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Chris Polansky / KWGS News

'This Is Necessary:' Bynum Announces Mask Requirement

Mayor G.T. Bynum announced on Friday that, on the advice of Dr. Bruce Dart, director of the Tulsa Health Department, an ordinance will be introduced requiring face coverings in the city of Tulsa. "This is necessary to slow the current rate of viral spread that will endanger our health care system’s ability to treat those in need if it is not addressed," Bynum said in the statement. At a Wednesday press conference, Bynum said he would only recommend the implementation of such a mandate if Dart...

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Muscogee (Creek) Nation

Tribes, State, Officials React To Historic SCOTUS Ruling On McGirt V. Oklahoma

In a stunning 5-4 vote , the United States Supreme Court on Thursday sided with Oklahoma tribes in McGirt v. Oklahoma , saying much of the eastern half of Oklahoma is still an Indian reservation.

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Federal Executions Set To Resume After 17 Years With 3 Deaths Scheduled Soon

Capital punishment is on the decline in the United States, with only 13 new death sentences and seven executions so far this year. But the U.S. Justice Department is moving in the other direction. Authorities are preparing the death chamber in Terre Haute, Ind., for the first federal executions in 17 years, starting Monday. Death row inmates, their spiritual advisers and even one set of victims' relatives are moving to the courts to try to stop or delay the process. They're using a novel...

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On the Next All This Jazz: A Gathering of Excellent “Live at Newport” Recordings

Catch the forthcoming edition of All This Jazz, beginning at 9pm on Saturday the 11th, right here on Public Radio 89.5 KWGS-FM (and streaming at PublicRadioTulsa.org ). Our wide-ranging music program delivers three hours of recent, classic, modern, and post-modern jazz, each and every Saturday night, from 9 o’clock till midnight. On our next broadcast, we’ll hear from Lester Bowie, Michael Brecker, Matthew Shipp, Pat Martino, Gerald Wilson, and Kate McGarry, among other greats. And in the...

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StudioTulsa

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Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a surprising 5-4 decision in the case of McGirt v. Oklahoma; the Court ruled that much of the eastern half of Oklahoma is still an Indian reservation. In doing so, the Court affirmed that -- because Congress had not expressly disestablished the Muskogee Creek Reservation, which was created well over a century ago -- that Reservation still exists when it comes to the Federal Major Crimes Act.

(Note: This interview first aired back in December.) Our guest is Phil Keith, the co-author of a remarkable biography titled "All Blood Runs Red: The Legendary Life of Eugene Bullard -- Boxer, Pilot, Soldier, Spy." As was noted of this compelling work in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "This dazzling biography, drawing on the subject's unpublished memoir, explores the incredible life and times of the first African-American fighter pilot: Eugene 'Gene' Bullard.

Our guest is Terri White, who left her post as the Commissioner of Oklahoma's Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services earlier this year. A well-respected expert on, and advocate for, all matters of mental health, White had been appointed Commissioner in 2007; she originally joined the Department in 2001. White joins us to discuss her new post, which will be serving as the CEO of the vital statewide nonprofit, Mental Health Association Oklahoma, which is based in Tulsa. She'll replace Mike Brose, who led MHAOK for some 27 years.

We welcome to our show Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, a physician, epidemiologist, public health expert, and progressive activist. He was appointed health director of Detroit, Michigan, at age 30, and he was formerly a professor at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. Dr. El-Sayed's new book, which he tells us about, is "Healing Politics: A Doctor's Journey into the Heart of Our Political Epidemic." As was noted of this book by Bill McKibben with 350.org: "This is a very important book.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Jennifer Clark, a Visiting Associate Professor of Community Health at TU's Oxley College of Health Sciences; she teaches in TU's Health Care Delivery Science Program. Dr. Clark is also a contributor/commentator for the ongoing, thrice-weekly Project ECHO updates regarding COVID-19. These online, open-to-the-public updates, originating from Oklahoma State University and freely streamable, are medically-driven information sessions presented by a multi-institutional array of doctors and scientists.

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Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Democrats have had no shortage of descriptors for President Trump's decision to commute Roger Stone's prison sentence.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Ants do it. Lobsters do it. Even equatorial mandrills do it. Why don't many Americans do it: Wear masks and keep a wise social distance from each other?

Scientific American reports this week how several animals seem to know how to take precautions and keep their distance so they're less likely to be infected by a peer.

As Zuleika Yusuf Daffala walks across Kibera, one of the big informal settlements in Kenya's capital, she greets dozens of kids on the streets. Some are jumping rope, others chasing each other through the alley and another group is trying to make a tiny cooking pan out of an aluminum can.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

As the pandemic continues, children are still mostly at home. Summer activities are canceled or up in the air, and many children are suffering confusion and stress. Parents may be stressed themselves, but there are ways to help kids feel better.

During the first few weeks of staying at home, Maryam Jernigan-Noesi's 4-year-old son Carter was excited. His working parents were around him most of the day, and it seemed like a big extended weekend. But after a few weeks, she says, things changed.

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