Robin Hilton

For most of her performance at the Tiny Desk, Nataile Mering, the transfixing voice behind Weyes Blood, sang with her eyes closed, lost and blissed out in the gently sweeping sounds. She didn't say a word until just before the last song, when she smiled and thanked everyone for coming. But you could feel the warmth and beauty and yearning in what was a tranquil, stirring set.

Fifty-five years after first forming in London, The Who is back with an album of brand-new songs. WHO, due out later this fall, will be the band's 12th studio record. It includes the first single, "Ball & Chain," a gritty swamp-rock critique of the Guantanamo Bay detention camp and the powers that have kept it open.

"Down in Guantanamo," Roger Daltrey sings, "we still got that ball and chain. That pretty piece of Cuba designed to cause men pain."

The 2010s are almost over, so we want to know: Which albums, songs and artists defined the decade? What moments (the death of David Bowie or Prince, for example) or trends (streaming, social media) will we most remember?

To be clear, we're talking January 2010 to the end of December 2019.

Tells us about it in the poll below. (You don't have to fill out every field unless you want to.) We'll feature some of your ideas in an upcoming episode of All Songs Considered.

Capitol Records is sharing an early take of The Beatles song "Oh! Darling," along with a completely remixed version of the track. The two cuts appear on a 50th anniversary edition of the band's penultimate studio album, Abbey Road.

Note: With hosts Bob Boilen and Robin Hilton away this week, we've got an encore presentation of The Worst Songs Of All Time, from Feb. 2014.


Guitarist, actor, writer (and former Monitor Mix blogger) Carrie Brownstein joins us, along with NPR Music's Stephen Thompson, to do something we don't normally do: Talk about the songs we really, really don't like.

It's a packed release week, starting with Western Stars, Bruce Springsteen's lush and loving ode to mid-'60s orchestral pop. The metal band Baroness ventures into prog-rock territory with its most ambitiously artful release to date, while British spoken word artist Kate Tempest takes listeners on a head-spinning journey into the heart of modern anxiety. All of those, plus the most joyful album to date from Bill Callahan, DMV rapper Goldink and more.

Our shortlist for the best new albums out this week includes the roots-rock duo Ida Mae, a stirring gospel record from disco legend Gloria Gaynor, the ruminative rock of Palehound, an ode to the African diaspora from Santana, a collaboration between Stef Chura and Will Toledo of Car Seat Headrest and more. Host Robin Hilton is joined by NPR Music's Ann Powers, Felix Contreras, Marissa Lorusso and Stephen Thompson as they share their picks for the best releases of June 7.

Featured Albums:

The Prince Estate has announced plans to release another album of previously unreleased tracks recorded between 1981 and 1991. The album, titled Originals, will be available June 7 exclusively on Tidal's Hi-Fi subscription tier, with physical copies, downloads and wider streaming services following on June 21. It features 15 demo versions of songs Prince wrote and recorded for other artists, including Sheila E., The Time and Kenny Rogers. Fourteen of the tracks have never been released before.

Sleater-Kinney has confirmed it's releasing a new album sometime this year, produced by St. Vincent. Guitarist Carrie Brownstein tells NPR, "We always planned on getting back in the studio — it was just a matter of when. If there is an overarching principle to this album, it's that the tools on which we were relying proved inadequate.

On this week's sprint through the best new releases we've got irresistible earworms from Peter Bjorn & John, the deep soul of PHONY PPL, Esperanza Spalding's mind-bending songcraft and more. All Songs Considered's Robin Hilton is joined by NPR Music's Ann Powers, Lars Gotrich, Nate Chinen of WBGO, Sidney Madden and Stephen Thompson as they breakdown the best albums out on Oct. 19.

Featured Albums:

  1. Elle King: Shake the Spirit
    Featured Song: "Shame"

Our list of the best new albums out this week includes the comical and moving synth pop of John Grant, enchanting harmonies from The Watson Twins, an audacious jazz album from trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire, the first new music from Elvis Costello & The Imposers in a decade and more. Host Robin Hilton returns to breakdown this week's essential releases with NPR Music's Ann Powers and Stephen Thompson, and Nate Chinen from WBGO.

Featured Albums

  1. Elvis Costello & The Imposters: Look Now
    Featured Song: "Under Lime"

Bob Dylan's Bootleg series continues this fall with Vol. 14, More Blood, More Tracks. The 6-CD box set (or two LPs) focuses on material Dylan recorded in 1974, which ultimately led to one of his most acclaimed and best-selling albums, Blood on the Tracks.

