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Oklahoma Senate

Hoskin Lauds 'Powerful' Friendships With Lawmakers on Cherokee Nation Capitol Visit

Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. addressed both chambers of the Oklahoma legislature Wednesday as Cherokee Nation officials visited the capitol. Cherokee Nation officials have made an annual visit to the capitol for years, but this one comes in the midst of the dispute over gaming compacts with Gov. Kevin Stitt. Hoskin did not mention the gaming compacts in his addresses to the Senate and House, but he did thank lawmakers for their friendship and respect. "We’re forging friendships on which...

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Tulsa Office of Film, Music Arts and Culture

Tulsa to Have Expanded Presence at South by Southwest

Tulsa will have a bigger footprint this year at the annual conference and festival South by Southwest. The Austin, Texas, event is best known for its celebration of the technology, film, and music industries. Tulsa Regional Tourism President Ray Hoyt said getting Tulsa’s name out into the world is the goal. "It’s all about engagement and making sure that we’re part of that story, because if we’re not there, the story’s not being told. So, it’s really about us telling Tulsa’s story as a sense...

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PUBLIC RADIO TULSA IS HIRING!

NEWS ANCHOR/REPORTER FOR KWGS

Trump Administration Pressed On Coronavirus Preparedness

President Trump will hold a news conference Wednesday afternoon about the rapidly spreading coronavirus, as fears have sent the stock market into a spiral and Republican and Democratic leaders have questioned the administration's response. Trump announced the event in a tweet and said it was a retort to media outlets such as CNN and MSNBC trying to "make the Caronavirus look as bad as possible." On Capitol Hill, lawmakers have voiced dissatisfaction with the administration's response. "The...

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Year of the Woman

StudioTulsa

Our guest is Dr. Christopher Kerr, the CEO and chief medical officer at Hospice Buffalo. He joins us to discuss his important new book, which might be the first-ever volume to both document and study the meaningful dreams and visions that people seem to universally experience as death approaches. As was noted of this book is a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Penetrating and empathetic.... This comforting guide will reassure the dying and their loved ones while providing instructive portraits of end-of-life patients for those who work in medical and healing professions."

Our guest is Eitan Hersh, an associate professor of political science at Tufts University. His new book, which he tells us about, is focused on how any American citizen can -- in these pivotal, ever-so-political times -- "make real change" is her or her own community. As was noted by a critic at BookPage: "Reform-minded readers who want to do more than cast a vote will find essential information in [this work].... Hersh brings unique expertise to this important book.... A fascinating mix of history, statistics, social science, storytelling, and personal insight.

Our guest on ST is Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner, one of America's leading experts on women's history, who is on the faculty at Syracuse University (among other schools) and has been teaching college-level women's studies courses for more than 45 years. She'll be speaking tomorrow, Friday the 21st, at 7pm in the Helmerich Center for American Research (on the campus of Gilcrease Museum). Dr. Wagner's talk, titled "Forgotten Champions of Women's Liberty," is free and open to the public. More info is posted here.

With the 2020 presidential race now well underway, the League of Women Voters of Metropolitan Tulsa is seeking out women in northeastern Oklahoma who could be president. The League will honor 10 such women from our community -- all of them dedicated to leadership and community service, with nominations presently being taken -- at its upcoming Madam President event (happening on May 5; more info at this link).

Our guest on StudioTulsa, Erica Etelson, is a writer, community activist, and certified Powerful Non-Defensive Communication facilitator. A former human rights attorney, she is also the author of a new book, "Beyond Contempt: How Liberals Can Communicate Across the Great Divide." This book aims to show left-leaning U.S. citizens of all sorts how to communicate respectfully, passionately, and effectively across the current political divide without understating or downplaying one's beliefs and ideas.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is telling Americans that they should be prepared for the possibility of a COVID-19 outbreak in their community.

But what does preparedness look like in practice? The short answer: Don't panic — but do prepare.

Updated 6:47 p.m. ET

Police are on the scene at the Molson Coors Beverage Company in Milwaukee after officials say a gunman opened fire on the campus Wednesday afternoon. Local officials say there are multiple fatalities but did not give a definitive figure.

"This remains an active scene," Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett said at a late afternoon news conference. "There are multiple fatalities. We know that. The police department, the fire department have been working extensively. The sheriff is here as well."

Updated at 6:52 p.m. ET

The U.S. health care system is trying to be ready for possible outbreaks, after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned communities this week to prepare for the kind of spread now being seen in Iran, Italy, South Korea and other areas outside the virus's epicenter in China.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

Hours after the White House rejected the idea of appointing a coronavirus czar, President Trump on Wednesday put Vice President Pence in charge of the administration's coronavirus response.

"We're doing really well, and Mike is going to be in charge," Trump said, noting that Pence's experience as governor of Indiana made him adept at working with state and local health authorities.

"This is not a czar," he said.

As fears spread of a wider coronavirus outbreak in the U.S., experts in global health pandemics as well as some of President Trump's leading political adversaries contend that the federal government's response may be lacking a key figure: a coronavirus czar.

Kim Thomas felt drawn to being a home health aide after caring for her own ailing mother. Human dignity, she says, can be simple, like a bath and a favorite snack.

When Thomas first started visiting homes to care for patients, she made $7 an hour. That was in North Carolina about 16 years ago. Her pay inched up over time, to $10.50. To try to make ends meet, she sometimes would work through the night, dozing in patients' homes.

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Syrian and Russian armed forces are advancing quickly on rebel areas, killing civilians and intensifying suffering as nearly 1 million refugees huddle in camps near Turkey. Little relief is in sight.

The House of Representatives overwhelmingly voted to classify lynching as a federal hate crime. The vote came at the end of Black History Month.

David Roback, a guitarist and songwriter best known for working alongside singer Hope Sandoval in the group Mazzy Star, has died. The news was confirmed to NPR in a press release from Roback's management sent on Tuesday evening. He was 61.

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