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Fallin Won't Run Again

Gov. Mary Fallin says she will retire from politics when she steps down as governor in January and will not pursue elective office again. The Oklahoman reports that Fallin on Friday said she wants to spend more time with her family . The 63-year-old Republican has been in politics since she was 35, when she began serving as a state representative. Fallin later was elected the first female lieutenant governor, a position she held for 12 years. She then served in the U.S. House of...

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Another Police Shooting... This Time Near Cushing

The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation is reviewing a confrontation in north Oklahoma in which a sheriff's deputy shot a fleeing suspect during an exchange of gunfire. The bureau said in a statement that Payne County sheriff's deputies responded to a call of shots fired during a domestic disturbance early Saturday morning. An unnamed deputy later found James Clyde Jenkins driving and tried to pull him over, but Jenkins fled. Authorities say Jenkins eventually pulled over but then fired...

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As Insurers Offer Discounts For Fitness Trackers, Wearers Should Step With Caution

When Kathy Klute-Nelson heads out a on neighborhood walk she often takes her two dogs — Kona, a boxer, and Max, a small white dog of questionable pedigree who barrels out the front door with barks of enthusiasm. The 64-year-old resident of Costa Mesa, Calif., says she was never one to engage in regular exercise – especially after a long day of work. But about three years ago, her employer, the Auto Club of Southern California, made her and her colleagues an offer she couldn't refuse: Wear a...

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On the Next All This Jazz: New & Recent Trumpet Music

Listen for the next All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 17th, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. Every Saturday night, both online and over the air, ATJ delivers three hours of recent and classic jazz, across a wide range of styles, from 9 o'clock till midnight. From John Coltrane to John Zorn, Chris Connor to Kris Davis, Dave Brubeck to Dave Douglas, and Gerry Mulligan to Geri Allen, All This Jazz is delighted by modern (and post-modern!) jazz in its many forms, and we love...

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StudioTulsa

Steve Clem

The Sand Springs Cultural & Historical Museum is presenting the artwork of the late Louisiana Cajun painter George Rodrigue. Rodrigue is best known for his "blue dog" paintings which he created over the last two decades of his life, but through his career, he painted numerous images depicting the people and places of his south Louisiana home. 

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we get to know Ricco Wright, who owns and operates the nonprofit Black Wall Street Gallery, a recently created art space on Greenwood Avenue. After Wright graduated from Union High School, he studied mathematics as a Bill Gates Scholar at Langston University. Thereafter he earned a doctorate in math at Columbia University, after which he lived and worked in New York City for a decade. As Wright tells us, his own passion for the arts -- visual, musical, verbal, and otherwise -- flourished considerably while he was based in NYC.

News flash: Cats do not meow at random. Nor do they hiss because they have nothing better to do. Cat sounds do have a purpose -- and they can carry important messages. But what ARE those messages? Our guest on ST has some very interesting answers: Susanne Schötz, a professor at Lund University in Sweden, is part of a long-standing research program exploring how and why cats use vocal communication...with each other and with their human caretakers. Schötz has a new book out called "The Secret Language of Cats: How to Understand Your Cat for a Better, Happier Relationship."

(Note: This interview first aired late last year.) Our guest is Leslie Berlin, who is the Project Historian for the Silicon Valley Archives at Stanford University. Originally from Tulsa, Berlin has a book out that offers nothing less than the history of Silicon Valley. As was noted of this book by The New York Times: "[A] deeply researched and dramatic narrative of Silicon Valley's early years.... Meticulously told stories permit the reader to gain a nuanced understanding of the emergence of the broader technology ecosystem that has enabled Silicon Valley to thrive....

On this edition of our program, we're discussing a recent DHS-related proposal put forth by the Trump Administration as well as local efforts to challenge this proposal. The proposal in question would change the accepted ferderal definition of Public Charge, which is a term used by immigration officials to refer to certain legal immigrants who are able to receive government benefits like food assistance, housing assistance, and health care.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After meeting with North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore this past June, President Trump was effusive.

"Our conversation was open, honest, direct and very, very productive," he said. "We produced something that is beautiful."

But after five months of canceled meetings and muted statements of dissatisfaction by both countries, experts say there is no sign of progress toward the Singapore goal of so-called "denuclearization" of the North.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

President Trump's effort to limit the number of people seeking asylum in the United States will face legal challenges in two different federal courts on Monday.

When Kathy Klute-Nelson heads out a on neighborhood walk she often takes her two dogs — Kona, a boxer, and Max, a small white dog of questionable pedigree who barrels out the front door with barks of enthusiasm.

The 64-year-old resident of Costa Mesa, Calif., says she was never one to engage in regular exercise – especially after a long day of work. But about three years ago, her employer, the Auto Club of Southern California, made her and her colleagues an offer she couldn't refuse: Wear a Fitbit, walk every day and get up to $300 off her yearly health insurance premiums.

Election after election, pundits predict that Latinos will be a powerful voting bloc. And Latino voters consistently underperform those expectations by failing to turn out at the polls in big numbers.

But this year's midterm results in Nevada, Arizona and other states suggest that Latino turnout is up dramatically — a development that could reshape the electoral landscape for 2020 and beyond.

Copyright 2018 KCUR 89.3. To see more, visit KCUR 89.3.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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