Art Criticism

Many people have been incorrectly praised as a "Renaissance Man," but the phrase perfectly describes Mr. John Lurie. Music, acting, painting, writing -- Lurie has really done it all. And he's nowhere near finished creating things. With a long-gestating memoir just being published and a second season of HBO's "Painting with John" now in production, the indie legend kindly agreed to join us recently for a wide-ranging chat.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to share Episode 1 of Season 6 of the Museum Confidential podcast, which is a co-production of Philbrook Museum of Art and Public Radio Tulsa. (Season 6 just launched earlier this month.) This episode begins with a few basic yet far-reaching questions. What is an "outsider artist"? And do we even call them that anymore? In recent years, the term has shifted to "self-taught artist." Sounds different, but does it mean the same thing? And what about "folk art" -- when does this term apply? We chat with Dr.

[image via TheArtNewspaper.com]

Welcome to Season 6 of the Museum Confidential podcast, a co-production of Philbrook Museum of Art and Public Radio Tulsa. Our first episode begins with some basic yet far-reaching questions. What is an "outsider artist"? And do we even call them that anymore? In recent years, the term has shifted to "self-taught artist." Sounds different, but does it mean the same thing? And what about "folk art" -- when does this term apply? We're pleased to chat with Dr. Katherine Jentleson, the Merrie and Dan Boone Curator of Folk and Self-Taught Art at the High Museum in Atlanta.

Photo via Corian.com

Ever happen to look at a painting on the wall of some hospital and wonder: "Who chose THIS picture? And why is it hanging HERE?" Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the London-based writer Lou Stoppard, who writes about style, trends, and culture for The New Yorker Magazine and other publications.

On this edition of our program, we learn about the 2021 Art 365 program from the nonprofit Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition (OVAC). The artists whose work appears in this very competitive year-long program were chosen by guest curator, Grace Deveney, the associate curator of Prospect.5 in New Orleans. She's our guest today, along with Alexa Goetzinger, the associate director of OVAC. The artists selected for this year's OVAC 365 exhibit are Ginnie Baer (Edmond), Crystal Z.

Serae Avance (American, b. 1993). Knowledge and Struggle, 2021. Digital pigment print. Courtesy of the artist. Copyright Serae Avance.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a show that recently opened at Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. "From the Limitations of Now" will be on view through September 5th.

ARTWORK BY FRED VILLANUEVA (via ahhatulsa.org)

Our guest is the Dallas-based artist Fred Villanueva, whose exhibition titled "The Trayectorias" (or "the trajectory," or "the path") is on view at ahha in downtown Tulsa through February 21st. This show, per the ahha website, "presents past artistic explorations that Villanueva has re-mixed to create new paintings, drawings, and installations.

"The Students Five" by Blackwell, Courtesy Hiromi Katayama & Joe Goode (This photo also appeared in the OU Daily.)

On this edition of ST, we profile a novel and interesting group exhibit now on view at the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art on the OU campus in Norman; "OK/LA" is up through March 7th of 2021. As per the museum's website: "This exhibition features the work of six former Oklahomans who left the state in the late 1950s for Los Angeles: Patrick Blackwell, Joe Goode, Jerry McMillan, Ed Ruscha, Paul Ruscha, and Mason Williams. Blackwell, Goode, McMillan, and Ed Ruscha studied at the Chouinard Art Institute....

"Yankton Sioux, 1837" by Gina Adams. (Hand-cut calico letters on antique quilt.) 91.5”H x 72.5”W, 2014. Posted at [www.ginaadamsartist.com/broken-treaty-quilts].

Our guest on ST is Gina Adams, a contemporary hybrid artist based in Vancouver, British Columbia. She joins us to discuss her striking and ongoing series of Broken Treaty Quilts. A descendant of both Indigenous Peoples (the Ojibwe tribe) and colonial Americans, Adams re-purposes antique quilts in order to create art works documenting the various treaties broken by the United States with Native American tribes over the years.

