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Oklahoma First Responders Get High-Tech Tool to Use in Opioid Crisis

First responders and public health agencies can now see overdose information across Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics is offering access to the nationwide Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program, or ODMAP. Developed through the federal High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas program, ODMAP lets agencies share data on overdoses in real time by entering nine pieces of information into a smart phone app. Agencies can see overdose trends and even set an alert for when they spike. ...

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Carol Durkee

Bixby Bomber Found Not Guilty By Reason of Insanity

A man accused of detonating a pipe bomb outside an Oklahoma military recruiting station has been found not guilty by reason of insanity. Court records in Tulsa indicate a federal judge handed down the verdict Tuesday to 29-year-old Benjamin Roden. The former Air Force senior airman was indicted for destruction of government property after a pipe bomb exploded in front of an unoccupied Air Force recruiting station near Tulsa on July 10, 2017. No one was hurt. The ruling states psychological...

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Following Crash, All F-35s Temporarily Grounded For Inspections

All F-35 fighter jets deployed to the U.S. and its allies have been temporarily grounded following a crash of one of the aircraft in South Carolina last month. In a statement, the F-35 Joint Program Office said the U.S. and its international partners had suspended flights of the Joint Strike Fighter, also known as the Lightening II, until a fleet-wide inspection of the aircraft's fuel tubes is completed. "If suspect fuel tubes are installed, the part will be removed and replaced," the...

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Two Scoops: The Museum of Ice Cream and The New York Times

StudioTulsa

On this installment of ST, we learn about a remarkable and newly launched exhibit at Gilcrease, "Americans All!" This show, which is ongoing, is (per the Gilcrease website) the museum's "latest exhibition drawn from [its] permanent collection...[and it] showcases the many positive contributions immigrants have made, and continue to make, to American life and culture.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, an interesting discussion with Dr. Ira Byock, one of the nation's leading palliative care physicians. Also known for his work as a writer and longtime public advocate for improving end-of-life care, Dr. Byock will soon (as in, tomorrow night, the 9th) give a free-to-the-public lecture at the Cascia Hall Auditorium here in Tulsa on "What Mortality Can Teach Us About Living." His book, "The Four Things That Matter Most," is now out in a Tenth Anniversary Edition. Dr.

The Tulsa Symphony Orchestra will soon kick off its new season with an Opening Night Gala Concert at the Tulsa PAC. (It happens tomorrow night, Saturday the 6th, with more info posted here.) On the program, the lyrical and masterful cello concerto by Dvorák, which will feature a guest appearance by the world-renowned cellist, Lynn Harrell.

On this edition of our show, we chat with Emily Zilber. A former curator at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and currently the editor of Metalsmith magazine, Zilber is now in Tulsa to serve as the curator for VisionMakers 2018 at 108 Contemporary. This show, which is the gallery's juried biennial exhibition, features the work of contemporary craft-based artists from a multi-state region, all of whom combine cutting-edge concepts with traditional skills in order to push the boundaries of art, craft, and design.

Our guest is Wendy Sherman, a Senior Counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group and a former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs. Ambassador Sherman is also a Senior Fellow at Harvard's Belfer Center and is a member of both the Council on Foreign Relations and the Aspen Strategy Group. She was also a Chief Negotiator for the Iran Nuclear Deal; her newly published memoir is called "Not for the Faint of Heart: Lessons in Courage, Power, and Persistence." She was a guest recently of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations.

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They claim to help you sleep, make your hair grow, speed weight loss, improve your sex life and ward off the nasty cold going around the office. Though it's often impossible to tell if dietary supplements work, consumers generally feel certain they can't hurt.

But they can.

I recently hosted a "pitch session" at the DIY Music Conference hosted by CD Baby in Nashville. It was an opportunity for independent artists to have their music heard and critiqued by a panel of music industry folks including a record producer, a music supervisor and music journalist.

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Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

At least 11 people have died from Hurricane Michael, which slammed into Florida's Panhandle with 155-mph winds on Wednesday. The storm hacked a trail of catastrophic destruction in Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia before finally heading back out over water.

Five deaths were reported in Virginia, in addition to four in Florida, one in Georgia and one in North Carolina.

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At 10 a.m. on Sept. 22, Granville Street in Vancouver turned into a river. Brightly colored cardboard salmon, bicycle floats and hundreds of people dressed in costumes flowed down the street, carrying huge silkscreen banners and flags as big as sails printed with the words "Wild Salmon Forever." People sang, beat drums and called the wild salmon home.

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Pope Francis has accepted the resignation of Cardinal Donald Wuerl, the archbishop of Washington, D.C., who has been accused of covering up sexual abuse scandals during his tenure as the bishop of Pittsburgh.

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