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Fort Sill

Fort Sill Will House Refugee Children Again

The federal government has chosen a military base in Oklahoma as the location for a new temporary shelter to house migrant children and is considering a customs port in southern New Mexico as another option as existing shelters are overwhelmed. The Office of Refugee Resettlement said Tuesday it’s dealing with a dramatic spike in the number of children crossing the border without parents. The agency already has received referrals for nearly 41,000 kids so far this fiscal year, marking an...

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Dakota to Cushing Pipeline Proposed

Two companies are proposing a $1.6 billion pipeline to move North Dakota crude oil, making it the biggest such project to move oil out of the state since the Dakota Access pipeline that sparked violent clashes between protesters and law enforcement in 2016 and 2017. Houston-based Phillips 66 and Casper, Wyoming-based Bridger Pipeline announced the joint venture called Liberty Pipeline on Monday. It’s designed to move 350,000 barrels of oil daily — the bulk of which from western North Dakota’s...

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Newer Democrats Oppose Plan To Give Lawmakers A Raise

House Democrats looking to undo a decade-long pay freeze for lawmakers are rethinking their plans over fears the legislation could divide their own party. The fight is pitting pay-increase supporters, like House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., against newer Democrats who fear voters will be angry about lawmakers giving themselves a raise. "This is not just about members, this is about the institution of the House of Representatives and the United States Senate and our ability to be...

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StudioTulsa

AP Photo

As widespread clean-up and repairs begin to take shape in Northeastern Oklahoma, after the recent flood event -- the second "500-year flood" to occur in our community in 32 years, by the way -- many of us are wondering what needs to be done, in both the short and long term, to fix the levee system. Our guests are Tulsa County Commissioner Karen Keith and District 12 Levee Commissioner Todd  Kilpatrick, both of whom worked closely during the recent crisis with the Army Corps of Engineers, the National Guard, and an array of federal, state, and local officials.

(Note: This interview first aired last November.) Our guest is David Grann, a staff writer at The New Yorker Magazine. He's the bestselling author of "The Lost City of Z," "Killers of the Flower Moon," "The Old Man and the Gun," and other books. Grann joins us to discuss his newest work of nonfiction, "The White Darkness," which profiles one Henry Worsley, a family man and decorated British special forces officer who also happened to be obsessed with Ernest Shackleton, the 19th-century polar explorer.

Our guests are the father and son team of John and Denver Nicks, who join us to duscuss their newly published, co-written book, "Conviction: The Murder Trial That Powered Thurgood Marshall's Fight for Civil Rights." This book tells the true and shocking but little-remembered story of a triple murder that happened in 1939 near Hugo, Oklahoma. An African-American farm-hand named W.D. Lyons was wrongly accused of this crime, and his lawyer was one Thurgood Marshall, who was then a young counsel with the NAACP's newly created Legal Defense and Education Fund.

On this edition of ST, we're talking about two newly-opened photography shows, both on view in Tulsa at the Philbrook Downtown space through November 10th of this year. One exhibit documents a forgotten people; the other, a forgotten landscape.

On this edition of Medical Monday, as the Oklahoma Legislature has just recently completed its annual session, we offer a detailed review of whether and how our state's lawmakers have addressed various medical and healh-related issues. Our guest is Carly Putnam with the non-profit, non-partisan Oklahoma Policy Institute, where she serves as Policy Director and Health Care Policy Analyst.

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