StudioTulsa

Arts & Culture of interest to Northeastern Oklahoma

On this edition of ST, we welcome back to the show Prof. David Shambaugh of George Washington University. He recently gave an address at the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (or TCFR) titled "Where Great Powers Meet: America and China in Southeast Asia." An internationally recognized authority and award-winning author on contemporary China and the global relations of Asia, Shambaugh has visited or lived in China every year since 1979 and has traveled extensively throughout Asia, Europe, and Latin America.

"The Outsiders" -- both the well-known coming-of-age novel by S.E. Hinton and the likewise-titled 1983 film by Francis Ford Coppola -- certainly looms large in the cultural history of this community. On today's edition of StudioTulsa, we meet the California-based, Oklahoma-born grade school librarian who, back in 1980, encouraged her students to create a petition asking Coppola to make the film. Yes, this is really how "The Outsiders" got on the path from beloved young-adult book to cult-classic movie. That librarian is Jo Ellen Misakian.

Police officers in the U.S. are nine times more likely to kill African-American men than they are any other group of citizens. A tragic statistic, to be sure, but also -- given so many recent events -- a statistic that many won't find very surprising. How police forces across the nation relate to matters of racism, civil rights, and race relations are now coming under close scrutiny. But what about the role of the courts in this issue?

Our guest is Joseph Arndt, who's been the music director at Saint John's Episcopal Church here in Tulsa since 2015. Arndt received his M.M. from The Juilliard School and his B.M. from Westminster Choir College in organ performance. Shortly after arriving in Tulsa, he founded the popular Music at Midday series at Saint John's, which he tells us about. The 7th season of Music at Midday gets underway tomorrow (Wednesday the 22nd, at noon) with a performance by Barron Ryan, the Tulsa-based classical/jazz/crossover pianist.

Our guest is the noted medical expert, Dr. Leana Wen, a visiting professor at George Washington University's School of Public Health and a non-resident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. She's also a contributing columnist for The Washington Post and a CNN medical analyst, and she was named one of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to share Episode 1 of Season 6 of the Museum Confidential podcast, which is a co-production of Philbrook Museum of Art and Public Radio Tulsa. (Season 6 just launched earlier this month.) This episode begins with a few basic yet far-reaching questions. What is an "outsider artist"? And do we even call them that anymore? In recent years, the term has shifted to "self-taught artist." Sounds different, but does it mean the same thing? And what about "folk art" -- when does this term apply? We chat with Dr.

We've heard often about "essential workers" since the pandemic got underway -- those indispensable individuals who are, alas, in many cases under-appreciated, under-paid, or both. But such vital workers are not, of course, just those working in the medical, science, health, or rescue fields, and these workers were certainly an important part of American society **before** the pandemic ever hit. Our guest is the New York-based author and journalist Eyal Press.

The pandemic, of course, has clearly changed -- and is actually still changing -- how we think about work, play, relationships, entertainment, education, social interaction, and much more. It's also making many of us wonder about city life, i.e., what the pros and cons of living in an urban setting really are in this age of Covid. Are people still as drawn to cities as they used to be? And what does the future of the city look like? Our guest is David Cutler, the Otto Eckstein Professor of Applied Economics at Harvard University.

On this edition of ST, we welcome writer Connie Cronley back to our program. She's one of our regular commentators; her previous books include "Sometimes a Wheel Falls Off," "Light and Variable," "Poke a Stick at It," and "Mr. Ambassador: Warrior for Peace." Cronley joins us to discuss her latest book, "A Life on Fire," which is a fascinating new biography of Kate Barnard (1875-1930).

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is the progressive radio host, multimedia personality, and bestselling author Thom Hartmann. He tells us about his newest book, "The Hidden History of American Healthcare: Why Sickness Bankrupts You and Makes Others Insanely Rich." It's an engaging and highly readable narrative looking at how and why efforts to enact truly affordable universal healthcare in the U.S. have been repeatedly thwarted...and what might be done in order to finally realize this.

Our guest is Marcello Angelini, the artistic director of Tulsa Ballet. The company will present its annual "Creations in Studio K" program -- which is devoted, as ever, to new works only -- through September 19th; the Studio K space is located at 1212 East 45th Place in Tulsa. This year's rundown includes world premieres from both Yury Yanowsky and Katarzyna Kozielska, as Angelini tells us. Also on the bill is a performance from TBII, which is the second company of Tulsa Ballet. They're offering a world premiere by the award-winning choreographer Stephanie Martinez.

Our guest is Adam Tooze, a professor of history at Columbia University and the author of "Crashed," which was a New York Times Notable Book of 2018 and one of The Economist's Books of the Year. His timely new book, which he tells us about, mixes finance, politics, business, economics, medicine, and recent world history in order to trace what went wrong -- and why -- during the turning-point year that was 2020. This new book is "Shutdown: How Covid Shook the World's Economy." As was noted by Reuters: "Tooze makes a strong case for looking back and beginning to draw some conclusions....

(Note: This interview originally aired back in June.) Our guest is the novelist Jonathan Lee, whose latest book is a vivid, page-turning work of historical fiction titled "The Great Mistake." It's a novel set in 19th-century New York City that digs into the life and times of -- and the mysterious murder of -- a man named Andrew Haswell Green.

