Otis Hart

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

Scott Walker, a pop singer who gave up stardom to carve out one of the most original and uncompromising careers in modern music, died Friday. He was 76. His record label, 4AD, announced Walker's death on Monday morning and later told NPR that the cause of death was cancer.

Walker was best-known for his work with blue-eyed soul trio The Walker Brothers in the 1960s, but it was his late-career trilogy of challenging art-rock albums that defined his reputation as one of avant-garde music's most electrifying auteurs.

Dick Dale, the surf rock pioneer who took reverb to new levels, died on Saturday night. He was 81. The guitarist's health had declined over the past 20 years due to a number of illnesses, including diabetes, kidney disease and rectal cancer. The news was confirmed to NPR by Dusty Watson, a drummer who worked and toured with Dale between 1995 and 2006, who says he spoke with Dale's wife, Lana Dale. No cause was given.

Keith Flint, a provocative frontman of British dance act The Prodigy who helped bring electronic music into America's mainstream, has died at the age of 49.

No cause of death was confirmed, though The Prodigy's Liam Howlett wrote on Monday morning that "our brother Keith took his own life over the weekend."

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Bandcamp playlist at the bottom of the page.

Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhannsson, one of the avant-garde's most beloved film scorers, died Friday in Berlin, Germany. His death was confirmed by his manager, Tim Husom, but according to an official statement, the cause is unknown at this time. He was 48 years old.

Updated Saturday 4:15 p.m

Nelly, the rapper behind hits "Hot In Herre" and "Ride Wit Me," was arrested Saturday morning for alleged sexual assault during a tour stop in Washington state.

The Auburn Police Department said in a statement that a woman called 911 at 3:48 a.m. Saturday and said she was assaulted by Nelly, whose given name is Cornell Haynes Jr. After a police investigation, Nelly was taken into custody an hour later.

Walter Becker, co-founder of Steely Dan, died Sunday at the age of 67, according to his website.

The last Scottish monarch died more than 300 years ago, but if England's departure from the European Union goes through, a wary Scotland just might be in the business for a new king. And as luck would have it for scotophilic aesthetes, Alasdair Roberts appears up for the job.

Larry Coryell, the jazz guitarist known as the "Godfather of Fusion," died Sunday night at a hotel in New York City, according to his publicist. He was 73.

Coryell was still performing more than 50 years after his first recordings. He played at New York jazz club Iridium on Friday and Saturday nights, and had plans for a summer tour with his fusion group The Eleventh House.

UPDATE: The Newport Folk Festival has wrapped up until next year. Follow NPR Music on Facebook and Twitter and you'll be alerted when we publish select sets from the festival this week.

NPR Music went to the Newport Folk Festival this weekend to record sets from Courtney Barnett, Jason Isbell, The Lone Bellow, Lord Huron, Luluc and more. We'll publish the recordings early next week. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for live updates, photos and videos from the grounds.

Sunday-morning music is too often overlooked. For the most part, we check out music news while we're sitting at our desks at work, usually during a glance at our social-media feeds. That sort of interaction is inherently brief — we scroll, maybe click, and then it's back to the grind.

Late night on Friday at the SXSW music festival is usually when the delirium sets in. After three consecutive 16-hour days of live music, even the sharpest brains begin to lose it (so you can imagine what state ours were in). In other words, it was an opportune moment to meet up with British songwriter Laura Marling, who owns a voice as clear as the bells at the top of nearby St. David's Episcopal Church.

I can't think of a master musician more out of sync with contemporary culture than Alasdair Roberts. The Scottish singer and guitarist tills Albion's millennium of traditional songcraft to express ancient emotions — usually with just the aid of an acoustic guitar, but occasionally with ornate instrumentation like oboes or clarinets. When he's not giving voice to aural heirlooms, he's writing songs in a similar tradition; music that could be described as British folk, but that conjures an even earlier time than Anne Briggs or Fairport Convention ever did.