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Philbrook Museum of Art

Grant Will Help Tulsa Nudge Thousands of Legal Permanent Residents Toward Citizenship

Tulsa is getting $100,000 over the next two years to help eligible immigrants become U.S. citizens. Officials estimate there are around 10,000 legal permanent residents of the United States living in Tulsa County. They face many barriers to becoming U.S. citizens. "For some, it would be cost, just for the application or accessing legal services. For a lot of people, it’s really about just knowing who you can trust and who can provide services to you to get through the process," said YWCA...

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Bret Stewart

Memorial Service Set for 'Hee Haw' Host, Guitarist Roy Clark

BROKEN ARROW, Okla. (AP) — A public memorial service is planned in Oklahoma for singer-guitarist Roy Clark, who headlined the TV show "Hee Haw" for nearly a quarter century. A "celebration of life" service will be held Wednesday at Rhema Bible Church in the Tulsa suburb of Broken Arrow. Clark was 85 when he died last week at his home in Tulsa from complications of pneumonia. Clark was a guitar virtuoso known for hits including "Yesterday When I was Young" and "Honeymoon Feeling." He also...

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As Insurers Offer Discounts For Fitness Trackers, Wearers Should Step With Caution

When Kathy Klute-Nelson heads out on a neighborhood walk, she often takes her two dogs — Kona, a boxer, and Max, a small white dog of questionable pedigree who barrels out the front door with barks of enthusiasm. The 64-year-old resident of Costa Mesa, Calif., says she was never one to engage in regular exercise — especially after a long day of work. But about three years ago, her employer, the Auto Club of Southern California, made her and her colleagues an offer she couldn't refuse: Wear a...

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StudioTulsa

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Judy Melinek, a board-certified forensic pathologist practicing forensic medicine in California's Bay Area, where she is also the CEO of PathologyExpert, Inc. Lately, Dr.

Photo by Steve Clem

The Sand Springs Cultural & Historical Museum is presenting the artwork of the late Louisiana Cajun painter, George Rodrigue. Rodrigue is best known for his "blue dog" paintings, which he created over the last two decades of his life, but throughout his career, he painted numerous images depicting the people and places of his south Louisiana home. 

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we get to know Ricco Wright, who owns and operates the nonprofit Black Wall Street Gallery, a recently created art space on Greenwood Avenue. After Wright graduated from Union High School, he studied mathematics as a Bill Gates Scholar at Langston University. Thereafter he earned a doctorate in math at Columbia University, after which he lived and worked in New York City for a decade. As Wright tells us, his own passion for the arts -- visual, musical, verbal, and otherwise -- flourished considerably while he was based in NYC.

News flash: Cats do not meow at random. Nor do they hiss because they have nothing better to do. Cat sounds do have a purpose -- and they can carry important messages. But what ARE those messages? Our guest on ST has some very interesting answers: Susanne Schötz, a professor at Lund University in Sweden, is part of a long-standing research program exploring how and why cats use vocal communication...with each other and with their human caretakers. Schötz has a new book out called "The Secret Language of Cats: How to Understand Your Cat for a Better, Happier Relationship."

(Note: This interview first aired late last year.) Our guest is Leslie Berlin, who is the Project Historian for the Silicon Valley Archives at Stanford University. Originally from Tulsa, Berlin has a book out that offers nothing less than the history of Silicon Valley. As was noted of this book by The New York Times: "[A] deeply researched and dramatic narrative of Silicon Valley's early years.... Meticulously told stories permit the reader to gain a nuanced understanding of the emergence of the broader technology ecosystem that has enabled Silicon Valley to thrive....

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Throughout last year, Ivanka Trump sent hundreds of emails to government officials using a personal email account. That's according to The Washington Post. Carol Leonnig is one of the reporters who broke the story and joins us now. Welcome.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Throughout last year, Ivanka Trump sent hundreds of emails to government officials using a personal email account. That's according to The Washington Post. Carol Leonnig is one of the reporters who broke the story and joins us now. Welcome.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Updated at 9:07 p.m. ET

The Chicago Police Department says a police officer has died after he was shot at Mercy Hospital & Medical Center on Chicago's Near South Side, one of four killed in a domestic-related shooting.

Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi identified the officer as Samuel Jimenez; the identities of the others killed in the shooting have not been released officially.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Throughout last year, Ivanka Trump sent hundreds of emails to government officials using a personal email account. That's according to The Washington Post. Carol Leonnig is one of the reporters who broke the story and joins us now. Welcome.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Updated at 5:27 p.m. ET

The Democrats organizing an effort to block Nancy Pelosi from retaking the House speaker's gavel have finally gone public.

Eleven House Democrats and five incoming freshmen have signed a letter promising to vote against Pelosi in Democrats' internal caucus leadership vote as well as on the House floor in January.

The message for the migrant caravan was clear from marchers on Sunday in Tijuana, Mexico: We don't want you here.

"We want the caravan to go; they are invading us," said Patricia Reyes, a 62-year-old protester, hiding from the sun under an umbrella. "They should have come into Mexico correctly, legally, but they came in like animals."

A few hundred Tijuanenses gathered in the city's high-end Rio area to protest the groups migrating from Central American countries.

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