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Ditch Witch West

Toro to Buy Oklahoma-Based Ditch Witch Maker

Bloomington, Minnesota-based The Toro Company has announced plans to purchase the Oklahoma-based company that manufactures Ditch Witch and other underground construction equipment. Toro said in a news release Friday that it will pay $700 million in cash for The Charles Machine Works, a privately held company based in Perry, Oklahoma. The proposed sale is subject to regulatory approval and is expected to close by the end of the third quarter. Toro chairman and CEO Richard Olson said Charles...

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State Impact

Judge Keeps Most Keystone XL Pipeline Work on Hold

A federal judge in Montana has largely kept in place an injunction that blocks a Canadian company from performing preliminary work on the stalled Keystone XL oil pipeline. U.S. District Judge Brian Morris on Friday denied a request by Calgary-based TransCanada to begin constructing worker camps for the 1,184-mile pipeline that would ship crude from Alberta to the Gulf Coast. However, Morris said TransCanada could perform some limited activities outside the pipeline's right-of-way. Those...

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As Trump Declares National Emergency To Fund Border Wall, Democrats Promise A Fight

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET Calling it "a great thing to do," President Trump declared a national emergency on Friday in order to help finance a long-promised wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. It's a highly unusual move from an unconventional president. In circuitous remarks in the Rose Garden, Trump said he was declaring an emergency because of "an invasion of our country with drugs, with human traffickers, with all types of criminals and gangs." The move came a day after Congress approved a...

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Swing on This LIVE Song Request

Radio in Tulsa is rich in history. The legendary Bob Wills broadcasted his show and live dances with the Texas Playboys from Cain’s Ballroom every Thursday and Saturday evening over KVOO. The program reached homes across America and soldiers, and fans would write in their song requests and tune in faithfully to listen. Tulsan Brett Bingham and manager for the new Bob Wills’ Texas Playboys Under the Direction of Jason Roberts , has preserved the original song sheets as part of his personal...

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Glenstone: A Labor of Love

On the Next All This Jazz, Live Tracks by Art Blakey, Carmen McRae, Henry Threadgill, and More

Join us for All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 16th, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. It'll be three solid hours of can't-miss modern jazz -- all of it chosen and presented by an actual person...rather than a robot! Also, in the third and thematic hour of our show, from 11pm till midnight, our focus will be Live Recordings . Thus we'll hear in-live-performance tracks from Art Blakey (shown here amid certain stellar cohorts), George Wallington, Carmen McRae, Henry...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we chat with artist Joel Daniel Phillips, who is currently a Tulsa Artist Fellow. A California native, he tells us about his new show, "It Felt Like the Future Was Now," which is on view at Philbrook Downtown through May 19th. Per the Philbrook Downtown website: "Phillips chooses images charged with history. The labor, both physical and emotional, needed to create his graphite drawings is part of what draws the viewer into the work.

On this installment of ST, a discussion of the history of race relations in America -- and of a landmark Supreme Court decision that profoundly shaped this history. Steve Luxenberg is our guest; he is a longtime senior editor at The Washington Post, and his new book is "Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation." As Louis Menand of The New Yorker Magazine has noted: "Luxenberg has chosen a fresh way to tell the story of Plessy.... 'Separate' is deeply researched, and it wears its learning lightly. It's a storytelling kind of book....

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're discussing court fees, court fines, collection costs, and other court-related expenses, which, all told, make up somewhere between 80 and 90 percent of the budget for the State of Oklahoma's court system. Therefore, and quite regrettably, our state's jails are by now brimming with people whose only "crime" is being unable to pay such costs.

Where does Northeastern Oklahoma now stand, when it comes to HIV/AIDS care? On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about Tulsa Cares, a local nonprofit that, per its website, is "committed to creating a community where all people with HIV/AIDS have equal opportunities for healthy living. We advance our mission through empowerment, inclusion, and the creation of hope by offering tailored, integrated resources and advocating for the end of HIV stigma." One of our guests is Kate Neary, the Chief Executive Officer at Tulsa Cares.

Our guest is Catherine Whitney, the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at Philbrook Musuem of Art here in Tulsa. She tells us about a just-opened, far-reaching exhibit at Philbrook, curated by herself, called "Making Modern America." Featuring 60+ paintings, photographs, design objects, and prints -- and on view through May 26th -- this show explores how U.S. artists working from 1910 to 1960 depicted the dramatic social and environmental changes of this pivotal era.

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The U.S.-led liberal world order is falling apart, according to the organizers of a gathering of world leaders and defense chiefs in Germany that has met annually since the Cold War.

The Munich Security Conference report said the Trump administration displays an "irritating enthusiasm for strongmen across the globe" and "disdain for international institutions and agreements."

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Updated at 10:14 a.m. ET

The Vatican has defrocked former cardinal Theodore McCarrick, it said Saturday, making him the highest-ranking church official to date to be expelled from the priesthood for sex abuse.

The U.S. effort to distribute tons of food and medicine to needy Venezuelans is more than just a humanitarian mission. The operation is also designed to foment regime change in Venezuela — which is why much of the international aid community wants nothing to do with it.

Humanitarian operations are supposed to be neutral. That's why the International Committee of the Red Cross, United Nations agencies and other relief organizations have refused to collaborate with the U.S. and its allies in the Venezuelan opposition who are trying to force President Nicolás Maduro from power.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Most American automobiles are powered by internal combustion engines: Gas or diesel goes in, tiny explosions power pistons and turn a crankshaft, the car moves forward and carbon dioxide goes out.

But a growing chorus environmental activists, business analysts and auto executives are predicting a sea change, as battery-powered electric vehicles grow in popularity.

Before President Trump even uttered the words "national emergency" on Friday, there was already a lot of talk about legal challenges.

Here's the central question: Is it constitutional for the president to ignore Congress' decision not to give him all the money he wants for a Southern border wall — and, instead, get it through a declaration of a national emergency?

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

An end to the Denver teacher strike

Denver teachers returned to the classroom this week after the Denver Classroom Teachers Association and Denver Public Schools reached a tentative labor agreement Thursday morning. Teachers in Denver had been on strike since Monday.

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