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"The Grand Canyon, Monument to an Ancient Earth"

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Aired on Wednesday, December 14th.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr. Ken Wolgemuth, an adjunct professor in the Dept. of Geosciences at the University of Tulsa who also works as a petroleum consultant. Dr. Wolgemuth is a devout Christian, as he tells us today, yet he's also very much a man of science. He's also one of the contributors to a new geology text that focuses attention on an ongoing debate within America's evangelical and conservative Christian communities, the age of the earth.

"The Grand Canyon, Monument to an Ancient Earth: Can Noah’s Flood Explain the Grand Canyon?" is written to engage those who believe in a young earth philosophy, and believe that the Biblical related story of Noah's flood explains the creation of the Grand Canyon. The book is a visually stunning scientific inquiry into the idea of flood geology, and demonstrates why the geologic, paleontologic, and biologic records categorically repudiate the idea of a young earth, in a way that sheds light on the incredible geology and scenery of the canyonlands.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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