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StudioTulsa

From Author Jed Rubenfeld Comes a Thrilling New Historical Novel Called "The Death Instinct" (Encore presentation.)

By Rich Fisher

http://stream.publicbroadcasting.net/production/mp3/kwgs/local-kwgs-972168.mp3

Tulsa, Oklahoma – (Please note: This program originally aired earlier this year.) It's little-remembered in our history books --- yet it's true. In September of 1920, the vast financial palaces of lower Manhattan --- the very castles of Wall Street --- were rocked to the core by what was then the largest and deadliest terrorist attack ever to occur in America. Some 400 people were killed or injured. And the attack, incredibly, remains unsolved to this day. Such is the background for Jed Rubenfeld's exciting, hard-to-put-down new historical thriller, "The Death Instinct." Rubenfeld is our guest on today's StudioTulsa. As he explains, this book --- though not quite a sequel --- does grow out of his previous novel from a few years ago, the bestselling "Interpretation of Murder." The following "starred review" of Rubenfeld's latest novel ran in the pages of Publishers Weekly: "The 1920 bombing of Wall Street, the most deadly act of terrorism in the United States until the Oklahoma blast of 1995, provides the framework for Rubenfeld's excellent follow-up to 'The Interpretation of Murder.' The sweeping plot details the baffling hunt for those responsible for the death and injury of more than 400 New Yorkers. Numerous intriguing subplots snake out from the main story line, several of which bring such historical figures as Marie Curie, famous for her radium experiments, and Sigmund Freud, who had a significant role in the previous book, to life. Rubenfeld deftly wends his way through the shifting landscape with a historian's factual touch and a storyteller's eye for the dramatic and telling. Readers will be enthralled as Dr. Stratham Younger, the hero of 'The Interpretation of Murder' --- aided by his beautiful fianc , scientist Colette Rousseau, and Det. James Littlemore --- manages to solve the Wall Street bombing, something that the real authorities never did."