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Tulsa up to 13th in Annual County Health Rankings

Tulsa County continues to climb in annual health rankings. Tulsa has improved from 27th in Oklahoma in 2011 to 13th in 2019 in the County Health Rankings from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. "Tulsa’s going in the wrong direction in terms of adult obesity: 30 percent adult obesity rate in Tulsa," said Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Communications Director Joe Marx. "Yet you’re doing well in areas like fewer people who are uninsured,...

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Oklahoma Office of Management and Enterprise Services Says It Needs $16M by April 1 for IT Program

Oklahoma’s state IT department asked lawmakers Tuesday for an additional $16 million by the end of the month. Lawmakers ordered information technology service consolidation through the Office of Management and Enterprise Services for dozens of state agencies in 2011. OMES now provides services to more than 110 state agencies. OMES officials said they’re behind on payments to various vendors and are more than 60 days late on $7 million in bills. Budget Director Brandy Manek said lawmakers last...

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Aspiring Doctors Seek Advanced Training In Addiction Medicine

The U.S. surgeon general's office estimates that more than 20 million people have a substance-use disorder. Meanwhile, the nation's drug overdose crisis shows no sign of slowing. Yet, by all accounts, there aren't nearly enough physicians who specialize in treating addiction — doctors with extensive clinical training who are board certified in addiction medicine. The opioid epidemic has made this doctor deficit painfully apparent. And it's spurring medical institutions across the United...

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Join Us for The Give & Take on Medicaid Expansion, The Oklahoma Plan, SB 605, and House Bill 1750

StudioTulsa

Photo by Bernie Guzik

Our guest is the locally based musician and photographer, Bernie Guzik. As a tuba player, the Ohio-born Guzik, who attended Julliard, has peformed with the New York Philharmonic, the American Symphony Orchestra, the Cleveland Orchestra, the Kansas City Philharmonic, the Tulsa Philharmonic, the Tulsa Symphony, and so forth. Now retired from music, he devotes more and more time to his other longtime passion: photography. Guzik tells us about this passion, which has led him to travel all over the world, documenting vanishing cultures with his camera.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Rubén Rengel, the 22-year-old Venezuelan violinist who won the 2018 Sphinx Competition, which is held annually for talented Black and Latino string players. Rengel will appear in Tulsa on Saturday night, the 16th, with the Signature Symphony at TCC. (More info and details on tickets are here.) On the program, Tchaikovsky's Concerto for Violin in D major, op. 35, which is a feature for Rengel, as well as Amy Beach's Symphony in E minor (a/k/a "the Gaelic").

Our guest is César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández, an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Denver. On Thursday the 14th, beginning at 6pm, he'll deliver the 19th Annual Buck Colbert Franklin Memorial Civil Rights Lecture on the TU campus. He'll speak on "Migrating to Prison: Immigration in the Age of Mass Incarceration," which is also the title of his forthcoming book. His academic interests center on "crimmigration law" -- meaning, the convergence of criminal law and immigration law. His previous book, "Crimmigration Law," was published by the American Bar Association in 2015.

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Our guest is John Brennan, the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency, where he served from 2013 to 2017. Previously a deputy national security advisor and assistant to President Barack Obama for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, Brennan today speaks to various audiences about how to both think of and respond to global events, terrorism, and cybersecurity concerns.

Faculty and fellows participating in the HEAL Initiative in Hinche, Haiti. (UC-San Francisco)

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, an interesting discussion of global health -- that is, thinking about the health and well-being of the world's populations in a global context, and moreover, about how to serve those populations by improving care (and achieving equity of care) for all people. It's about seeing health care as a basic human right, and thus as something that people all over the world are fully entitled to. Our guest is Dr. Phuoc Le of the University of California at San Francisco, who also teaches in the public health program at UC-Berkeley. Dr.

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With great power, comes great responsibility.

Or the chance to pull a practical joke.

Pranksters included some whimsical credits buried in the fine print of an annual White House economic report, making it seem that Peter Parker and Aunt May had joined the staff of the president's Council of Economic Advisers.

Over the weekend, Muslim mental health professionals quickly pulled together a webinar to share advice on how to deal with trauma after the New Zealand terrorist attacks on Friday. A white supremacist killed at least 50 people as they prayed in two mosques.

Psychiatrists and spiritual leaders doled out advice on self-care and how to help young Muslims work through this moment.

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

The White House says President Trump will nominate Stephen Dickson, a former executive and pilot at Delta Air Lines, to lead the Federal Aviation Administration.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

The terrorist attack in New Zealand that killed at least 50 people as they prayed in their mosques sent shockwaves throughout the world. But in the U.S., many young Muslims say they weren't surprised. They're a generation that has been raised in the midst of anti-Muslim rhetoric, wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, mass shootings and now rising hate crimes. As NPR's Leila Fadel reports, mental health experts are worried about the lasting impact on this generation.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

The terrorist attack in New Zealand that killed at least 50 people as they prayed in their mosques sent shockwaves throughout the world. But in the U.S., many young Muslims say they weren't surprised. They're a generation that has been raised in the midst of anti-Muslim rhetoric, wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, mass shootings and now rising hate crimes. As NPR's Leila Fadel reports, mental health experts are worried about the lasting impact on this generation.

Humanitarian aid groups are rescuing survivors of Cyclone Idai which swept through Mozambique and Malawi before hitting Zimbabwe. The storm rapidly inundated communities with torrential rain, creating inland oceans in Mozambique.

Sacha Myers of Save the Children, in Mozambique, told NPR, "The situation at the moment, in Mozambique ... is getting worse by the hour. The area is already inundated by floods that hit the area last month. The cyclone has come through. It has destroyed everything in its path." Myers says 100,000 people in Mozambique alone need urgent rescue.

On a drizzly day earlier this month, a gaggle of mostly Chinese protesters gathered outside a provincial Supreme Court in downtown Vancouver, British Columbia. Inside the court, an extradition hearing was underway to decide whether to send Meng Wanzhou, the chief financial officer of Chinese tech giant Huawei, to be prosecuted in the United States.

Updated at 3:57 p.m. ET

After years of criticism and multiple lawsuits alleging that Facebook engaged in discrimination by allowing advertisers to select which users could see their ads, the social media giant announced it will make changes to its ad platform by the end of the year.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

The terrorist attack in New Zealand that killed at least 50 people as they prayed in their mosques sent shockwaves throughout the world. But in the U.S., many young Muslims say they weren't surprised. They're a generation that has been raised in the midst of anti-Muslim rhetoric, wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, mass shootings and now rising hate crimes. As NPR's Leila Fadel reports, mental health experts are worried about the lasting impact on this generation.

Once, when Halle Butler was working as a temp, she was taken to a file room filled floor-to-ceiling with old documents and told that her job was to shred them.

"The whole thing had kind of a feeling of the beginning of the Rumpelstiltskin fairytale where she has to spin all the stuff into gold — except that I was creating garbage," Butler says.

Butler's novel The New Me explores what it's like to work in a dead-end office job. Her story focuses on a 30-year-old woman named Millie who wanders from temp job to temp job.

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