StudioTulsa on 89.5-1

Weekdays 11:30am and 7:30pm
  • Hosted by Rich Fisher

StudioTulsa features down-to-earth interviews that make sense of complex issues and offer new perspectives on topics we might take for granted. It's an award-winning program covering the arts, sciences, news events, books, politics, culture, economics, history, social trends, the media, the humanities, and so forth --- and it's been a popular show here at Public Radio Tulsa ever since it began in August of 1992.

Medical Mondays with Dr. John Schumann are heard each Monday.

The program is hosted by Rich Fisher and produced/edited by Scott Gregory.

Visit the StudioTulsa Archives.

What happens when we as a society stop trusting our experts, stop consulting our longtime scholars, and stop listening to our intelligence-community professionals? What happens to our foreign policy? How are this nation's relationships with the rest of the world affected? How is our government itself altered? Our guest on ST is the conservative writer and scholar, Tom Nichols, who is also a Professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College.

Albert Bierstadt, Buffalo Hunt, 1860. Oil on canvas, Private Collection, image courtesy of Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Our guest is Laura Fry, the Senior Curator and Curator of Art at Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. She is also one of the curators of a striking new show at that museum, which she tells us about. Per the Gilcrease website: "Gilcrease Museum and the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody, Wyoming, have partnered to present the groundbreaking exhibition 'Albert Bierstadt: Witness to a Changing West.' Albert Bierstadt (1830–1902) is best known as one of America's premier western landscape artists.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Teresa Carr, a journalist who wrote the cover story for the January 2019 issue of Consumer Reports. As this in-depth article (titled "Medical Screening Tests You Do and Don't Need") notes near the outset: "Today, as we've learned more about how to detect disease early, there are scores of blood tests, ultrasounds, and CT scans to screen for conditions like cancer and low bone density.

Our guest on ST is the locally based photographer and writer, Rhys Martin, who joins us to discuss his new book: "Lost Restaurants of Tulsa." The book is just out, and it reveals the histories of dozens of restaurants from T-Town's past -- family sagas, culinary wonders, beloved diners, edge-of-town favorites, popular hang-outs, and more. It's a book that's sure to appeal to those who can lip-smackingly recall the likes of Pennington's, Shotgun Sam's, Villa Venice, The Golden Drumstick, The Razor Clam, St. Michael's Alley, The Louisiane, et al.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're discussing a special presentation of George Frideric Handel's Messiah. The beloved Baroque-era masterwork -- a timeless holiday favorite -- will be presented this coming Saturday and Sunday, the 8th and 9th, at Saint John's Church in Tulsa (at 4200 South Atlanta Place). Our guests are the special visiting conductor for this concert, Timothy Brown, and the organist and choirmaster at Saint John's, Joseph Arndt.

Photo by The Daily Beast

Our guest on ST is the celebrated British writer Hilary Mantel, who is the newest recipient of the Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award, which is given annually by the Tulsa Library Trust. Mantel is the author of several books, including the historical novels "Wolf Hall" and "Bring Up the Bodies," which both recount the life of Thomas Cromwell, the "political fixer" best known for his tenure in the court of Henry VIII. Mantel speaks with us about these and other of her very popular works.

Our guest is Anna Leahy, director of the Creative Writing Program at Chapman University. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Tumor." A brief yet thoughtful volume that is part memoir, part study, and part history, the book was thus praised by Prof. Kristen Iversen at the University of Cincinnati: "In clear, compelling language, Leahy writes with insight and empathy about cancer and the social and cultural dimensions of one of our greatest fears.

Photo by KWGS News

Our guest is State Senator Kevin Matthews, who recently held a press conference to announce that the name of the 1921 Race Riot Commission has been officially changed to the 1921 Race Massacre Commission. As Matthews, who chairs this Commission, noted at the conference: "The fact that it was called a riot was one of the reasons given for turning down insurance claims, and it has been offensive to many in the affected area for 97 years.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in August.) Our guest is the award-winning British author and journalist William Atkins, whose latest book -- a dense and engrossing blend of history, memoir, geography, and travel writing -- is called "The Immeasurable World: Journeys in Desert Places." It's a work that, per The Wall Street Journal, "courts comparisons with the capaciously learned nature writing of John McPhee. But there's also an open-ended spiritual quest to Mr.

