at the age of 81. He and his band, the Del-Tones, are credited with recording the first surf instrumental to hit the charts, "Let's Go Trippin'." It's about cars, not drugs.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LET'S GO TRIPPIN'")

DICK DALE AND THE DEL-TONES: Let's go trippin'.

CHANG: Dick Dale's sound inspired legions of musicians from the 1960s to today. NPR's Tom Cole has this appreciation.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Fans and fellow musicians today are remembering the king of the surf guitar. Dick Dale died Saturday at the age of 81. He and his band, the Del-Tones, are credited with recording the first surf instrumental to hit the charts, "Let's Go Trippin'." It's about cars, not drugs.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LET'S GO TRIPPIN'")

DICK DALE AND THE DEL-TONES: Let's go trippin'.

CHANG: Dick Dale's sound inspired legions of musicians from the 1960s to today. NPR's Tom Cole has this appreciation.

A decade ago, the U.S. government claimed that ditching paper medical charts for electronic records would make health care better, safer and cheaper.

Ten years and $36 billion later, the digital revolution has gone awry, an investigation by Kaiser Health News and Fortune magazine has found.

Veteran reporters Fred Schulte of KHN and Erika Fry of Fortune spent months digging into what has happened as a result. (You can read the cover story here.)

Updated at 5:44 p.m. ET

Darrell Blatchley received a call from the Philippines' Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources early Friday morning reporting that it had a young Cuvier's beaked whale that was weak and vomiting blood.

Within a few hours it was dead.

Blatchley, a marine biologist and environmentalist based in the Philippine city of Davao, gathered his team to drive two hours to where the whale had washed up.

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