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National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

COVID-19 Update: Spread Up Slightly, Statewide Hospitalizations Steady

The Oklahoma State Department of Health reported 444,288 total cases of COVID-19 in the state on Wednesday, an increase of 2,382 over the past week. The state has seen roughly the same number of new infections each of the past three weeks. Tulsa County data is now being updated on a weekly basis, with numbers reflecting the previous Sunday through Saturday. At last count, Tulsa County had 73,345 cases, up 333 over the past week. Tulsa County's total is second to Oklahoma County's 85,218. The...

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Oklahoma County Sheriff's Office

Woman Is Sixth Detainee To Die In Oklahoma County Jail So Far This Calendar Year

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A 65-year-old woman has died in the Oklahoma County jail, making her the sixth inmate to die at the lockup this year, a jail official said Wednesday. The woman, whose name was not released, suffered undisclosed health issues and was under suicide watch when jail staff saw her arm go limp Tuesday night and called medical personnel, who pronounced her dead, according to jail spokesman Mac Mullings. Mullings said the woman had previously been hospitalized for “a number of...

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'It's Time To End This Forever War.' Biden Says Forces To Leave Afghanistan By 9/11

Updated April 14, 2021 at 4:32 PM ET The United States will withdraw all remaining troops from Afghanistan by the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, President Biden announced Wednesday, turning the page on a conflict that has cost trillions of dollars and the lives of more than 2,300 American troops. "We went to Afghanistan because of a horrific attack that happened 20 years ago. That cannot explain why we should remain there in 2021," Biden said. "We were attacked, we went to war with...

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StudioTulsa

Our guest is Herman Pontzer, an Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology at Duke University and Associate Research Professor of Global Health at the Duke Global Health Institute. An well-known researcher in human energetics and evolution, he joins us to discuss his new book, "Burn: New Research Blows the Lid Off How We Really Burn Calories, Lose Weight, and Stay Healthy." The book draws on Pontzer's groundbreaking studies with hunter-gatherer tribes in order to show how exercise actually **doesn't** increase our metabolism.

(Note: This interview originally aired last summer.) We're pleased to welcome our friend John Wooley back to StudioTulsa. A longtime Tulsa-based music and pop-culture writer -- and the host, of course, of the popular Swing on This program, heard every Saturday night here on KWGS -- Wooley is the co-author, along with Brett Bingham, of a new book about the historic Cain's Ballroom.

Our guest is Nancy Pearl, the well-known librarian, bestselling author, and former executive director of the Washington Center for the Book at the Seattle Public Library. She's also a longtime book reviewer for KWGS-FM / Public Radio Tulsa, as she used to live and work in Tulsa, decades ago, before relocating to Washington State. We're very pleased to welcome Nancy back to StudioTulsa; she joins us to recommend several books she's been particularly enjoying over the past (often quite solitary) year or so.

(Note: This interview first aired last year.) Our guest is David Nasaw, the bestselling author and noted historian. He joins us to discuss his book, "The Last Million: Europe's Displaced Persons from World War to Cold War." It offers a far-reaching history of the one million refugees left behind in Germany after WWII, a disparate group that Nasaw refers to as "the last million." As explained in this careful documentation of postwar displacement and statelessness, the fate of "the last million" has been largely unknown, or hidden, until now.

(Note: This interview first aired last year.) Our guest is Emily Contois, Assistant Professor of Media Studies here at The University of Tulsa. Her recently published book, which she tells us about, is "Diners, Dudes, and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture." It is, per Library Journal, "a fascinating work of cultural studies that makes evident the continued power and threat of explicitly gendered food production and consumption in the 21st century.

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David Moss Correction Center-Booking photo

Tula, ok – Prosecutors mull death penalty in case


TULSA, Okla. (AP) The Tulsa County District Attorney says a man accused of fatally shooting a Tulsa businessman could face the death penalty.

Twenty-three-year-old Terrico Bethel was charged yesterday with first-degree murder in the Sept. 4 death of Neal Sweeney at Sweeney's company, Retail Fuels Marketing.

DA Tim Harris said today the case would meet the legal threshold for the death penalty if Bethel is convicted of taking money in exchange for the killing.

KWGS News

Tulsa, OK – Walking the Halls of the U.S. Senate office building is Court of Appeals Second District Judge Sonia Sotomayor. As President Obama's nominee to the U-S Supreme Court, she is allowing Senators to get a chance to know her prior to her confirmation hearing. Today, we hear from someone who already knows the Judge well. Dr. Robert Spoo is an associate professor of law at the University of Tulsa. In 2001-and 2002, he served as a clerk in Judge Sotomayor's chamber.

U.S. Department of Energy

Oklahoma City – OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) Oklahoma Indian leaders are being encouraged to consider wind power especially for tribal casinos, medical clinics and administrative projects.

Speakers at a Sovereignty Symposium in Oklahoma City say wind turbines could be a clean, cost-effective way of providing electricity.

Osage tribal member and Chermac Energy Corporation president Jaime McAlpine says wind projects would also create tribal jobs.

Oklahoma City, OK – Slight revenue shortfall declared in Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) State Treasurer Scott Meacham has declared a slight revenue shortfall for Oklahoma but says the affect on most state agencies will be minimal.

Meacham said today that revenue collections for May were $357.1 million, or about 21.8 percent below estimates. That means state agencies will receive 1.42 percent less in their June allocations.

KWGS News

Tulsa, OK – It was a split vote, but the Tulsa City Council has approved an assessment fee to finance the new baseball park in downtown Tulsa. The vote was 5-to-4. The 6 1/2 cent per square foot fee is for all property inside the IDL with the exception of churches, the federal government and homes with homestead exemption. It is expected the fee will raise $25 million to help finance the ballpark.

KWGS News

Tulsa, OK – "Don't trust anyone over 30." That was the cry from youth of turbulent 1960s.

Sapulpa, OK – Paragon to lay off workers in Sapulpa, Muskogee

SAPULPA, Okla. (AP) Pipe maker Paragon Industries is announcing plans to lay off 105 employees from its plants in Sapulpa and Muskogee.

Company officials say cheap steel pipe being imported from China makes it difficult to compete. Paragon makes steel pipe for the oil and construction industries.

The layoffs will begin in mid-July and involve 90 production workers and 15 support staff members, About 10 of the layoffs will be at the plant in Muskogee.

The Kiwanis Club of Tulsa

Tulsa, OK – Miss Oklahoma preliminaries continue

TULSA, Okla. (AP) Miss University of Oklahoma has picked up a $1,000 cash scholarship in the talent competition on the second preliminary night of the 2009 Miss Oklahoma pageant.

Twenty-one-year-old Taylor Treat of Ada performed ballet on pointe to "Palladio" last night. Treat is a senior human relations major at the university.

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