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Repair Work Gets Underway on Expressway Bridge Ramp

Repair work has started on the 50-year-old bridge over I-244. This after problems were found in a routine inspection. Around 100,000 vehicles per day travel on the roadway. The northbound US-169 off-ramp to westbound I-244 is narrowed to one lane until mid-December for bridge repairs. Delays can be expected, especially during peak travel times. All lanes of westbound I-244 will be closed between the I-44 junction (eastern split) and the US-169 junction till 6 a.m. Monday. Traffic will be...

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Tulsa District Attorney's Office

Prison Population Booms; Many from Tulsa County

A new report says Oklahoma prison admissions are rising despite efforts to slow the state's incarceration rate, which is the highest in the U.S. The Tulsa World reports that prison reform advocates Oklahomans for Criminal Justice Reform and FWD.us released the study Friday. The report says Department of Corrections admissions increased by 11 percent in the first year since State Question 780 took effect. Voters approved downgrading offenses including simple drug possession from felonies to...

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The Russia Investigations: Trump Says His Answers For Mueller Are Done. Now What?

This week in the Russia investigations: President Trump says he, and not his lawyers, completed written questions for the special counsel. Now, the ball is back in Robert Mueller's court. Paper jam President Trump says he has finished his open-book, take-home exam. It was no sweat, he said , but he also told reporters on Friday that he fully expects some of the questions were "tricked up" — written sneakily to lure him into what his attorneys have called a "perjury trap." That's the legal...

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On the Next All This Jazz: New & Recent Trumpet Music

Listen for the next All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 17th, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. Every Saturday night, both online and over the air, ATJ delivers three hours of recent and classic jazz, across a wide range of styles, from 9 o'clock till midnight. From John Coltrane to John Zorn, Chris Connor to Kris Davis, Dave Brubeck to Dave Douglas, and Gerry Mulligan to Geri Allen, All This Jazz is delighted by modern (and post-modern!) jazz in its many forms, and we love...

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StudioTulsa

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we get to know Ricco Wright, who owns and operates the nonprofit Black Wall Street Gallery, a recently created art space on Greenwood Avenue. After Wright graduated from Union High School, he studied mathematics as a Bill Gates Scholar at Langston University. Thereafter he earned a doctorate in math at Columbia University, after which he lived and worked in New York City for a decade. As Wright tells us, his own passion for the arts -- visual, musical, verbal, and otherwise -- flourished considerably while he was based in NYC.

News flash: Cats do not meow at random. Nor do they hiss because they have nothing better to do. Cat sounds do have a purpose -- and they can carry important messages. But what ARE those messages? Our guest on ST has some very interesting answers: Susanne Schötz, a professor at Lund University in Sweden, is part of a long-standing research program exploring how and why cats use vocal communication...with each other and with their human caretakers. Schötz has a new book out called "The Secret Language of Cats: How to Understand Your Cat for a Better, Happier Relationship."

(Note: This interview first aired late last year.) Our guest is Leslie Berlin, who is the Project Historian for the Silicon Valley Archives at Stanford University. Originally from Tulsa, Berlin has a book out that offers nothing less than the history of Silicon Valley. As was noted of this book by The New York Times: "[A] deeply researched and dramatic narrative of Silicon Valley's early years.... Meticulously told stories permit the reader to gain a nuanced understanding of the emergence of the broader technology ecosystem that has enabled Silicon Valley to thrive....

On this edition of our program, we're discussing a recent DHS-related proposal put forth by the Trump Administration as well as local efforts to challenge this proposal. The proposal in question would change the accepted ferderal definition of Public Charge, which is a term used by immigration officials to refer to certain legal immigrants who are able to receive government benefits like food assistance, housing assistance, and health care.

Photo by Erin Baiano

On the 100th anniversary of the end of "The War to End All Wars," the Tulsa Symphony will commemorate those lost in that war and all the wars that followed with a performance of Benjamin Britten's War Requiem. The work ingeniously combines the text of the Latin funeral mass with the war poetry of Wilfred Owen, a young British poet who served and died in the trenches of the First World War.

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One minute, Seamus Hughes was reading the book Dragons Love Tacos to his son. A few minutes later, after putting him to bed, Hughes was back on his computer, stumbling on what could be one of the most closely guarded secrets within the U.S. government: that the Justice Department may be preparing criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

President Trump visited fire-ravaged areas of California on Saturday, meeting with people affected by the wildfires. At least 71 people were killed in the Camp Fire in Northern California, and more than 1,000 people have been reported missing, making it the most destructive and deadly wildfire in California state history.

Andrew Gillum ended his bid to become the first African-American governor of Florida on Saturday, conceding the race to his Republican rival, former Rep. Ron DeSantis.

"R.J. and I wanted to take a moment to congratulate Mr. DeSantis on becoming the next governor of the great state of Florida," Gillum said in a Facebook video with his wife at his side. "This has been the journey of our lives."

President Trump shot down reports on Saturday that his administration was considering extraditing a Pennsylvania-based foe of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in order to diffuse tensions between Turkey and Saudi Arabia.

Erdogan says Fethullah Gulen, a Turkish cleric who has been living in Pennsylvania since the late 1990s, was involved in a failed coup in 2016. The government has requested the U.S. send him back to Turkey.

Missing Argentine Submarine Found In Deep Ocean Ravine

2 hours ago

An Argentine submarine has been found about a half-mile below the ocean's surface, almost a year after it disappeared with 44 crew members on board.

Ocean Infinity, a Houston-based company, sent minisubmarines to scour the ocean floor for the submarine and were on the last day of their search when they received notification of a 197-foot-long geological formation in a deep ocean ravine, about 700 miles east of the Argentine city of Puerto Madryn. Photo images revealed it to be the submarine, the ARA San Juan.

This week was one of the most chaotic in British politics in recent decades. After more than a year of negotiations, Prime Minister Theresa May presented a Brexit withdrawal agreement from the European Union that seemed to unite British politicians across the spectrum in their hatred for it.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Updated at 2:45 p.m. ET

The CIA has concluded that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the killing of outspoken Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, according to media reports.

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