(Note: This conversation originally aired earlier this year.) History is one thing; mythology is another. And at times, of course, these two can overlap, or blur, or get confused. Such is the case with the Alamo, as our guest argues. Longtime journalist Chris Tomlinson is a columnist for The Houston Chronicle and The San Antonio Express-News, and he's one of the authors of a book titled "Forget the Alamo: The Rise and Fall of an American Myth." As was noted of this work in Publishers Weekly: "Substantive yet wryly humorous....

Our guest is Dr. Jillian Horton, a medical educator, writer, musician, and podcaster based in Canada. As an award-winning teacher of mindfulness, she works with doctors at all stages of their careers who are dealing with guilt, grief, burnout, frustration, and/or other professional pressures. Dr.

Today we hear from a medical professional whose work is having a profound impact on the wider realms of continuing and professional education. Our guest is the newest Brock Prize in Education Innovation Laureate, Dr. Sanjeev Arora. He's the founder of Project ECHO, an instructional and tele-mentoring model that provides professional development to under-served and/or remote areas. It's a fast-growing program that's making educational change occur at the local, national, and global levels. Dr.

Our guest is the acclaimed African-American artist Lonnie Holley, born in Alabama in 1950, who has three pieces now on view at Philbrook in that museum's "From the Limitations of Now" exhibit, which closes on September 5th. Known for his mixed-media and found-and-discarded-object art pieces, Holley is also an "experimental blues" musician who's made several albums. He will perform with his band tomorrow night (Friday the 3rd) at Philbrook's garden space, beginning at 7pm.

(Note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) Our guest is Shankar Vedantam, the bestselling author and host of the popular "Hidden Brain" podcast and public-radio show. He joins us to discuss his book, "Useful Delusions: The Power and Paradox of the Self-Deceiving Brain." This book takes a detailed, research-driven look at the fundamental role of self-deception in human life -- that is, its positive as well as its negative aspects. As was noted by The Washington Post: "Powerful....

Photo from HBO [via NPR.org]

On this edition of ST, we revisit our interview with John Carreyrou, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter with The Wall Street Journal. In early 2020, we spoke with Carreyrou about "Bad Blood," his book about the bogus Silicon Valley blood-testing start-up known as Theranos...and about the charismatic young CEO of Theranos, Elizabeth Holmes, who at one point seemed to be taking the world by storm a la Mark Zuckerberg or Bill Gates.

Why do human beings sweat? And what other animals on this planet sweat, and why do they do it? Are there health benefits to sweating? Our guest is Sarah Everts, a science writer who has written for Scientific American, Smithsonian, New Scientist, and other publications, and who teaches journalism at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.

Our guest is the poet and fiction writer Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, who teaches creative writing and literature at OU. She joins us to talk about her new book, "The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois," which is a very well-regarded debut novel. As was noted of this work in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "A staggering and ambitious saga exploring African American history.

On this edition of ST, we are discussing the history of the War on Terror -- i.e., the open-ended, multi-directional conflict that the U.S. government enacted some twenty years ago, in the immediate wake of 9/11 -- as well as how this war has moved both American politics and American society in increasingly authoritarian (and even racist) directions. Our guest is Spencer Ackerman, a national-security correspondent who's written for The New Republic, WIRED, The Guardian, and The Daily Beast.

(Note: This interview first aired back in March.) Our guest is Kevin Brockmeier, an imaginative and acclaimed writer based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the Tulsa Higher Education Consortium, which is, per its website, a "multi-institutional collaborative effort to meaningfully improve students' journeys toward degree completion, professional independence, and mobility." Our guest is Dr. Laura Latta, the executive director of the THEC. Seven Tulsa-area higher-education institutions, as Dr.

Photo via Corian.com

Ever happen to look at a painting on the wall of some hospital and wonder: "Who chose THIS picture? And why is it hanging HERE?" Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the London-based writer Lou Stoppard, who writes about style, trends, and culture for The New Yorker Magazine and other publications.

Our guest on ST is Emily Oster, a professor of economics at Brown University whose earlier books include "Expecting Better" and "Cribsheet." She joins us to talk about her new book, "The Family Firm: A Data-Driven Guide to Better Decision Making in the Early School Years." As was noted of this volume by The Washington Post: "A targeted mini-MBA program designed to help moms and dads establish best practices for day-to-day operations....

(Note: This interview first aired back in February.) Our guest is Michelle Commander, an Associate Director and Curator at The Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture, which is a branch of the New York Public Library located in Harlem. The Schomberg Center has put out a pathbreaking new anthology, which she tells us about. The book is "Unsung: Unheralded Narratives of American Slavery and Abolition." It's a well-edited volume that gathers various writings and texts in order to convey the full historical arc of transatlantic slavery in the US.

Our guest is Vaclav Smil, a Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Manitoba. Smil is the author of 40+ books on topics like energy, environmental and population change, food production and nutrition, technical innovation, risk asssessment, and public policy. He joins us to discuss his accessible and compelling new book of short essays, "Numbers Don't Lie." It's an eclectic, statistics-driven volume that effectively shows how numbers reveal the true state of our world today -- and how such numbers, much like unalterable facts, are what matter most.

Our guest on ST is Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, a professor of internet governance and regulation at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. He's also a faculty affiliate of the Belfer Center of Science and International Affairs at Harvard. Mayer-Schönberger joins us to talk about "Framers: Human Advantage in an Age of Technology and Turmoil," a new book for which he's a co-author.

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