Our guest is the noted playwright, Sarah Ruhl, a Tony Award nominee and the author of "100 Essays I Don't Have Time to Write," which was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She tells us about her newest book, a collection of moving and insightful letters between herself and Max Ritvo (1990-2016). Ruhl teaches at the Yale School of drama, and Ritvo -- a noted poet who died young of cancer -- had been one of her favorite students.

Our guest is Teresa Miller, the local author and Director Emerita of the Center for Poets and Writers at OSU. Miller is also the co-editor of a new anthology, which she tells us about: "Love Can Be: A Literary Collection about Our Animals." It's a gathering of about thirty acclaimed authors, all of them celebrating pets, animals, creatures, and other forms of life: cats, birds, frogs, butterflies, bears, dogs, raccoons, horses, etc.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dan Weissmann, a veteran radio reporter for outlets like Marketplace, 99 Percent Invisible, Planet Money, and Chicago's WBEZ. He joins us to talk about his new podcast, An Arm and a Leg, which focuses on the cost of health care in the U.S. Weissmann is the host and executive producer of this podcast, which just launched earlier this month. As noted at the Arm and a Leg website: "Health care -- and how much it costs -- is scary. But you're not alone with this stuff, and knowledge is power.

PHOTO BY LAUREN SILBERMAN

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we offer another edition of our ongoing Museum Confidential podcast, which is co-created twice monthly by Public Radio Tulsa and Philbrook Museum of Art. This time around, MC visits California's High Desert with its roving correspondent, Preston Poe (of The Preston Poe Show podcast). As we often say, there are many kinds of museums.... One of them is a tiny, refurbished photo-processing booth located in Joshua Tree, which is now dedicated entirely to crochet.

(Note: This interview first aired back in June.) Our guest is Allen Gannett, the founder and CEO of TrackMaven, a software analytics firm whose clients have included Microsoft, Marriott, Home Depot, Aetna, and Honda.

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) On this edition of ST, an interesting discussion with Hannibal B. Johnson, the Tulsa-based attorney, local historian, and prolific author. He joins us to talk about his book, "The Sawners of Chandler: A Pioneering Power Couple in Pre-Civil Rights Oklahoma." As is noted of this eye-opening book at Mr.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Judy Melinek, a board-certified forensic pathologist practicing forensic medicine in California's Bay Area, where she is also the CEO of PathologyExpert, Inc. Lately, Dr.

Photo by Steve Clem

The Sand Springs Cultural & Historical Museum is presenting the artwork of the late Louisiana Cajun painter, George Rodrigue. Rodrigue is best known for his "blue dog" paintings, which he created over the last two decades of his life, but throughout his career, he painted numerous images depicting the people and places of his south Louisiana home. 

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we get to know Ricco Wright, who owns and operates the nonprofit Black Wall Street Gallery, a recently created art space on Greenwood Avenue. After Wright graduated from Union High School, he studied mathematics as a Bill Gates Scholar at Langston University. Thereafter he earned a doctorate in math at Columbia University, after which he lived and worked in New York City for a decade. As Wright tells us, his own passion for the arts -- visual, musical, verbal, and otherwise -- flourished considerably while he was based in NYC.

News flash: Cats do not meow at random. Nor do they hiss because they have nothing better to do. Cat sounds do have a purpose -- and they can carry important messages. But what ARE those messages? Our guest on ST has some very interesting answers: Susanne Schötz, a professor at Lund University in Sweden, is part of a long-standing research program exploring how and why cats use vocal communication...with each other and with their human caretakers. Schötz has a new book out called "The Secret Language of Cats: How to Understand Your Cat for a Better, Happier Relationship."

(Note: This interview first aired late last year.) Our guest is Leslie Berlin, who is the Project Historian for the Silicon Valley Archives at Stanford University. Originally from Tulsa, Berlin has a book out that offers nothing less than the history of Silicon Valley. As was noted of this book by The New York Times: "[A] deeply researched and dramatic narrative of Silicon Valley's early years.... Meticulously told stories permit the reader to gain a nuanced understanding of the emergence of the broader technology ecosystem that has enabled Silicon Valley to thrive....

