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"Telling Stories on the Colonial American Frontier"

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Aired on Tuesday, April 3rd.

On today's show, we speak with Joshua Piker, an associate professor of history at the University of Oklahoma. Prof. Piker will give the 2012 Cadenhead-Settle Memorial Lecture, which is presented annually by the TU Department of History, on Thursday of this week (the 5th) at 6pm at the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa. His lecture is entitled, "The Four Deaths of Acorn Whistler: Telling Stories on the Colonial American Frontier," and it's based on a book that Prof. Piker is just now completing. This book is a "Rashomon"-like exploration of authenticity, accuracy, and accountability --- in other words, the sometimes hard-to-find crossroads of truth and historical narrative --- as they relate to the 1752 murder of an Indian headman. Prof. Pike's earlier book is "Okfuskee:  A Creek Indian Town in Colonial America," which examines the peculiar connection between Okfuskee, a Creek village, and the North American British colonies. You can learn more about his upcoming lecture at Gilcrease here.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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