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"How I Shed My Skin: Unlearning the Racist Lessons of a Southern Childhood" (Encore Presentation)

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Aired on Thursday, August 27th.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we listen back to show that first aired in May. At that time, we spoke with the well-regarded Atlanta-based author, Jim Grimsley, who is best known for his novels "Winter Birds," "Dream Boy," and "My Drowning." We chatted with Grimsley about his latest book, a memoir called "How I Shed My Skin: Unlearning the Racist Lessons of a Southern Childhood." As was noted of this account of the author's rural 1960s North Carolina childhood, per a book critic for The Charlotte Observer: "Excellent.... Layer by layer, young Grimsley sheds his deepest beliefs, prime among them that white skin bestows superiority.... A must-read book." And further, per Bookreporter.com: "Grimsley has a powerful tale to tell, about change and the fears and triumphs that go with it.... Despite the continued crossfire, [the author] and his classmates...desegregated the schools of Jones County and became instruments of its history." You can read more about this interview -- and can access a free, on-demand audio stream of it -- at this link.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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