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Oklahoma Department of Corrections

Judge rules death is not 'irreparable harm'; request for execution stay advances to 10th Circuit

A federal judge declined to block the execution of John Marion Grant set for Thursday. A hearing for an injunction took place on Monday at the federal courthouse in Oklahoma City. Judge Stephen Friot ruled that Grant’s execution can go forward despite his status as a plaintiff in a lawsuit challenging Oklahoma’s lethal injection protocol. Public defender Dale Baich said it came down to Grant and others declining to pick a different method of execution as Friot previously ordered. “Because...

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Jennifer Martin

Marijuana industry reps try to sell state lawmakers on process to help reduce testing costs

Cannabis industry representatives told Oklahoma lawmakers during an interim study Monday that adopting standard practices used by food and drug makers could make medical marijuana cheaper and safer. They tried to sell lawmakers on process validation, a system where data is collected at different stages of manufacturing to ensure safety. Apothecary Farms and Apothecary Extracts Director of Compliance and Regulatory Affairs Kevin Gallagher explained how it might work for growers, who currently...

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The Facebook Papers: What you need to know about the trove of insider documents

Facebook's rank-and-file employees warned their leaders about the company's effects on society and politics in the U.S. — and its inability to effectively moderate content in other countries magnified those dangers. Those are two of the main takeaways from thousands of internal Facebook documents that NPR and other news outlets have reviewed. The documents, known collectively as the Facebook Papers, were shared in redacted form with Congress after whistleblower Frances Haugen, a former...

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StudioTulsa

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Robert J. Davis -- a/k/a The Healthy Skeptic -- whose writing has appeared on CNN, PBS, WebMD, and in The Wall Street Journal. He is also the author of several books on healthy eating and healthy living, and he's well-known for the ways in which he dissects the science/data/research behind popular health claims.

Photo by Juergen Frank (via brentanoquartet.com)

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Bruce Sorrell, who joined Chamber Music Tulsa as its executive director in early 2012. He tells us about the exciting performances that CMT will present this weekend (on Friday the 22nd, Saturday the 23rd, and Sunday the 24th) by the Brentano Quartet. Long regarded as one of the nation's leading string quartets and now based at the Yale School of Music, the Brentano is celebrating its 30th season as a collective.

Map via npr.org

Our guest is Ambassador William B. Taylor, who is Vice President of Strategic Stability and Security at the U.S. Institute of Peace. From June 2019 to January 2020, he served as chargé d’affaires and acting ambassador at the U.S. embassy in Kyiv. He also served as the U.S. ambassador to Ukraine from 2006 to 2009. A longtime expert on, and participant in, the U.S.

On this edition of ST, we learn about Arab Film Fest Tulsa, which opens tomorrow (10/21) at Circle Cinema here in Tulsa and runs through Sunday (10/24). A joint presentation of Tulsa Artist Fellowship, Circle Cinema, and Mizna, an Arab American arts/cultural organization based in Minnesota, this festival will offer several feature-length movies (as well as a few shorts) of Southwest Asian or North African (as in, "SWANA") origin.

(Note: This interview first aired back in June.) When the documentary film "Period. End of Sentence." won an Oscar in 2019, the film's co-producer, Melissa Berton, said in her acceptance speech: "A period should end a sentence, not a girl's education." Now comes a book that follows-up on that goundbreaking movie, a far-reaching work that outlines the challenges confronting those who menstruate worldwide and the solutions being offered by a new generation of body-positive activists and innovators. Our guest is the author of this work, Anita Diamant.

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Image via KQED.org (Photo by Gary Sexton)

Museum Confidential (S6E4): Judy Chicago

On the occasion of her first-ever career retrospective, we speak with the legendary artist and feminist, Judy Chicago (born 1939). "Judy Chicago: A Retrospective," now on view at San Francisco's de Young Museum, includes about 130 paintings, prints, drawings, and ceramic sculptures, in addition to ephemera, several films, and a documentary. We also talk about Chicago's smoke sculptures. What is a smoke sculpture? We'll get to that.

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For two years, Sudan had looked to be on the path to democracy — leaving behind decades of violent military dictatorship to become a pocket of stability in the turbulent but strategically important Horn of Africa region.

But Monday's military coup d'etat has turned that on its head, taking U.S. officials by surprise and sparking fear that a failure of democratic transition there could encourage coups elsewhere and lead to a loss of U.S. influence in the region.

Oklahoma Department of Corrections

A federal judge declined to block the execution of John Marion Grant set for Thursday.

 

A hearing for an injunction took place on Monday at the federal courthouse in Oklahoma City. Judge Stephen Friot ruled that Grant’s execution can go forward despite his status as a plaintiff in a lawsuit challenging Oklahoma’s lethal injection protocol.

 

The U.S. has given 200 million COVID-19 vaccine doses to countries in need and has said it will give a total of 1.1 billion by 2022. Yet public health specialists say several more billion doses are needed around the world. Steve Inskeep of NPR's Morning Edition interviewed Gayle Smith, coordinator for global COVID response and health security at the U.S. State Department, to learn more about global vaccine distribution.

Two men who needed help up a steep rock in British Columbia were saved thanks to a group of Sikh men who unraveled and removed their turbans to create a makeshift rope. The steep rocks led to rough, raging waters near a waterfall.

First came the tourists. Next comes the business. Blue Origin says it will create a new privately owned space station in orbit around the Earth — what it calls a "mixed-use business park" in space.

The company announced the plan months after completing its first human space flight on the New Shepard launch vehicle, an endeavor that included taking a paying customer into space.

Facebook's rank-and-file employees warned their leaders about the company's effects on society and politics in the U.S. — and its inability to effectively moderate content in other countries magnified those dangers. Those are two of the main takeaways from thousands of internal Facebook documents that NPR and other news outlets have reviewed.

The documents, known collectively as the Facebook Papers, were shared in redacted form with Congress after whistleblower Frances Haugen, a former Facebook product manager, disclosed them to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

In a new book, Barack Obama and Bruce Springsteen envision a more unified America

7 hours ago

Barack and Bruce. Obama and Springsteen. The Boss and Mr. President. Or maybe you can just call them renegades.

Launched in February, the Renegades podcast consisted of a series of candid conversations between iconic musician Bruce Springsteen and former President Barack Obama, recorded in the summer of 2020 during the height of the pandemic.

Where We Come From: What's in a name?

7 hours ago

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Biden issues new rules for international travelers

7 hours ago

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