Gardiner Gallery of Art at Oklahoma State University / OSU DEPARTMENT OF ART, GRAPHIC DESIGN, AND ART HISTORY

Who actually designed Tulsa's iconic Boston Avenue Methodist Church, that widely celebrated art deco structure within the city's skyline which was completed in 1929? Many architecture experts will tell you it was the well-known Tulsa architect Bruce Goff...but was it? Our guest on ST is Teresa Holder, the manager of the Gardiner Gallery at OSU in Stillwater.

Our guest is Christina Burke, the Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. She tells us about an exciting new show at the museum, "Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists," which is now on view for members only -- and which will open to the public on Wednesday the 7th. As noted the Philbrook website: "Women have long been the creative force behind Native art.

Photo by Melissa Lukenbaugh

Update:  Statement from the University of Tulsa School of Art, Design, and Art History

The gallery is open to TU Students, Faculty, and Staff Only and is Not Open to the Public.

While we are not open to the public, please join us Thursdays in September at the University of Tulsa School of Art, Design, and Art History Facebook and Instagram pages for special virtual programs and highlights.  

On this installment of ST, we share a Museum Confidential podcast from our archives that feels especially timely, given what's going these days across the nation and, indeed, all over the world. The podcast episode is from the fall of 2018, when we spoke with Dr. David Pilgrim, founder and curator of the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia at Ferris State University in Michigan. This museum was born out of his personal collection, one that began decades ago, when Dr. Pilgrim was growing up in Alabama. Also on our program, commentator Mark Darrah offers "The Next Bus to Nome."

On this edition of ST, we present another installment in our Museum Confidential podcast series, which is a popular co-production of Public Radio Tulsa and Philbrook Museum of Art. This time out, MC speaks with longtime NYC-museum veteran Christine Coulson, who worked at The Met for a quarter of a century in a variety of roles. She left a couple of years ago to write full-time, and now comes her widely acclaimed and rather experimental debut novel: "Metropolitan Stories."

Our guest is the well-known, New York-based graphic artist, Luba Lukova. Her bold, accessible images have appeared in The New York Times, Time, and other leading publications, and her prints and posters are also in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Denver Art Museum, and the Library of Congress. She is currently a J. Donald Feagin Visiting Artist here at TU, and an exhibit of her socially-aware work, "Luba Lukova: Designing Justice," will soon go on view at the Henry Zarrow Center for Art & Education in downtown Tulsa.

Our guest is Bridget Quinn, a writer, art history scholar, and educator based in San Francisco. She joins us to discuss her 2017 book, "Broad Strokes: 15 Women Who Made Art and Made History." Quinn will deliver a sold-out "Women Who Changed Art" lecture tonight (Friday the 28th) at Philbrook Museum -- and that lecture will be based, in large part, on this book.

The nonprofit Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition, or OVAC, which began in 1988, actively supports visual artists living and working throughout Oklahoma. On this edition of ST, we learn about a new OVAC show on view at ahha Tulsa -- it's a triennial exhibition called Concept, and it will be on display through March 22nd. Our guests are Sarah Ahmad, and artist whose work appears in this show, and Krystle Brewer, the executive director of OVAC.

On this edition of ST, we present another installment in our ongoing Museum Confidential podcast series, which is created twice a month by our own Scott Gregory and Philbrook Museum's Jeff Martin.

Edward Hopper Was Here

Nov 22, 2019

The name "Edward Hopper" is almost synonymous with loneliness. Hotels and motels play a central role in Hopper’s art. EDWARD HOPPER AND THE AMERICAN HOTEL recently opened at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond. It's the first in-depth look at this side of Hopper’s work and features a recreated room based on Hopper’s “Western Motel.” The space serves as a fully functional hotel room. On this episode of MC, we chat with the show’s curator, Dr. Leo Mazow.

Our program today explores the work of Jave Yoshimoto, a visual artist and educator born in Japan to Chinese parents who immigrated to California at a young age. A recent Tulsa Artist Fellowship alum as well as a recipient of a Joan Mitchell Foundation Painter's and Sculptor's grant, Yoshimoto now has a show at the Living Arts of Tulsa gallery, which he tells us about.

Photo by Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936.

