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Repair Work Gets Underway on Expressway Bridge Ramp

Repair work has started on the 50-year-old bridge over I-244. This after problems were found in a routine inspection. Around 100,000 vehicles per day travel on the roadway. The northbound US-169 off-ramp to westbound I-244 is narrowed to one lane until mid-December for bridge repairs. Delays can be expected, especially during peak travel times. All lanes of westbound I-244 will be closed between the I-44 junction (eastern split) and the US-169 junction till 6 a.m. Monday. Traffic will be...

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Tulsa District Attorney's Office

Prison Population Booms; Many from Tulsa County

A new report says Oklahoma prison admissions are rising despite efforts to slow the state's incarceration rate, which is the highest in the U.S. The Tulsa World reports that prison reform advocates Oklahomans for Criminal Justice Reform and FWD.us released the study Friday. The report says Department of Corrections admissions increased by 11 percent in the first year since State Question 780 took effect. Voters approved downgrading offenses including simple drug possession from felonies to...

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The Russia Investigations: Trump Says His Answers For Mueller Are Done. Now What?

This week in the Russia investigations: President Trump says he, and not his lawyers, completed written questions for the special counsel. Now, the ball is back in Robert Mueller's court. Paper jam President Trump says he has finished his open-book, take-home exam. It was no sweat, he said , but he also told reporters on Friday that he fully expects some of the questions were "tricked up" — written sneakily to lure him into what his attorneys have called a "perjury trap." That's the legal...

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On the Next All This Jazz: New & Recent Trumpet Music

Listen for the next All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 17th, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. Every Saturday night, both online and over the air, ATJ delivers three hours of recent and classic jazz, across a wide range of styles, from 9 o'clock till midnight. From John Coltrane to John Zorn, Chris Connor to Kris Davis, Dave Brubeck to Dave Douglas, and Gerry Mulligan to Geri Allen, All This Jazz is delighted by modern (and post-modern!) jazz in its many forms, and we love...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we get to know Ricco Wright, who owns and operates the nonprofit Black Wall Street Gallery, a recently created art space on Greenwood Avenue. After Wright graduated from Union High School, he studied mathematics as a Bill Gates Scholar at Langston University. Thereafter he earned a doctorate in math at Columbia University, after which he lived and worked in New York City for a decade. As Wright tells us, his own passion for the arts -- visual, musical, verbal, and otherwise -- flourished considerably while he was based in NYC.

News flash: Cats do not meow at random. Nor do they hiss because they have nothing better to do. Cat sounds do have a purpose -- and they can carry important messages. But what ARE those messages? Our guest on ST has some very interesting answers: Susanne Schötz, a professor at Lund University in Sweden, is part of a long-standing research program exploring how and why cats use vocal communication...with each other and with their human caretakers. Schötz has a new book out called "The Secret Language of Cats: How to Understand Your Cat for a Better, Happier Relationship."

(Note: This interview first aired late last year.) Our guest is Leslie Berlin, who is the Project Historian for the Silicon Valley Archives at Stanford University. Originally from Tulsa, Berlin has a book out that offers nothing less than the history of Silicon Valley. As was noted of this book by The New York Times: "[A] deeply researched and dramatic narrative of Silicon Valley's early years.... Meticulously told stories permit the reader to gain a nuanced understanding of the emergence of the broader technology ecosystem that has enabled Silicon Valley to thrive....

On this edition of our program, we're discussing a recent DHS-related proposal put forth by the Trump Administration as well as local efforts to challenge this proposal. The proposal in question would change the accepted ferderal definition of Public Charge, which is a term used by immigration officials to refer to certain legal immigrants who are able to receive government benefits like food assistance, housing assistance, and health care.

Photo by Erin Baiano

On the 100th anniversary of the end of "The War to End All Wars," the Tulsa Symphony will commemorate those lost in that war and all the wars that followed with a performance of Benjamin Britten's War Requiem. The work ingeniously combines the text of the Latin funeral mass with the war poetry of Wilfred Owen, a young British poet who served and died in the trenches of the First World War.

More StudioTulsa

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

The CIA has concluded that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the killing of outspoken Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, according to media reports.

Tulsa District Attorney's Office

A new report says Oklahoma prison admissions are rising despite efforts to slow the state's incarceration rate, which is the highest in the U.S.

The Tulsa World reports that prison reform advocates Oklahomans for Criminal Justice Reform and FWD.us released the study Friday.

The report says Department of Corrections admissions increased by 11 percent in the first year since State Question 780 took effect. Voters approved downgrading offenses including simple drug possession from felonies to misdemeanors.

For nearly a month, the two sisters — then ages 17 and 12 — traveled by road from their home in El Salvador to the southern border of the United States. They had no parent or relatives with them on that difficult journey in the fall of 2016 — just a group of strangers and their smugglers.

Ericka and her younger sister Angeles started out in multiple cars, Ericka remembers. "In Mexico, it was buses. And we changed buses very often." (NPR is using only the sisters' middle names to protect their identity as they await a decision on their application for asylum in the U.S.)

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Working in Bolivia's mines is a family business.

That's what Italian photographer Simone Francescangeli saw when he traveled to the city of Potosí of about 250,000 to document the daily lives of miners. They're part of a centuries-old enterprise to extract silver, tin, zinc and gold from the mountains. He was struck by the harsh and sometimes dangerous conditions the miners work in — and by the number of children he saw working in the mines. Some were teenagers. One youngster said he was 11 years old.

This week in the Russia investigations: President Trump says he, and not his lawyers, completed written questions for the special counsel. Now, the ball is back in Robert Mueller's court.

Paper jam

President Trump says he has finished his open-book, take-home exam.

It used to be you'd sign on the bottom line, whether it was a check, or a credit card receipt, or even a love letter. But the art of the signature has become less important and less practiced, and that has meant less certainty for elections officials in several states who are still counting votes from the Nov. 6 midterm elections.

Those officials are trying verify that the signatures required on mail-in, provisional, absentee and military ballots match the signature that voters have on file with the board of elections.

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