American Colonial History

On this edition of ST, we speak once again with the historian and bestselling author Nathaniel Philbrick, whose newest book is a fisrt-person hyrid of American history, travel writing, and personal reflection. The book is "Travels with George: In Search of Washington and His Legacy." It retraces four different trips that the newly-elected President Washington took throughout the ex-colonies comprising this country, speaking-engagement tours that our first Chief Exectuive made at a time when the United States of America was still a rather unconnected and quarrelsome political experiment.

(Note: This interview first aired in February of 202.) Very early in her career, the well-regarded American colonial historian Mary Beth Norton came to believe that the critical year in American independence was not 1776, but rather, 1774. Yet her academic focus on women's colonial history sidelined her interest in fleshing out this theory.

National Park Service / Liberty Bell Center (nps.gov)

It's well-known that Americans today -- in so many cases, if not in most cases -- inhabit completely different worlds when it comes to acquiring news and daily information. But do we also have completely different understandings of our country's history? On this edition of ST, we're discussing the official report of the "1776 Commission." This report was released by the Trump Administration on Monday of this week...and then removed from the White House website two days later by the newly-incumbent Biden Administration.

Our guest is Jared Yates Sexton, whose writing has included books and articles on politics, culture, and social justice, as well as works of fiction; he's an associate professor of creative writing at Georgia Southern University. He joins us to discuss his new book, which argues that the idea of "American exceptionalism" is not only false -- but it's been false since the country was founded.

Our guest is TU's Phi Beta Kappa Carl F. Cranor Visiting Scholar, Corey Brettschneider. He joins us to talk about his recent book, "The Oath and the Office." This book will form the basis for his upcoming, free-to-the-public Phi Beta Kappa lecture, which Brettschneider will give online this evening (the 17th) at 5pm.

(Note: This interview first aired back in February.) Very early in her career, the well-regarded American colonial historian Mary Beth Norton came to believe that the critical year in American independence was not 1776, but rather, 1774. Yet her academic focus on women's colonial history sidelined her interest in fleshing out this theory.

Very early in her career, American colonial historian Mary Beth Norton came to believe that the critical year in American independence was not 1776, but the year, 1774. But her academic focus on women's colonial history, sidelined her interest in fleshing out this theory.