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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Oklahoma's 7-Day COVID Average Stays Above 1,300 after Record-Breaking Weekend

The Oklahoma State Department of Health reported on Monday 663 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state's total to 117,399. New case counts on Mondays are typically lower than other days. On Saturday, the state set another record for new cases, with 1,829. That broke the previous high of 1,628 set on Thursday. Tulsa County had 108 of Monday's cases. Its total now stands at 21,692, second to Oklahoma County's 23,726. The state's seven-day average of new cases, which shows the trend in...

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Matt Trotter / KWGS

Oklahoma Raising Unemployment Taxes for 2021

Oklahoma employers will be paying more in unemployment taxes next year. The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission is raising the rate from a range of 0.01 to 5.5% to a range of 0.03 to 7.5%. OESC Executive Director Shelley Zumwalt told lawmakers during an interim study last week higher rates may not be enough on their own to keep the state’s unemployment trust fund solvent. "The fund is predicted to receive $550 million to $600 million from employer fees in calendar year 2021. The fund has...

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Outspent In The Homestretch, Trump Campaign Says Its Ground Game Is Stronger

President Trump is closing out his campaign for reelection way behind in fundraising and trailing in the polls, both nationally and key swing states. Nearly 60 million people have already voted and time is running out before Nov. 3, Election Day. His campaign claims to be in a good position, citing an army of volunteers and the large crowds Trump has drawn even in the middle of a pandemic with surging coronavirus cases. But you don't need a top secret campaign memo to see where Trump is...

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On the Next All This Jazz: Live Dates from Ellis Marsalis, Billie Holiday, Archie Shepp, and More

Join us for All This Jazz on Saturday night, the 24th, right here on KWGS-FM / Public Radio Tulsa. It'll be three solid hours of can't-miss modern/recent/classic jazz, from 9pm till midnight! And in the 3rd and thematic hour of our show, running from 11pm to 12am, our theme will be Live Recordings . Hearing live music at a concert hall, nightclub, festival, or the like can be, alas, an experience that’s hard to come by these days…. But we can (and we will!) still gather here in Radioland to...

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StudioTulsa

SOPA Images / LightRocket via Getty [at NPR.org]

Our guest is Dr. Dan Caldwell, a Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Pepperdine University. He recently gave a private, online-only address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (TCFR) on the topic of "What Would a Biden Foreign Policy Be?" Dr. Caldwell now helps to coordinate the campaign activities of a group of national security and foreign policy professionals who have endorsed Vice-President Biden in his bid for the White House. Over the years, Dr. Caldwell has taught at the Naval Postgraduate School, Stanford, UCLA, and Brown University.

Our guest is Jared Yates Sexton, whose writing has included books and articles on politics, culture, and social justice, as well as works of fiction; he's an associate professor of creative writing at Georgia Southern University. He joins us to discuss his new book, which argues that the idea of "American exceptionalism" is not only false -- but it's been false since the country was founded.

(Note: This discussion first aired back in June.) What happens when a woman seeking an abortion in the U.S. is turned away? Our guest is Diana Greene Foster, PhD, who set out to answer this question as definitively as possible.

We welcome Sarah Smarsh back to StudioTulsa for a discussion of her new book. It's a collection of essays that all focus on a certain country-music icon who also happens to be one of the most unifying figures in American culture: Dolly Parton. Smarsh talks with us about how Parton has, for decades now, both embodied and emboldened American women who live and work in poverty. Few other musical artists, the author argues, seem as truly **genuine** as Parton, and few can match her gift for telling powerful stories about life, love, men, family, hard times, and surviving.

In late 2015, Zac Easter, a young man from a small town in Iowa, took his own life. The reason? According to the many journals and detailed writings that Zac left behind, this act of suicide was chosen by Zac because he was unable to continue his long-running battle against worsening traumatic brain injuries -- injuries that stemmed directly from the fact that Zac had been a football player, from third grade through high school.

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Stay out.

It's what people are being asked to tell each other. Less than 10 days ago, London banned people who live in different households from meeting each other indoors, to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

"Nobody wants to see more restrictions, but this is deemed to be necessary in order to protect Londoners' lives," London Mayor Sadiq Khan told the London Assembly.

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

Stocks on Monday were heading for their worst day since early September amid a surge in coronavirus cases in the United States and Europe and declining optimism about another U.S. pandemic relief bill.

By early afternoon, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was down more than 800 points, a decline of nearly 3%, and had lost ground for the month of October. The other major indexes were also down, though not as much.

When COVID-19 forced New York City into lockdown in March, Harlem chef and restaurateur Marcus Samuelsson had a choice: stay or go. Born in Ethiopia and raised by adoptive parents in Sweden, Samuelsson says leaving the city during the pandemic "would be the easier way out."

But he decided to stay.

For people who are itching to travel, airlines are working hard to offer reassurance. They're requiring masks, disinfecting airplane cabins between flights and using hospital-grade HEPA air filtration systems. Airlines are also touting a recent study that shows that modern aircraft ventilation systems help prevent the spread of the coronavirus and suggests the probability of spreading and contracting the coronavirus on even a packed airline flight is low.

A police officer who shot and killed a young Black man and injured the man's girlfriend during a traffic stop last week in Waukegan, Ill., has been fired. City officials are expected to release police video of the encounter, which could come as soon as this week.

State and local officials attended a vigil Sunday in Waukegan, where attendees paid tribute to the deceased, Marcellis Stinnette, 19, and Tafara Williams, who is recovering from injuries sustained last week.

Sam Smith is known for their soulful voice and its satin falsetto. But the singer's lyrics, whether in a ballad or a bop, aren't just about loving or losing others: They're also about the love of the genuine, the true, the self. The artist joined NPR's Scott Simon to talk about their new album, Love Goes, out Oct. 30. Hear the radio version at the audio link, and read on for an edited transcript.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Police arrested 11 people Sunday in New York City after fights erupted in Times Square as a large Jews for Trump convoy rolled through. Skirmishes broke out after some counterdemonstrators yanked flags off vehicles – and some drivers and passengers got out of their cars.

The clashes were caught on video and posted to social media, showing frequent outbursts of violence as people shouted threats at each other. At least one car had red paint thrown on it.

Nov. 3 promises to be an Election Day unlike any other, and public safety entities say they're preparing for tensions and the possibility of violence.

Poll workers are usually the first line of defense in case of disputes between voters, though they may be backed up by private security guards. Some local election authorities say they'll be adding guards, and Washington state's King County says it will post guards to ballot drop boxes that in other years have been unattended.

Nellie Riether, a single mom from Ringwood, N.J., faces a stark choice: raid her retirement savings or uproot her kids from home and move in with her sister.

"To be honest, it's mortifying and embarrassing at 46 years old to say I'm going to have to move in with my sister," she says. "Emotionally, it's a bit of a failure."

Riether has been out of work since April, when she was furloughed from her job in office building design. She can't pay the rent much longer, and she's worried about her kids, who are 13 and 15.

President Trump is closing out his campaign for reelection way behind in fundraising and trailing in the polls, both nationally and key swing states. Nearly 60 million people have already voted and time is running out before Nov. 3, Election Day.

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