On this installment of ST, we learn about a new photography show at Gilcrease dedicated to the work of Dorothea Lange (1895-1965) and her peers. (The exhibit is on view through January 5, 2020.) Per the Gilcrease website, Lange's "empathetic images documented the toll that the Depression took on the nation. The evidence was seen in the long lines of desperate, jobless men, migrant workers searching for work, and impoverished families living in squalid conditions.

On this edition of ST, we hear about an Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition (or OVAC) program that supports young professionals interested in a career as a curator, an art critic, an arts-based journalist, or the like. Through its Oklahoma Art Writing & Curatorial Fellowsship, OVAC has helped several individuals hone their writing and/or curatorial skills, which has culminated in a special "Curatorial Lab" series of exhibits happening at the Henry Zarrow Center for Art & Education in downtown Tulsa.

Our guest is Susan Green, a curator at Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. She's the local curator for a traveling show now at Philbrook's main campus -- "Wondrous Worlds: Art & Islam Through Time & Place" will be on view through October 6th. Per the Philbrook website, it is "the most extensive exhibition of Islamic art to be shown in Oklahoma, [and it] represents over 1,200 years of rich artistic creation, illustrating the great geographic expanse of the Islamic world.

Our guests on this edition of ST are Laura Fry, Senior Curator of the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa, and Carolyn Sickles, Executive Dirtector of the Tulsa Artist Fellowship. These two outstanding, arts-based organizations are now jointly offering "Recall/Respond," a contemporary arts exhibition that presents work by current Tulsa Artist Fellows as well as TAF alumni.

StudioTulsa today offers another edition of the popular Museum Confidential podcast, which is co-created twice a month by our own Scott Gregory with Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum of Art. Recently, Scott and Jeff trekked down to the Big Easy to offer a "live & onstage" presentation of Museum Confidential as part of the American Alliance of Museums (AAM) annual meeting. Their guest was Don Wildman, host of the long-running Travel Channel show, "Mysteries at the Museum."

StudioTulsa today offers another installment in the ongoing Museum Confidential podcast series, which is a popular collaboration between Public Radio Tulsa and Philbrook Museum of Art. This particular podcast -- taped before a "live" audience back in January -- explores what it actually means to be a curator with Philbrook Museum of Art Chief Curator Catherine Whitney and Gilcrease Museum Senior Curator Laura Fry. Also featuring special cameos by comedian Pete Holmes, "exit" signs, and the National Mustard Museum....

There are countless examples of writers using paintings or other visual art as inspiration to create entirely new work. Think "Girl with a Pearl Earring," "The Da Vinci Code," or even "Ode on a Grecian Urn" by John Keats. This is what the award-winning writer Donna Baier Stein did when she decided to write a new collection of short stories based on lithographs by iconic American artist Thomas Hart Benton. The issues that Benton dealt with and depicted throughout the Great Depression and afterward still resonate today.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we offer another episode of our twice-monthly Museum Confidential podcast (which is co-created by Jeff Martin with Philbrook Museum of Art and our own Scott Gregory). This time out, MC speaks with Graham Boettcher, Director of the Birmingham Museum of Art in Birmingham, Alabama. Boettcher has recently been looking at that museum's troubling Jim Crow-era policies, which occurred in the first dozen years of its existence.

Laid Time Table with Cycads (detail) by Beth Lipman

On this edition of ST, we speak with the noted contemporary artist, Beth Lipman, who is known for her intricate and even breathtaking glass work. Her show, "Beth Lipman: Accidental Vestiges," opens today (the 5th) at 108 Contemporary as part of the First Friday Art Crawl in downtown Tulsa. An artist who employs a craft-making process -- and a great deal of glass -- in order to emulate or evoke such traditional "still life" subjects as food, books, and table arrangements, Lipman uses crystal materials in new and thoughtful ways.

THE FIELD MUSEUM (CHICAGO)

On this edition of ST, we offer another installment in our ongoing, twice-monthly Museum Confidential podcast series. Question: What is a museums supposed to do when it has WAY too much stuff? Whereas you yourself might take a few carloads of personal surplus to Goodwill, or maybe just set up a yard sale, museums don't have that luxury. Sometimes they end up building costly expansions just to contain the overflow.

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