Bynum Re-Elected as Tulsa Mayor

Aug 25, 2020

Credit City of Tulsa

Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum won a second term Tuesday night, taking 51.9% of the votes, according to the Oklahoma State Election Board's unofficial results.

Candidates in Tuesday's elections needed more than half the votes to win outright. Contests where no candidate received more than half the votes will go to a runoff between the top two.

Community organizer Greg Robinson, Bynum's main challenger, won 28.8% of the votes. Project manager Ken Reddick, who painted himself as a more conservative option than Bynum, got 13.8% of the vote. All other candidates got less than 3%.

Bynum outperformed Robinson in absentee and in-person voting by wide margins. Robinson had an eight-vote edge in early voting.

City council

District 1: Incumbent Vanessa Hall-Harper won re-election with 63.8% of the vote over Jerry Goodwin.

District 2: Jeannie Cue was unopposed.

District 3: Incumbent Crista Patrick won re-election with 58.9% of the vote over Paul Eicher.

District 4: Incumbent Kara Joy McKee won re-election with 61.1% of the vote, beating three challengers.

District 5: Incumbent Cass Fahler got 36.3% of the vote and heads to a runoff against Mykey Arthrell, who got 29.6%. Four candidates challenged Fahler.

District 6: Incumbent Connie Dodson goes to a runoff against Christian Bengel. Dodson received 46.2% of the vote, while Bengel got 33.6% and Cheyenna Morgan got 20.2%.

District 7: Incumbent Lori Decter Wright received 47.2% of the vote and heads to a runoff against Justin Van Kirk, who got 38.2%. Chad Ferguson got 14.6%.

District 8: Phil Lakin was unopposed.

District 9: Jayme Fowler wins the seat over LeeAnn Crosby with 53% of the vote. Councilor Ben Kimbro did not run for re-election.

Charter amendments

Voters passed all five proposed amendments to the city charter.

Proposition 1, which removes outdated references to partisan elections, got 58% of the vote.

Proposition 2, which replaces around a dozen words in the charter with gender-neutral terms, got 54.7%.

Proposition 3, which lets the mayor remove members of authorities, boards and commissions, got 63.7%.

Proposition 4, which requires the mayor's choice of city attorney to be confirmed by a majority vote of the city council, got 63.4%.

Proposition 5, which clarifies the city attorney advises the city auditor and council as well as the mayor, and clarifies the city attorney's opposition to a proposed ordinance can't stop it from being enacted, got 73.2%.