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"No Word for Wilderness: Italy's Grizzlies and the Race to Save the Rarest Bears on Earth"

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Aired on Wednesday, May 30th.

Our guest is Roger Thompson, a Tulsa native and nonfiction writer who also directs the Program in Writing and Rhetoric at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Formerly, Thompson was a wilderness canoe guide in Minnesota; later on, he founded an environmental program in Banff, Alberta, Canada. His newest book, which he told us about recently while visiting Tulsa, grew directly out his longtime appreciation of outdoor exploration. That book is "No Word for Wilderness: Italy's Grizzlies and the Race to Save the Rarest Bears on Earth." Carefully researched and engagingly written, the book profiles two different populations of bears in Italy: one being the last survivors of a bygone era, and the other being an experiment in "re-wilding." For those who love great nature writing as well as those who are concerned about the world's endangered species, this surprising book has much to offer.

Rich Fisher passed through KWGS about thirty years ago, and just never left. Today, he is the general manager of Public Radio Tulsa, and the host of KWGS’s public affairs program, StudioTulsa, which celebrated its twentieth anniversary in August 2012 . As host of StudioTulsa, Rich has conducted roughly four thousand long-form interviews with local, national, and international figures in the arts, humanities, sciences, and government. Very few interviews have gone smoothly. Despite this, he has been honored for his work by several organizations including the Governor's Arts Award for Media by the State Arts Council, a Harwelden Award from the Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, and was named one of the “99 Great Things About Oklahoma” in 2000 by Oklahoma Today magazine.
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