Art History

There are countless examples of writers using paintings or other visual art as inspiration to create entirely new work. Think "Girl with a Pearl Earring," "The Da Vinci Code," or even "Ode on a Grecian Urn" by John Keats. This is what the award-winning writer Donna Baier Stein did when she decided to write a new collection of short stories based on lithographs by iconic American artist Thomas Hart Benton. The issues that Benton dealt with and depicted throughout the Great Depression and afterward still resonate today.

Laid Time Table with Cycads (detail) by Beth Lipman

On this edition of ST, we speak with the noted contemporary artist, Beth Lipman, who is known for her intricate and even breathtaking glass work. Her show, "Beth Lipman: Accidental Vestiges," opens today (the 5th) at 108 Contemporary as part of the First Friday Art Crawl in downtown Tulsa. An artist who employs a craft-making process -- and a great deal of glass -- in order to emulate or evoke such traditional "still life" subjects as food, books, and table arrangements, Lipman uses crystal materials in new and thoughtful ways.

THE FIELD MUSEUM (CHICAGO)

On this edition of ST, we offer another installment in our ongoing, twice-monthly Museum Confidential podcast series. Question: What is a museums supposed to do when it has WAY too much stuff? Whereas you yourself might take a few carloads of personal surplus to Goodwill, or maybe just set up a yard sale, museums don't have that luxury. Sometimes they end up building costly expansions just to contain the overflow.

On this edition of ST, we present another installment in our twice-monthly Museum Confidential podcast series, which is co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum and our own Scott Gregory. This time around, MC is exploring art conservation. It's sort like of a magic trick. But when you look closer, art conservation isn't magical at all -- it's careful, delicate, methodical wortk. And it's about very talented people using skills and techniques passed down over generations alongside cutting-edge technology.

"The key to the work up to this point" by Hilma af Klint (1907)

On this episode of ST, we offer another Museum Confidential podcast. (The podcast, now in its second season, is co-created twice a month by our own Scott Gregory and Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum.) This time out, MC learns about a special, much-discussed exhibition now on view at the Guggenheim Museum in New York. It's a remarkable series of works by the obscure yet visionary Swedish artist Hilma af Klint (1862-1944). The exhibit is titled "Paintings for the Future" and closes April 23rd.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we chat with artist Joel Daniel Phillips, who is currently a Tulsa Artist Fellow. A California native, he tells us about his new show, "It Felt Like the Future Was Now," which is on view at Philbrook Downtown through May 19th. Per the Philbrook Downtown website: "Phillips chooses images charged with history. The labor, both physical and emotional, needed to create his graphite drawings is part of what draws the viewer into the work.

Our guest is Catherine Whitney, the Chief Curator and Curator of American Art at Philbrook Musuem of Art here in Tulsa. She tells us about a just-opened, far-reaching exhibit at Philbrook, curated by herself, called "Making Modern America." Featuring 60+ paintings, photographs, design objects, and prints -- and on view through May 26th -- this show explores how U.S. artists working from 1910 to 1960 depicted the dramatic social and environmental changes of this pivotal era.

On this edition of ST, an in-depth chat with Scott Hurst, a longtime artist on the Tulsa scene who will soon present a new exhibition of his work at the Liggett Studio in downtown Tulsa (at 314 So. Kenosha). "Playtime > Discoveries" will feature paintings, collages, and prints that Hurst has created over the past 30 years or so -- many (but not all) of them in the abstract mode. The show opens on Friday the 8th and runs through March 2nd; more info is posted at LiggettStudio.com.

On this edition of ST, we offer another Museum Confidential podcast (which is a podcast co-created twice monthly by our own Scott Gregory and Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum). This time around, Museum Confidential speaks with author Mary Gabriel about her new and much-praised group biography, which digs deeply into the post-WII New York art world.

PHOTO BY LAUREN SILBERMAN

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we offer another edition of our ongoing Museum Confidential podcast, which is co-created twice monthly by Public Radio Tulsa and Philbrook Museum of Art. This time around, MC visits California's High Desert with its roving correspondent, Preston Poe (of The Preston Poe Show podcast). As we often say, there are many kinds of museums.... One of them is a tiny, refurbished photo-processing booth located in Joshua Tree, which is now dedicated entirely to crochet.

