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Discussing statewide efforts to advocate for and actively support children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities

logo for ST show airing on 11-19-21
Aired on Friday, November 19th.

Our two guests, both based in OKC, are noted experts: Wanda Felty is with OU's Center for Learning and Leadership, and RoseAnn Duplan is with the Oklahoma Disability Law Center.

On today's StudioTulsa, a discussion of our state's waiting list for waivers for Oklahomans with intellectual and developmental disabilities — and more broadly, of our state's alarmingly inadequate ability to help some of its most vulnerable citizens. There are now well over 5,000 Oklahomans on the waiting list for community-based services, including adults and children seeking in-home services. Of this number, more than 65 percent have been on the waiting list for 7+ years...and around 700 individuals have been on the list awaiting state support for 13+ years. How did Oklahoma reach this appalling state of affairs? And does it have to be this way? And if so, why, and for how long? Our two guests, both based in OKC, are noted experts on efforts to both advocate for and actively support people with disabilities: Wanda Felty is the Community Leadership and Advocacy Coordinator at OU's Center for Learning and Leadership, and RoseAnn Duplan is the Policy and Planning Specialist at the Oklahoma Disability Law Center. Both Wanda and RoseAnn are also the parents of disabled children.

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