abortion

Center for Reproductive Rights

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A coalition of abortion rights advocates, clinics and advocacy groups filed a lawsuit Thursday seeking to block recent Oklahoma anti-abortion legislation from taking effect.

The lawsuit filed in a state district court in Oklahoma City aims to block legislation that Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt signed into law in April and that is due to take effect Nov. 1.

A law in Texas banning abortion after about six weeks of pregnancy went into effect today after a federal appeals court cancelled a hearing, and the U.S. Supreme Court failed to act on an emergency petition.

 

Tamya Cox-Touré is the executive director of Oklahoma’s American Civil Liberties Union branch and co-chair of Oklahoma Call for Reproductive Justice. She said what’s historically been different in Oklahoma is that anti-abortion laws here have been struck down at the state level.

 

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Gov. Kevin Stitt signed into law Monday three bills aimed at banning abortion in Oklahoma.

The Oklahoma Senate sent several new abortion restrictions to the governor on Tuesday.

The Oklahoma Democratic Party is demanding an apology from and censure of Rep. Jim Olsen (R-Roland) after comments he made Wednesday as a committee considered his abortion restrictions bill.

"The cavalier usage of racist terms with no repercussions is exhausting. I would be grateful if those who are elected to represent Oklahoma remember that they represent all of Oklahoma, even those of us who are Black and brown," said Oklahoma Democratic Party Chair Alicia Andrews.

Oklahoma lawmakers’ relentless push for new abortion restrictions continued on Wednesday.

Three bills made it out of committee, putting them all a floor vote away from the governor’s desk.

Roe Fund / Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice

The Roe Fund, an arm of the Oklahoma Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice, is a Tulsa-based nonprofit that provides direct financial assistance to Oklahomans seeking abortions. Board member Kurt Gwartney spoke with Public Radio Tulsa's Chris Polansky about what they do, the state of reproductive rights in Oklahoma, and how those intersect.

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PUBLIC RADIO TULSA: I was hoping you could start by just giving us a sort of overview of the Roe Fund and what it is you do.

Matt Trotter / KWGS

Tuesday it was the state House, Wednesday it was the Senate passing a slate of bills to effectively ban abortion in Oklahoma.

Serge Melki

Republican state lawmakers on Tuesday continued their attempts to implement sweeping new restrictions on abortion.

House Bill 1102 would add providing an abortion to a list of "unprofessional conduct" for doctors and require their license be suspended for at least one year. The bill allows an exception for abortions to save a mother’s life or prevent "irreversible physical impairment."

Updated March 3, 12 p.m.  

Oklahoma House Republicans passed a bill on Tuesday to add another layer of abortion restrictions in the state.

House Bill 1904 would add a requirement that providers be board-certified in obstetrics and gynecology. State law currently requires providers be licensed physicians.

The author, Rep. Cynthia Roe (R-Lindsay), was candid in debate.

Matt Trotter / KWGS

Further limiting access to abortion appears to be a top priority among Oklahoma Republican lawmakers.

Six out of 16 bills considered by the Senate Health and Human Services Committee during its first meeting Wednesday sought to make abortions harder to get. Senate President Pro Tem Greg Treat reintroduced Senate Bill 918, which would install into state law triggers for the repeal of virtually all of Oklahoma’s abortion regulations.

(Note: This discussion first aired back in June.) What happens when a woman seeking an abortion in the U.S. is turned away? Our guest is Diana Greene Foster, PhD, who set out to answer this question as definitively as possible.

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OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Unborn children are included in the definition of a “child” for purposes of prosecuting child neglect cases, an Oklahoma appeals court ruled on Thursday.

The Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals overturned a lower court ruling in a case involving Kearline Datara Anderson of Rogers County who was charged with child neglect after state prosecutors alleged she used illegal drugs while she was pregnant.

What happens when a woman seeking an abortion in the U.S. is turned away? Our guest is Diana Greene Foster, PhD, who set out to answer this question as definitively as possible.

A bill sent to the governor by the Oklahoma House on Friday will let parents and grandparents bring wrongful death suits against doctors who perform abortions.

Senate Bill 1728’s House Author, Inola Republican Rep. Tom Gann, believes abortion is a multimillion-dollar a year industry in which doctors coerce women into having the procedure up to 70% of the time.

"In 2014, the statistic I have right now is that the average abortion cost is $550. That’s all they want," Gann said.

Whitney Bryen-Oklahoma Watch

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt’s attempt to ban abortions during the coronavirus pandemic cannot be enforced, a federal judge has ruled.