Photo by Steve Clem

The Sand Springs Cultural & Historical Museum is presenting the artwork of the late Louisiana Cajun painter, George Rodrigue. Rodrigue is best known for his "blue dog" paintings, which he created over the last two decades of his life, but throughout his career, he painted numerous images depicting the people and places of his south Louisiana home. 

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we get to know Ricco Wright, who owns and operates the nonprofit Black Wall Street Gallery, a recently created art space on Greenwood Avenue. After Wright graduated from Union High School, he studied mathematics as a Bill Gates Scholar at Langston University. Thereafter he earned a doctorate in math at Columbia University, after which he lived and worked in New York City for a decade. As Wright tells us, his own passion for the arts -- visual, musical, verbal, and otherwise -- flourished considerably while he was based in NYC.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, our guest is pioneering conceptual artist Mel Bochner. Since his groundbreaking 1966 work, "Working Drawings," which featured photocopied working drawings, bills, and ephemera of his artist friends, Bochner has explored painting and language, and asked viewers to think about both in new ways. He's best known for his thesaurus works, several of which are in the new exhibit at Philbrook, "Amazing! Mel Bochner Prints from the Collections of Jordan Schnitzer and His Family Foundation."

On this installment of ST, we learn about a remarkable and newly launched exhibit at Gilcrease, "Americans All!" This show, which is ongoing, is (per the Gilcrease website) the museum's "latest exhibition drawn from [its] permanent collection...[and it] showcases the many positive contributions immigrants have made, and continue to make, to American life and culture.

On this edition of our show, we chat with Emily Zilber. A former curator at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and currently the editor of Metalsmith magazine, Zilber is now in Tulsa to serve as the curator for VisionMakers 2018 at 108 Contemporary. This show, which is the gallery's juried biennial exhibition, features the work of contemporary craft-based artists from a multi-state region, all of whom combine cutting-edge concepts with traditional skills in order to push the boundaries of art, craft, and design.

Photo by Blake Little; "Bareback Bronc Riding, San Diego, California, 1992."

On this edition of ST, we learn about a photography show at Gilcrease that aims to capture the grit, determination, diversity, community, and "American-ness" of the national gay rodeo circuit; "Blake Little: Photographs from the Gay Rodeo" is on view at the museum through November 25th. The striking black-and-white photographs in this show (more than 40 of them in total) were all taken by Blake Little between 1988 and 1992.

T. C. Cannon (1946–1978, Caddo/Kiowa), Small Catcher, 1973–78. Oil on canvas. Collection of Gil Waldman and Christy Vezolles. © 2018 Estate of T. C. Cannon. Courtesy of the Heard Museum, Phoenix, Arizona. Photo by Craig Smith.

We learn about a striking show on view at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa; "T.C. Cannon: At the Edge of America" will run through October 7th of this year. It is, per the Gilcrease website, "the first major traveling exhibition of Cannon's work since 1990 and explores the dynamic creative range and legacy of an artist whose life was cut short at age 31.

On this edition of ST, we learn about a striking new show on view at Philbrook, "Innovative Impressions," which will run through September 9th. Per the Philbrook website, this exhibit "explores an under-studied aspect of three Impressionists' careers: their groundbreaking prints and the techniques they developed through collaboration and experimentation. The artists of the Impressionist group are known for their innovative painting methods.

Our guest is Allen Gannett, the founder and CEO of TrackMaven, a software analytics firm whose clients have included Microsoft, Marriott, Home Depot, Aetna, and Honda.

On this edition of ST, with the long-running,multifaceted, and decidedly unorthodox "Museum Confidential" exhibit about to close (on Sunday the 6th) at Philbrook Museum of Art, we present another installment in the Museum Confidential Podcast series. Co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook and our own Scott Gregory, this podcast has been posting twice-monthly since the exhibition opened at the museum back in October.

On this edition of ST, we present another installment in the bi-weekly Museum Confidential podcast series, which is co-created by Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum of Art and our own Scott Gregory. This particular podcast explores the Rothko Chapel, established in 1971 in Houston, Texas. It's both a sacred space and a modern art mainstay. Dedicated to non-denominational prayer and private contemplation -- and also to international peace and fellowship -- the building routinely hosts lectures, concerts, interfaith gatherings, and similar events.