On this edition of our program, we're discussing a recent DHS-related proposal put forth by the Trump Administration as well as local efforts to challenge this proposal. The proposal in question would change the accepted ferderal definition of Public Charge, which is a term used by immigration officials to refer to certain legal immigrants who are able to receive government benefits like food assistance, housing assistance, and health care.

Photo by Erin Baiano

On the 100th anniversary of the end of "The War to End All Wars," the Tulsa Symphony will commemorate those lost in that war and all the wars that followed with a performance of Benjamin Britten's War Requiem. The work ingeniously combines the text of the Latin funeral mass with the war poetry of Wilfred Owen, a young British poet who served and died in the trenches of the First World War.

Our guest is David Grann, a staff writer at The New Yorker Magazine. He's well-known as the bestselling author of "The Lost City of Z," "Killers of the Flower Moon," "The Old Man and the Gun," and other books. He joins us to discuss his newest work of nonfiction, "The White Darkness," which profiles one Henry Worsley, a family man and decorated British special forces officer who also happened to be obsessed with Ernest Shackleton, the 19th-century polar explorer. In 2008, Worsley set out across Antarctica in order to retrace Shackleton's famed expedition....

On this installment of ST, we speak by phone with Charlie Hunter, who's been a prolific and genre-crossing jazz, funk, and fusion guitarist since he came to prominence in the 1990s. Hunter is known for playing a modified guitar, which he tells us about, and with which he plays chords, melodies, and bass parts all at once. He'll be playing here in Tulsa on Saturday night, the 10th, at Duet Jazz (the great new jazz club in downtown Tulsa, located in the Archer Building basement).

Photo by Piper Prolago / The TU Collegian

Our guest is Gary Schyman, an award-winning composer of film, TV, and video game music -- including the "Bioshock" series of video games and the more recent "Torn" virtual reality game. Schyman is currently visiting the TU campus, working with film scoring and computer gaming students. He tells us about how his career began in the television scoring industry, working on classic 1980s shows like "Magnum P.I." and "The A-Team." He also speaks about his far-ranging experiences scoring films and video games, working with various studios and orchestras.

(Note: This show originally aired back in July.) Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Mike Scardino, whose debut memoir is "Bad Call: A Summer Job on a New York Ambulance." The book details his experiences working an ambulance job in Queens, New York, in the late '60s and early '70s. As per a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "Fresh and powerful...Scardino looks back on his summers during college...when he worked as a New York City hospital ambulance attendant.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we're pleased to present another installment in our twice-monthly Museum Confidential podcast series (which is co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum and Scott Gregory of Public Radio Tulsa). This time around, MC chats with Bob Dylan Archive curator Michael Chaiken, who's based in both Brooklyn and Tulsa. He tells us how they're pretty much trying NOT to make a museum with the forthcoming Bob Dylan Center (to open in downtown Tulsa in 2021). At least, not a "museum" in the traditional sense of the term.

On this broadcast of ST, we learn about "Elements," a newly-opened exhibition of paintings by Ying Li, who studied art (and later taught) at Anhui Teachers University in China, and who is now the Phyllisa Koshland Professor of Fine Arts (and chair of the Department of Fine Arts) at Haverford College in Pennsylvania. Li is our guest today. Her engaging work, which often seems both representational and abstract at the same time, usually depicts muted scenes of nature or urban landscapes.

On this edition of ST, we continue our series of interviews with the major candidates currently running for Oklahoma Governor. Our guest today is Chris Powell, the Libertarian candidate. (Please note that we've repeatedly tried to email and telephone Republican Kevin Stitt in order to set up such an interview; no one from the Stitt campaign has gotten back to us.) As Chris Powell states on his campaign website: "I grew up in Choctaw as the youngest of five children. My father was a truck driver and my mother a bookkeeper.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, with Election Day one week away, we begin a series of interviews with the major candidates currently running for governor. Our guest today is Drew Edmondson, the Democratic candidate, who previously served as Oklahoma's Attorney General for 16 years. As noted at the Edmondson campaign website: "Upon graduation from college, Drew enlisted in the United States Navy, where he reached the rank of Petty Officer Second Class and served a tour of duty in Vietnam.

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