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Leader in Kendall Whittier's Turnaround Will Guide Work to Create Destination Districts in Tulsa

A community leader credited with helping Kendall Whittier’s turnaround will try to do the same thing across Tulsa. Starting Feb. 1, Kendall Whittier Main Street Executive Director Sharrer will be the city’s Destination Districts program director. The program is looking at similar efforts by Oklahoma City to revitalize neglected areas of the city. "They’ve really seen their neighbor-traditional commercial districts really prosper and thrive. So, I think that this administration really wants to...

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Stitt Campaign

Trump Welcomes Stitt, Fellow Governors-Elect to White House

Oklahoma's newly elected Republican governor is visiting President Donald Trump at the White House, with a dozen other governors-elect from both parties. Trump tweeted a picture on Thursday of him meeting with Stitt and some of the other recently elected governors, including Florida Republican Ron DeSantis and Illinois Democrat J.B. Pritzker. Like Trump, Stitt leveraged his status as a businessman outsider during his race for governor. Stitt enjoyed Trump's endorsement once he secured the GOP...

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Michael Cohen On Trump In TV Interview: 'The Man Doesn't Tell The Truth'

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET Michael Cohen, President Trump's onetime lawyer and fixer, says his former boss knew it was wrong to order hush-money payments made during the 2016 presidential campaign to two women who allege they had affairs with Trump — but he directed Cohen to do it anyway to help his election chances. Cohen also said in an interview with ABC News aired Friday that the president's repeated assertions that Cohen is lying about the payments and other aspects of his work for Trump...

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StudioTulsa

Our guest is Tim Sharp, who has for several years now served as both Artistic Director and Conductor of the Tulsa Oratorio Chorus. He tells us about the newest TOC concert, "Russian Choral Classics," which will happen on Friday night (the 14th) at 7:30pm in Holy Family Cathedral (in downtown Tulsa). The evening will offer a cappella choral works -- both sacred and secular -- by Chesnokov, Grechaninov, Rachmaninov, and others. For more information, or to purchase tickets, please go here.

What happens when we as a society stop trusting our experts, stop consulting our longtime scholars, and stop listening to our intelligence-community professionals? What happens to our foreign policy? How are this nation's relationships with the rest of the world affected? How is our government itself altered? Our guest on ST is the conservative writer and scholar, Tom Nichols, who is also a Professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College.

Albert Bierstadt, Buffalo Hunt, 1860. Oil on canvas, Private Collection, image courtesy of Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Our guest is Laura Fry, the Senior Curator and Curator of Art at Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. She is also one of the curators of a striking new show at that museum, which she tells us about. Per the Gilcrease website: "Gilcrease Museum and the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming, have partnered to present the groundbreaking exhibition 'Albert Bierstadt: Witness to a Changing West.' Albert Bierstadt (1830–1902) is best known as one of America's premier western landscape artists.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Teresa Carr, a journalist who wrote the cover story for the January 2019 issue of Consumer Reports. As this in-depth article (titled "Medical Screening Tests You Do and Don't Need") notes near the outset: "Today, as we've learned more about how to detect disease early, there are scores of blood tests, ultrasounds, and CT scans to screen for conditions like cancer and low bone density.

Our guest on ST is the locally based photographer and writer, Rhys Martin, who joins us to discuss his new book: "Lost Restaurants of Tulsa." The book is just out, and it reveals the histories of dozens of restaurants from T-Town's past -- family sagas, culinary wonders, beloved diners, edge-of-town favorites, popular hang-outs, and more. It's a book that's sure to appeal to those who can lip-smackingly recall the likes of Pennington's, Shotgun Sam's, Villa Venice, The Golden Drumstick, The Razor Clam, St. Michael's Alley, The Louisiane, et al.

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Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

The U.S. Department of Education is sending emails to about 15,000 people around the country telling them: You've got money.

A food delivery man in India has been fired after a video that showed him eating a customer's order went viral.

The video shows a balding man dressed in a red T-shirt with a red delivery bag on his motorbike. The T-shirt reads "Zomato," a popular online food delivery company in India.

The man is parked at the side of a road. He uses a spoon to skim a few bites from a container of food he's opened, puts the lid back on, then picks another container and does the same thing. He puts the containers back in a plastic bag and reseals the bag with tape.

I can't imagine a harder act for a filmmaker to follow than Moonlight. That movie, a quietly shattering portrait of a young black man wrestling with his sexuality, held you rapt with its intimacy; it left you feeling as if you'd stared deep into that young man's soul.

A controversial statue of the Indian civil rights leader Mohandas Gandhi has been removed from the The University of Ghana campus, two years after it was installed and faculty promptly began protesting for its removal.

Arizona will soon have another new senator, with Republican Jon Kyl — who accepted a temporary appointment in the wake of GOP Sen. John McCain's death — stepping aside.

In a hotel conference room in Denizli, Turkey, about 60 Iranians sing along to songs praising Jesus mixed with Iranian pop music. When the music stops, American pastor Karl Vickery preaches with the help of a Persian translator.

"I'm not famous or rich. But I know Jesus. I have Jesus," he says, with a Southern drawl. The Farsi-speaking Christian converts shout "Hallelujah!" and clap.

Vickery, who's part of a visiting delegation from Beaumont, Texas, then offers to pray for each person in the room.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET

Michael Cohen, President Trump's onetime lawyer and fixer, says his former boss knew it was wrong to order hush-money payments made during the 2016 presidential campaign to two women who allege they had affairs with Trump — but he directed Cohen to do it anyway to help his election chances.

Cohen also said in an interview with ABC News aired Friday that the president's repeated assertions that Cohen is lying about the payments and other aspects of his work for Trump were false.

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