1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission

Chris Polansky / KWGS News

The researchers conducting a test excavation at Tulsa's Oaklawn Cemetery, in search of a possible mass grave containing victims of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, have concluded that such a grave does not exist in the exact spot they investigated.

Facebook / City of Tulsa Gov

A team of archaelogists has resumed excavation work at Oaklawn Cemetery in a search for potential mass graves from the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

"Why did it take 99 years?" Mayor G.T. Bynum said, repeating a reporter's question at a press conference Monday. "I think, first, there was a concerted cover-up of this that involved city leaders and business leaders in this community."

Bynum said he couldn't speak for those in power before him.

Oklahoma Archaeological Survey

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Tulsa will resume test excavations of potential unmarked graves from the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre after the effort was halted in March because of the coronavirus outbreak, city officials announced.

University of Tulsa

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission hosted a virtual commemoration Sunday of the 99th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre.

On June 1, 1921, a white mob continued looting and burning Black Wall Street. The attack destroyed 35 city blocks, and the death toll is still unknown.

They were joined by Damon Lindelof, creator of the HBO series "Watchmen," which opens with the race massacre. As the character Will Reeves says, Lindelof said wounds need air.

Instagram / @TulsaTriumphs2021

A free webinar series beginning Wednesday aims to help Oklahoma teachers craft curricula and lesson plans for effectively teaching the history of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

Dr. Karlos Hill, chair of the Clara Luper Department of African and African American Studies at the University of Oklahoma and the head of the Tulsa Race Massacre Institute, said that while the pandemic dashed plans for a third-annual, in-person program in Tulsa's Greenwood District, the limitation of moving programming online may also be an opportunity.

Courtesy

A history center being built by the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission has a new home.

After talks to build the Greenwood Rising History Center on the grounds of the Greenwood Cultural Center fell through earlier this month, the Centennial Commission announced Tuesday it will now go up on the southeast corner of Greenwood Avenue and Archer Street, the gateway to the Greenwood District.