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Oklahoma Spending Half of What CDC Recommends on Tobacco Prevention, Fourth-Best in U.S.

Oklahoma is spending more on tobacco prevention. State spending this fiscal year is $21.3 million, up more than 12 percent from last year. Oklahoma ranks fourth in the U.S. for percentage of tobacco prevention funding recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Even at that, it’s still only spending about half of what the CDC recommends that the state spends on tobacco prevention. So, there’s still room for improvement even though it’s doing better than most states," said...

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Tulsa Fire Department

Study Will Look at How Tulsa Firefighters' Physical Ability Test Relates to On-The-Job Injuries

University of Tulsa researchers and the Tulsa Fire Department want to know whether firefighters’ annual physical ability test can predict and prevent injuries. Over three years, they’ll look at whether scores on job-specific tests like stair climbs, hose drags and dummy rescues are predictors of injuries and how they relate to laboratory measures of fitness. "Is it heavily correlated or associated with anaerobic and aerobic fitness, or strength and power — whole-body strength and power —...

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The Education Department Is Canceling $150 Million Of Student Loan Debt

The U.S. Department of Education is sending emails to about 15,000 people across the country telling them: You've got money. These are former students — and some parents of students — who took out loans for colleges that shut down between Nov. 1, 2013, and Dec. 4, 2018. About half attended campuses run by Corinthian Colleges . They will get their money back or have their debt forgiven — an amount estimated at $150 million, all told — under a provision called Automatic Closed School Discharge....

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Support Public Radio AND our National Forests!

Winter Arrives on All This Jazz

Dig the next All This Jazz, beginning at 9pm on Saturday the 15th, right here on Public Radio 89.5 KWGS...and online via our "Listen Live" stream at PublicRadioTulsa.org . The program delivers three hours of recent and classic jazz music, across a range of styles, each and every Saturday night, from 9 o'clock till midnight. (We also offer a 7pm re-airing of ATJ on Sunday evenings, on Jazz 89.5-2, which is Public Radio Tulsa's all-jazz HD Radio channel.) From Chico Hamilton to Chico Freeman,...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of ST, we offer another Museum Confidential podcast (which is a podcast co-created twice monthly by our own Scott Gregory and Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum). This time around, Museum Confidential speaks with author Mary Gabriel about her new and much-praised group biography, which digs deeply into the post-WII New York art world.

Our guest is Tim Sharp, who has for several years now served as both Artistic Director and Conductor of the Tulsa Oratorio Chorus. He tells us about the newest TOC concert, "Russian Choral Classics," which will happen on Friday night (the 14th) at 7:30pm in Holy Family Cathedral (in downtown Tulsa). The evening will offer a cappella choral works -- both sacred and secular -- by Chesnokov, Grechaninov, Rachmaninov, and others. For more information, or to purchase tickets, please go here.

What happens when we as a society stop trusting our experts, stop consulting our longtime scholars, and stop listening to our intelligence-community professionals? What happens to our foreign policy? How are this nation's relationships with the rest of the world affected? How is our government itself altered? Our guest on ST is the conservative writer and scholar, Tom Nichols, who is also a Professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College.

Albert Bierstadt, Buffalo Hunt, 1860. Oil on canvas, Private Collection, image courtesy of Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Our guest is Laura Fry, the Senior Curator and Curator of Art at Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. She is also one of the curators of a striking new show at that museum, which she tells us about. Per the Gilcrease website: "Gilcrease Museum and the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming, have partnered to present the groundbreaking exhibition 'Albert Bierstadt: Witness to a Changing West.' Albert Bierstadt (1830–1902) is best known as one of America's premier western landscape artists.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Teresa Carr, a journalist who wrote the cover story for the January 2019 issue of Consumer Reports. As this in-depth article (titled "Medical Screening Tests You Do and Don't Need") notes near the outset: "Today, as we've learned more about how to detect disease early, there are scores of blood tests, ultrasounds, and CT scans to screen for conditions like cancer and low bone density.

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You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

The Education Department hatches plan to fix troubled TEACH grant

The Education Department plans to erase debt for thousands of teachers whose TEACH grants were converted to loans, after an almost year-long NPR investigation into the troubled federal program.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Updated at 8:35 p.m. ET

President Trump said Friday evening that Mick Mulvaney, his director of the Office of Management and Budget, will be the acting White House chief of staff.

It's unclear how long Mulvaney will serve in the role, succeeding outgoing chief of staff John Kelly. Trump announced on Dec. 8 that Kelly would leave at the end of the year.

Come 2020, Memorial Day weekend in Washington, D.C., will be a whole lot quieter.

Rolling Thunder, the veterans advocacy group that organizes a massive annual motorcycle ride through the nation's capital, announced this week that the gathering in 2019 will be its last big rally.

The sound of thousands of motorcycles rumbling through the city has been a staple of the holiday weekend for decades.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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'Tax Liens' Mean Towns Win, Homeowners Lose

13 hours ago

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Create and star in a blockbuster hip-hop musical, and you get to do pretty much anything you want. For Lin-Manuel Miranda, the playwright and composer behind Hamilton and In the Heights, that means starring in the sequel to a hallowed Disney classic.

In Pennsylvania, People Lined Up For Free Naloxone

13 hours ago

David Braithwaite was standing next to his pickup truck Thursday in a parking lot outside the Cumberland County health center in Carlisle, Pa.

He's a chaplain for Carlisle Truck Stop Ministry. His hat even says it.

Braithwaite said he and another chaplain minister to truck drivers, homeless people and anyone else who needs help at the truck stop seven days a week.

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