It's an exciting week for new music. All Songs Considered's Robin Hilton talks to NPR's Rodney Carmichael, Ann Powers, Stephen Thompson and Tom Huizenga, along with WBGO's Nate Chinen about the best releases for June 29. This includes Drake's highly-anticipated double album, Scorpion, Florence and the Machine's tentative turn toward optimism with High as Hope, previously unheard and unreleased music from jazz legend John Coltrane and much more.

Featured Albums

On this week's episode of New Music Friday, All Songs Considered's Robin Hilton chats with NPR Music's Ann Powers and Rodney Carmichael, along with jazz critic Nate Chinen from WBGO about the most exciting new releases for June 22. Albums include the intense, industrial rock of Nine Inch Nails, the new joint project of Lecrae & Zaytoven and the wildly ambitious, shape-shifting jazz of Kamasi Washington.

Featured Albums

  1. Nine Inch Nails: Bad Witch
    Featured Song: "Ahead Of Ourselves"

On this week's New Music Friday, All Songs Considered's Robin Hilton is joined by NPR Music's Ann Powers, Rodney Carmichael, and Stephen Thompson for a quick run through the best new releases for June 15. Highlights include Christina Aguilera's Liberation, a monument to self-empowerment with contributions from Kanye West and Anderson .Paak; the trippy, futuristic debut of pop producer SOPHIE; and a deeply emotional solo project from Linkin Park co-founder Mike Shinoda.

Featured Albums

All Songs Considered's Robin Hilton takes a quick run through May 11's essential album releases with NPR Music's Felix Contreras, Jewly Hight, Tom Huizenga, Lyndsey McKenna and Stephen Thompson. Featured albums include the irresistible pop of Charlie Puth, classical pianist Simone Dinnerstein, early folk recordings from The Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia, infectious guitar rock from Illuminati Hotties and more.

All Songs Considered's Robin Hilton chats with NPR Music's Lars Gotrich, Tom Huizenga, Marissa Lorusso, Sidney Madden and Ann Powers about some of the best new albums dropping on Apr. 6, from the scorching punk of Norway's Dark Times to the mesmerizing cello drones of Clarice Jensen, rap phenom Cardi B, dance pop singer Kylie Minogue's country turn and much more.

Featured Albums

  • Dark Times: Tell Me What I Need
  • Christina Vantzou: No. 4
  • Cardi B: Invasion of Privacy

The latest video from Malian singer and guitarist Fatoumata Diawara, for the song "Nterini," opens with a simple but stark reminder: "In a world of seven billion people, one billion are migrants." The Pew Research Center puts the number at a quarter of a billion — a figure that's still shockingly high.

The best film scores walk a delicate line: They help propel the story, guide an audience's emotions and are also often a distinct character, with a role and voice as important as any actor's — but they also have to do all that without getting in the way, or drawing too much attention.

It's hard to think of an artist who's brought more joy to more people, across more generations — and in more ways — than Steve Martin. In the 1970s, he won the hearts of young children for his playful appearances with The Muppets while simultaneously charming legions of older fans with his subversive standup routines. Later, as an actor, he wrote and starred in some of the most memorable comedies (and a few dramas) of all time, while writing books, plays and even a Broadway musical.

Back in 2001, not long after All Songs Considered started, Bob Boilen and I made what was one of the show's first-ever musical discoveries, a then new band called The Be Good Tanyas. The trio of young women from Vancouver made incredibly infectious folk with the sweetest harmonies and a swoon-inducing surplus of innocent charm.

Grab your hanky — you're gonna need it for this week's episode of All Songs Considered. Bob Boilen and I certainly did while reading and listening to all of the incredible stories we received from listeners about the songs that remind them of their moms. Some were funny, some were dark (a few of you have issues way above our pay grade), but most were heartfelt and full of joy, sometimes grief, but always ending with unconditional love.

For this week's show, Bob Boilen and I throw open the studio door to welcome a parade of guests from the NPR Music team, each sharing their favorite April releases. This includes Jake Witz, one of our fabulous Spring interns, who has some relatively restrained music from U.K. grime artist Mr. Mitch.

So I took last Friday off to clean out my garage and ended up using the time to listen to the new Kendrick record, DAMN. over and over again. It was a glorious, uninterrupted stretch of several hours, but even that wasn't enough to really understand everything he covers on it. DAMN. is dense, packed with religious imagery, deep thoughts on race, fame and identity, and a whole lot of personal stories and memories. Those are some initial observations.

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