Top Stories

Whitney Bryen-Oklahoma Watch

Oklahoma Jails Begin Collecting DNA from Arrestees

With no announcement, Oklahoma jails are beginning to collect DNA from individuals arrested on felony charges – the first step in implementing a controversial state law passed two years ago. So far, hundreds of jail inmates have had the insides of their cheeks swabbed, and the samples have been forwarded to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation, which soon will analyze and upload the genetic profiles to a national FBI database. The goal is to connect arrestees to unsolved crimes, which...

Read More
University of Tulsa

Former University of Tulsa Student Sentenced for Assault

A 19-year-old former University of Tulsa student has been sentenced to five years in prison after pleading guilty to sexually assaulting three women on campus. Zach Ryan Martin pleaded guilty Thursday to four counts of sexual battery for events that occurred between September 2017 and December 2017. Tulsa County District Judge William LaFortune also sentenced Martin to an additional five years of probation for each charge, which will be served concurrently. Martin's attorney, Trevor Reynolds,...

Read More

Wolves Are Back In Germany, But Not Always Welcome

Wolves are making a big comeback in Germany, which is making some Germans uneasy. Farmers and hunters drove the species out of the country over 150 years ago, but conditions for wolves became more welcoming in 1990, after Germany's reunification extended European endangered species protections to the eastern part of the country. Since 2000, the Central European gray wolves have been moving back, mostly from Poland . In Brandenburg state, which surrounds Berlin, the number of known wolf packs...

Read More

Support Public Radio AND our National Forests!

Winter Arrives on All This Jazz

Dig the next All This Jazz, beginning at 9pm on Saturday the 15th, right here on Public Radio 89.5 KWGS...and online via our "Listen Live" stream at PublicRadioTulsa.org . The program delivers three hours of recent and classic jazz music, across a range of styles, each and every Saturday night, from 9 o'clock till midnight. (We also offer a 7pm re-airing of ATJ on Sunday evenings, on Jazz 89.5-2, which is Public Radio Tulsa's all-jazz HD Radio channel.) From Chico Hamilton to Chico Freeman,...

Read More

StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST, we offer another Museum Confidential podcast (which is a podcast co-created twice monthly by our own Scott Gregory and Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum). This time around, Museum Confidential speaks with author Mary Gabriel about her new and much-praised group biography, which digs deeply into the post-WII New York art world.

Our guest is Tim Sharp, who has for several years now served as both Artistic Director and Conductor of the Tulsa Oratorio Chorus. He tells us about the newest TOC concert, "Russian Choral Classics," which will happen on Friday night (the 14th) at 7:30pm in Holy Family Cathedral (in downtown Tulsa). The evening will offer a cappella choral works -- both sacred and secular -- by Chesnokov, Grechaninov, Rachmaninov, and others. For more information, or to purchase tickets, please go here.

What happens when we as a society stop trusting our experts, stop consulting our longtime scholars, and stop listening to our intelligence-community professionals? What happens to our foreign policy? How are this nation's relationships with the rest of the world affected? How is our government itself altered? Our guest on ST is the conservative writer and scholar, Tom Nichols, who is also a Professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College.

Albert Bierstadt, Buffalo Hunt, 1860. Oil on canvas, Private Collection, image courtesy of Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Our guest is Laura Fry, the Senior Curator and Curator of Art at Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. She is also one of the curators of a striking new show at that museum, which she tells us about. Per the Gilcrease website: "Gilcrease Museum and the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming, have partnered to present the groundbreaking exhibition 'Albert Bierstadt: Witness to a Changing West.' Albert Bierstadt (1830–1902) is best known as one of America's premier western landscape artists.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Teresa Carr, a journalist who wrote the cover story for the January 2019 issue of Consumer Reports. As this in-depth article (titled "Medical Screening Tests You Do and Don't Need") notes near the outset: "Today, as we've learned more about how to detect disease early, there are scores of blood tests, ultrasounds, and CT scans to screen for conditions like cancer and low bone density.

More StudioTulsa

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

More than four millennia after being chiseled by Egyptian artisans, the intricate hieroglyphics and stone carvings of an ancient tomb have been uncovered.

Egyptian officials made the announcement Saturday at the site of the discovery in Saqqara, outside of Cairo, according to multiple media reports. Photographs of the tomb show a narrow doorway leading to a rectangular room, its walls covered with carved symbols, images and human forms. Particularly striking are their well-preserved colors – light yellows, rich blues and a reddish-brown skin tone.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Friday night's rainfall in Washington, D.C., has elevated 2018 to the wettest year on record for the nation's capital, and the rain is expected to continue throughout the weekend.

The National Weather Service announced the rainfall record was surpassed at 6:26 a.m. on Saturday. So far, 61.34 inches of rain have fallen in Washington this year, breaking a record set in 1889 of 61.33 inches.

An additional inch or so of rain may fall through Sunday, pushing the tally even higher.

President Trump called a Friday ruling striking down the Affordable Care Act "Great news for America!" Democratic lawmakers rushed to decry the decision, calling it "monstrous" and "harmful." And Republican lawmakers remained mostly quiet Saturday.

In September 2016, the town of East Liverpool, Ohio, captured national attention when a photo of a local couple's overdose went viral. It showed a woman and her boyfriend sprawled comatose in the front seats of a car, while the woman's 4-year-old grandson sat in the back. The image was originally posted by the local police department. Overnight, East Liverpool, a town of just over 11,000 people, became the face of the opioid crisis enveloping parts of the country.

Famed singer Nancy Wilson died this past Thursday at the age of 81. In addition to her accomplished artistic career, Wilson was the host of Jazz Profiles, a long-running NPR series which dove deeply into the history of that singular art form. In remembrance of Nancy, Jazz Profiles lead producer Tim Owens recalls the show's founding, and shares some of its most memorable episodes.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Pages