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Park Officials Mark Gathering Place Anniversary With Time Capsule Dedication

gathering_place_time_capsule.jpg
Matt Trotter
/
KWGS

Mark your calendars for 2069!

To celebrate the Gathering Place’s one-year anniversary, park officials are burying a time capsule to be opened 50 years from now. Executive Director Tony Moore said the contents reflect the park’s mission.

"We’re a park for all generations, for all people to gather together regardless of age, culture, socioeconomics, race, ZIP code. And so, it’s important this legacy continues as Tulsa continues to embrace an inclusive culture for everyone," Moore said.

Juan Miret visited the Gathering Place 100 days in a row and was picked to put something in the capsule. Miret, a Venezuelan immigrant who’s lived in the U.S. 18 years now, chose a painting honoring those who come with a suitcase and their dreams for a better life.

"And what better place than the Gathering Place, that accepts and welcomes everyone? So, I hope in 50 years, my daughter will be able to see this painting, remember the roots, remember where we come from," Miret said.

The time capsule also includes letters, a book, Native American items symbolizing the next generation, and information from Tulsa Public Schools. Additional items were picked by Gathering Place ambassador Ariana Reagor, Tulsa Public Schools Teacher of the Year Nicole Powell and Indian Affairs Commission member Dorcas Williams.

At 104 years old, Tulsa Race Massacre survivor Lessie Benningfield Randle attended the dedication to offer her hopes for the future — that Tulsa would grow together.

"I would love to see everybody considered as a brother — everybody considered as a brother — and help each other not to risk withdrawing as we are doing now," Randle said.

Park officials will choose two members of the community to put keepsakes in the time capsule before it’s buried in the park.