U.S. District Judge Charles Goodwin issued a preliminary injunction late Monday after abortion providers sued Stitt over the ban. The injunction replaces a temporary restraining order that the same judge issued last week that allowed most abortions to continue.

U.S. Courts

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A federal appeals court on Monday upheld a lower-court order that overturned the Oklahoma governor’s ban on abortions during the coronavirus outbreak emergency.

Office of Attorney General

Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter has appealed a federal judge’s ruling that allows abortions to continue during the state’s COVID-19 health emergency.

Hunter has asked the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit to stay the lower court’s temporary restraining order. Gov. Kevin Stitt included medication and surgical abortions in his executive order delaying minor medical procedures.

U.S. District Judge Charles Goodwin ruled Monday Stitt’s order imposed requirements that effectively deny a right of access to abortion.

File photo

A federal judge on Monday blocked Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt’s ban on most abortions in the state during the COVID-19 emergency.

Stitt included surgical and medication abortions in his executive order last month delaying minor procedures in order to preserve personal protective equipment for health care providers.

U.S. District Judge Charles Goodwin ruled Monday Stitt’s order imposed requirements that effectively deny a right of access to abortion.

Whitney Bryen-Oklahoma Watch

Updated March 30, 5:53 p.m.

The Center for Reproductive Rights and Planned Parenthood are Gov. Kevin Stitt’s order that abortions be delayed during the COVID-19 emergency.

The organizations filed a lawsuit Monday in federal court in Oklahoma naming Stitt, State Health Commissioner Gary Cox, State Emergency Manager Mark Gower, Attorney General Mike Hunter and other officials.

Any type of abortion not necessary to save a woman’s life or health must be delayed until April 7 in Oklahoma.

Gov. Kevin Stitt said Friday they are included in his order to postpone some medical procedures in an attempt to save protective equipment for health care providers.

Oklahoma Call for Reproductive Justice board member Gabriela Cano said Stitt's clarification is too broad.

"These medical procedures are done more in clinics than in hospitals, and he did not specify what that would look like to — what type of procedure would be banned," Cano said.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Katie Watson, an award-winning professor who has taught bioethics, medical humanities, and constitutional law for several years at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. She joins us to discuss her smart, well-balanced, and accessible new book, "Scarlet A: The Ethics, Law, and Politics of Ordinary Abortion." Per The Chicago Tribune, it "is a thoughtful and engaging consideration of one of this country's most controversial words: abortion." And further, from Louise P.

On this edition of our show, we listen back to a fine interview that originally aired in May of last year. At that time, our guest was Dr. Rachel Pearson, who told us about her memoir, "No Apparent Distress: A Doctor's Coming-of-Age on the Front Lines of American Medicine." As was noted of this reflective and well-written book by Kirkus Reviews: "[In this book] a sensitive doctor describes her beginnings navigating the unpredictable, woolly world of modern American health care.

(Note: This show originally aired back in January.) On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, we speak with Mark Edwards, the co-founder of Upstream USA, a newly formed nonprofit that aims to, per its website, "change healthcare so that all women receive the highest quality services and can conveniently access the full range of contraceptive methods, including IUDs and the implant.... Upstream USA's mission is to change contraceptive counseling and care in health centers so that clients have easy access to the best contraceptive methods.

On this edition of ST on Health, we speak with Mark Edwards, the co-founder of Upstream USA, a newly formed nonprofit that aims, as noted at its website, "to change healthcare so that all women receive the highest quality services and can conveniently access the full range of contraceptive methods, including IUDs and the implant." Indeed, as stated further at the Upstream USA site: "Fully half of all pregnancies in the United States are accidental.

KWGS News file photo

From pharmacists who refuse to dispense Plan B drugs (which prevent ovulation) to legislation designed to limit a patient's end-of-life or euthanasia options, there's no shortage of controversial topics in America today when it comes to religion/morality overlapping with science/medicine. On this edition of ST, we discuss such a topic as we confront certain practices of some Catholic hospitals.

Oklahoma AG Appeals Judge's Ruling on Abortion Law

Jun 22, 2012
KWGS News File photo

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt has appealed a ruling that struck down a law requiring women seeking abortions to have an ultrasound image placed in front of them and listen to a description of the fetus before the procedure is performed.

Pruitt filed an appeal of Oklahoma County District Judge Bryan Dixon's decision with the Oklahoma Supreme Court Thursday.

Dixon ruled the law is unconstitutional because it addresses only patients, physicians and sonographers who deal with abortions. He rejected Pruitt's request to reconsider his decision.