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Nowata Sheriff Resigns in Jail Conditions Dispute

The Nowata County Sheriff and several deputies resigned Monday over ongoing problems with the county jail. A judge ordered Sheriff Terry Barnett to return prisoners to the jail, which was evacuated last month over a carbon monoxide leak. Barnett said it hasn’t been fixed. "When I was elected, I said I would do the right thing. I was hopeful to see change in Nowata County, but now I see without support, it is only continuing to create a dangerous situation," Barnett said. An audit by Tulsa...

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Matt Trotter / KWGS

Tulsa City Council Meetings on Equality Indicators to Start in May

Public meetings on Tulsa’s Equality Indicators will begin in mid-May. City councilors agreed last week to hold four special meetings to look into racial disparities in policing identified in the report. Meeting dates have not been finalized. Each special meeting will follow an abbreviated regular council meeting. Those are held Wednesdays at 5 p.m. The special meetings will feature a panel of experts and professionals the council will hear from and ask questions of. The council will receive...

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Major Flooding In The Midwest Leaves 2 Dead, 2 Missing

In parts of the Midwest, floodwaters are starting to abate. But elsewhere, they're still rising. In Iowa and Nebraska, hundreds of homes are flooded. There are lakes where fields and roads should be. Local police departments are sending out motorboats instead of squad cars. Hornick, Iowa, resident Dale Ronfeldt's basement is flooded with 4 feet of water, Iowa Public Radio reports . "My washer and dryer are floating around down there somewhere," Ronfeldt said. A flood warning is in effect...

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Join Us for The Give & Take on Medicaid Expansion, The Oklahoma Plan, SB 605, and House Bill 1750

StudioTulsa

Photo by Bernie Guzik

Our guest is the locally based musician and photographer, Bernie Guzik. As a tuba player, the Ohio-born Guzik, who attended Julliard, has peformed with the New York Philharmonic, the American Symphony Orchestra, the Cleveland Orchestra, the Kansas City Philharmonic, the Tulsa Philharmonic, the Tulsa Symphony, and so forth. Now retired from music, he devotes more and more time to his other longtime passion: photography. Guzik tells us about this passion, which has led him to travel all over the world, documenting vanishing cultures with his camera.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Rubén Rengel, the 22-year-old Venezuelan violinist who won the 2018 Sphinx Competition, which is held annually for talented Black and Latino string players. Rengel will appear in Tulsa on Saturday night, the 16th, with the Signature Symphony at TCC. (More info and details on tickets are here.) On the program, Tchaikovsky's Concerto for Violin in D major, op. 35, which is a feature for Rengel, as well as Amy Beach's Symphony in E minor (a/k/a "the Gaelic").

Our guest is César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández, an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Denver. On Thursday the 14th, beginning at 6pm, he'll deliver the 19th Annual Buck Colbert Franklin Memorial Civil Rights Lecture on the TU campus. He'll speak on "Migrating to Prison: Immigration in the Age of Mass Incarceration," which is also the title of his forthcoming book. His academic interests center on "crimmigration law" -- meaning, the convergence of criminal law and immigration law. His previous book, "Crimmigration Law," was published by the American Bar Association in 2015.

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Our guest is John Brennan, the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency, where he served from 2013 to 2017. Previously a deputy national security advisor and assistant to President Barack Obama for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, Brennan today speaks to various audiences about how to both think of and respond to global events, terrorism, and cybersecurity concerns.

Faculty and fellows participating in the HEAL Initiative in Hinche, Haiti. (UC-San Francisco)

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, an interesting discussion of global health -- that is, thinking about the health and well-being of the world's populations in a global context, and moreover, about how to serve those populations by improving care (and achieving equity of care) for all people. It's about seeing health care as a basic human right, and thus as something that people all over the world are fully entitled to. Our guest is Dr. Phuoc Le of the University of California at San Francisco, who also teaches in the public health program at UC-Berkeley. Dr.

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Tulsa, OK – Report: Reclaiming mines would cost Oklahoma $143M


TULSA, Okla. (AP) Facing a daunting $143 million price tag for the work, Oklahoma may never reclaim some abandoned coal mines that pose a danger to people or the environment.

The state received a miniscule portion of that total in federal funding for such projects this year, and director Mike Kastl of the state Conservation Commission's abandoned mine lands program says some old mines may never be restored.

Sallisaw, OK – Liquor vote planned in Sequoyah County


SALLISAW, Okla. (AP) Voters in Sequoyah County will decide next week whether to allow sales of liquor by the drink.

Fifty of Oklahoma's 77 counties have begun serving liquor by the drink since it was legalized in Oklahoma in 1985, and neighboring LeFlore County recently approved a measure allowing the practice.

Bartlesville, OK – Woman considers options after missing spouse found

BARTLESVILLE, Okla. (AP) The attorney for a Bartlesville woman whose husband resurfaced after going missing for almost seven years says she is considering what to do next.

Attorney Alan Carlson has been advising Peggy Rockey since her husband, 58-year-old David Rockey, disappeared in August 2002.

Carlson says that Peggy Rockey, who now works at a Bartlesville day care center, still considers herself to be married.

Stillwater, OK – STILLWATER, Okla. (AP) An Oklahoma State University spokesman says a female OSU student has recovered after suffering from the swine flu.

That's one of three new cases reported today, bringing the state's total number of confirmed cases to 17.

OSU spokesman Gary Shutt says university graduates were told of the student's illness today during commencement exercises.

Oklahoma City, OK – OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) Gov. Brad Henry today vetoed legislation that would allow public schools to operate as charter schools free of many state school mandates.

Henry said that would turn back the clock on decades of education reforms.

The bill was supported by some school administrators and school boards who claimed it would have given them more local control. It was opposed by the Oklahoma Education Association, which said it could eliminate school librarians and counselors.

KWGS News

Tulsa, Oklahoma – Last week, we heard from Tulsa Mayor Kathy Taylor as she presented her proposed city budget to the Tulsa Council.

After a week to review, today, we hear from two members of the council. Both have concerns about the Mayor's $578 spending plan.

KWGS News

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma – Gas prices top $2 per gallon in Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) The price of gasoline has gone back above $2 per gallon in Oklahoma.

AAA Oklahoma reported Friday the average price of a gallon of self-serve regular gasoline in the state is just more than $2.02.

AAA spokesman Chuck Mai says it's difficult to find a reason for the increase other than a general feeling that the economy is starting to recover.

KWGS

Tulsa, Oklahoma – Springtime in Oklahoma!

May has been one soggy month with over eight inches of rain in some parts of Northeast Oklahoma and more on the way. Steve Peltz is the Meteorologist in Charge at the National Weather Service in Tulsa. He says predicting a heavy rain event is difficult.

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