Rachel Martin

After four years in the shadow of Brock Turner, the man who sexually assaulted her, the woman once known in the media as "Emily Doe" has taken her name back.

In 2015, Christopher Ingraham wrote a story for The Washington Post that changed his life.

As a data reporter for the paper, the story's topic — the USDA's "natural amenities index," which measures U.S. counties based on things like climate and topography – came with the territory. But it's what he calls a "throwaway line" he wrote that set him and his family on their new path — from daily East Coast grind to full-on "Minnesota nice" in the Midwest.

Historians and critics have pored over the recordings of these jazz greats like Miles Davis, John Coltrane and Stan Getz so exhaustively, it might feel like they've left no stone unturned. And yet, fans are seeing a slew of exciting new discoveries lately from these and other artists — so-called "lost" albums by some of the biggest names in jazz.

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Could it happen again? Two years after Hurricane Maria, a major storm is headed towards Puerto Rico.

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The writer Ibram X. Kendi has made a name for himself by tackling one of the most important — and one of the most sensitive — topics in America today.

His 2017 book, Stamped From the Beginning, is a history of racist ideas in America, and his new book is called How to Be an Antiracist. It starts with a moment in Kendi's own life: He was a high school senior taking part in an oratorical contest honoring Martin Luther King Jr., delivering a speech that ultimately won him first place.

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Jeffrey Epstein, the wealthy financier awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges, was found dead inside a Manhattan jail cell Saturday from an apparent suicide.

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R. Kelly Faces Federal Charges

Jul 12, 2019

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South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg got a really big boost to his campaign recently, announcing a staggering $24.8 million fundraising haul over the past three months.

But that hasn't changed one of the toughest realities his candidacy faces: support among black voters that barely registers in the polls.

What is the president actually allowed to do under the U.S. Constitution?

It's a question that's comes up from time to time at NPR, and when it does, we've turned to experts such as Kim Wehle, now a law professor and CBS News legal commentator. Now, she's written a book about it. It's called How to Read the Constitution — and Why.

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Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has not been shy about framing his candidacy to become the 2020 Democratic nominee for president around global climate change.

In his policy proposal he says that defeating climate change is the "defining challenge of our time," and that it is incumbent upon the next president of the United States to make that challenge a priority.

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It looks like a landslide victory for Prime Minister Narendra Modi in India. Votes are still being counted today after elections that lasted six weeks. NPR's Lauren Frayer has been following all of it, and she joins us live from Mumbai.

National attention is turning to issues that have been central to Kirsten Gillibrand's years of public service: equality and reproductive rights.

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With surprisingly good job numbers this morning - unemployment has fallen to the lowest level in almost 50 years. Employers added 263,000 new jobs last month. That's more than analysts had been expecting. And it's another sign that the U.S. economy keeps moving along after almost a decade of economic growth. NPR economics correspondent Scott Horsley is with us this morning. Hi, Scott.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Rachel.

MARTIN: Pretty encouraging jobs numbers here - what do they tell us?

Workers with a steady paycheck already know that wages have been stubbornly slow to rise. Meanwhile, those who get health insurance through a job have seen their deductibles shoot up. In fact, says Noam Levey, a health care reporter for the Los Angeles Times, deductibles have, on average, quadrupled over the last dozen years. As a result, even some people who have health insurance are having trouble affording medical care.

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The attorney general, William Barr, is testifying this morning before the Senate Judiciary Committee. It's his first appearance before Congress since the release of the special counsel's report.

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Sixty years ago, this month, Miles Davis finished recording Kind of Blue, perhaps his greatest masterpiece and still jazz's bestselling album. But it was not the only milestone recorded that year.

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The U.S. economy keeps growing. The pace of growth was strong in the first three months of the year. Now a report from the Commerce Department this morning shows better-than-expected annual growth in the first quarter of 3.2%. Just a few weeks ago, forecasters were warning of a sharp slowdown in economic growth. A rebound in consumer spending helped turn things around, among other factors, which NPR's Scott Horsley is in the studio to explain.

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