Top Stories

Monthlong Government Shutdown Affecting Program Helping 200 Formerly Homeless Tulsans

Local impacts of the 32-day government shutdown continue to pop up, with a program for chronically homeless Tulsans now feeling the pinch. Mental Health Association Oklahoma's supportive housing program is short $61,000. That's the amount of a monthly draw MHAOK receives from a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development grant. "There’s no one there at HUD because they’re not at work to sign off on it. So, we can’t draw the money, and so we have to figure out how to float that out of our...

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Ex-OU Students Apologize for Racist Video

NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — University of Oklahoma students demanded more from their campus administrators Tuesday, hours after the school released public apologies from two former students who were involved in a video in which one of the women wore blackface and used a racial slur. About 1,000 students and faculty members gathered at a campus rally Tuesday during which administrators condemned the video in which a white woman is seen with black paint on her face as another white woman laughs. But...

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A Tentative Deal In The LA Teachers Strike — Now, Union Members To Vote

Updated 5:45 ET Tuesday On the sixth day of the Los Angeles teachers strike, the school district and union leaders announced that they've reached a tentative agreement. "This is much more than just a narrow labor agreement. It's a very broad compact around things that get at social justice, educational justice and racial justice," United Teachers Los Angeles President Alex Caputo-Pearl said at a news conference Tuesday. "The strike no one wanted is now behind us," said Austin Beutner, the...

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The Savior

StudioTulsa

How did our nation's current opioid crisis come about? What steps were -- or were not -- taken as this epidemic was first being recognized? Who should ultimately be held accountable for this widespread tragedy? What policies enabled it, and who has benefitted most from those disastrous policies? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we feature a "live onstage" interview that host John Schummann recently recorded here in Tulsa with Chris McGreal, a senior writer at The Guardian and former journalist for BBC.

Our guest today on ST is Jeffrey Zeigler, the well-regarded cellist who is known for his work with Philip Glass, Yo-Yo Ma, John Zorn, Kronos Quartet, Laurie Anderson, and others. A supremely gifted "crossover" musician whose work draws upon classical, jazz, pop, rock, folk, and a variety of other sources, Zeigler will soon perform here in Tulsa. His concert, presented by Choregus Productions, happens at the Tulsa PAC's Doenges Theater on Friday the 25th.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Tamara Lebak, a Tulsa-based executive coach, organizational development consultant, and minister. She's also an accomplsihed singer-songwriter in the folk/roots/blues/alt-country manner, and she joins us to discuss her new album: "The Psalms Project: Volume 1." As Lebak has written of herself and her music online: "I'm a Universalist minister who believes that the Bible is ultimately about the relentless and persistent love of God.

We chat with Ian Shapiro, the Sterling Professor of Political Science and director of the MacMillan Center at Yale University. He's the co-author of a new book, "Responsible Parties: Saving Democracy from Itself," which he tells us about. The book engagingly explores why and how the form of government known as democracy has -- quite strangely and paradoxically -- reduced if not eradicated trust in political systems worldwide.

Our guest is Terrence Moore, a widely acclaimed photographer who's been shooting images along Route 66 for 40+ years. He tells us about his new book, "66 on 66," which gathers his finest images culled from the many hundreds he's made over the years of "the Mother Road." This book, with a corresponding text by local historian and author Michael Wallis, is just being published, and both Moore and Wallis will appear at a Magic City Books signing here in Tulsa on Friday the 18th. Details are posted here.

More StudioTulsa

Whether or not President Trump will deliver a traditional state of the union is in doubt because of the partial government shutdown. It's allowing Washington to reexamine a century-old tradition.

Tensions are rising in Venezuela ahead of nationwide protests called by the opposition-led National Assembly. A 35-year-old leader is heading the renewed effort to oust President Nicolás Maduro.

The Supreme Court has revived the Trump administration's ban on transgender military personnel, for now. NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with Shannon Minter of with the National Center for Lesbian Rights.

It's a meeting of two truly American pastimes: football and lawsuits.

First, the football.

Late in regulation in Sunday's NFC championship game, the New Orleans Saints were tied 20-20 with the Los Angeles Rams in pursuit of the Super Bowl.

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As the ball sailed toward Saints receiver Tommylee Lewis, Rams cornerback Nickell Robey-Coleman knocked into Lewis, appearing to make helmet-to-helmet contact. Officials called no pass interference or helmet-to-helmet penalties.

The Trump administration is planning to ask the Supreme Court to review a lower court's ruling that blocks the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census, according to a Justice Department filing released Tuesday.

Updated 6:00 p.m. ET

As the partial government shutdown hits a record 32nd day, the Senate is set to consider two competing proposals this week that could re-open the government — but probably won't.

When Jason Rezaian moved to Tehran to pursue journalism in 2009, he knew he was taking on a certain amount of risk.

"I think everybody who goes and works in a country like Iran makes those calculations and thinks about that," he says. "You don't have to read a lot of history to know that journalists have been targeted there in the past."

Still, Rezaian reasoned, if he was careful and "played very closely by the rules" — being transparent about the work he was doing and the people he was communicating with — he'd be safe.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 KPCC. To see more, visit KPCC.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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