StudioTulsa

Arts & Culture of interest to Northeastern Oklahoma

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Our guest is Dr. Dan Caldwell, a Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Pepperdine University. He recently gave a private, online-only address to the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations (TCFR) on the topic of "What Would a Biden Foreign Policy Be?" Dr. Caldwell now helps to coordinate the campaign activities of a group of national security and foreign policy professionals who have endorsed Vice-President Biden in his bid for the White House. Over the years, Dr. Caldwell has taught at the Naval Postgraduate School, Stanford, UCLA, and Brown University.

Our guest is Jared Yates Sexton, whose writing has included books and articles on politics, culture, and social justice, as well as works of fiction; he's an associate professor of creative writing at Georgia Southern University. He joins us to discuss his new book, which argues that the idea of "American exceptionalism" is not only false -- but it's been false since the country was founded.

(Note: This discussion first aired back in June.) What happens when a woman seeking an abortion in the U.S. is turned away? Our guest is Diana Greene Foster, PhD, who set out to answer this question as definitively as possible.

We welcome Sarah Smarsh back to StudioTulsa for a discussion of her new book. It's a collection of essays that all focus on a certain country-music icon who also happens to be one of the most unifying figures in American culture: Dolly Parton. Smarsh talks with us about how Parton has, for decades now, both embodied and emboldened American women who live and work in poverty. Few other musical artists, the author argues, seem as truly **genuine** as Parton, and few can match her gift for telling powerful stories about life, love, men, family, hard times, and surviving.

In late 2015, Zac Easter, a young man from a small town in Iowa, took his own life. The reason? According to the many journals and detailed writings that Zac left behind, this act of suicide was chosen by Zac because he was unable to continue his long-running battle against worsening traumatic brain injuries -- injuries that stemmed directly from the fact that Zac had been a football player, from third grade through high school.

Photo by Kim Matthai Leland - The Spectrum

On this edition of ST, we learn about the next Tulsa Symphony Orchestra concert, which happens on Sunday afternoon (the 18th) at 3pm at ONEOK Field in downtown Tulsa. (At this concert, masks will be required to attend, and social distancing will be in effect.) The concert will feature Mozart's Abduction from the Seraglio Overture, Max Bruch's Scottish Fantasy, and Brahms' Symphony No. 4 in E minor. Our guest will be the Guest Conductor for this concert, Sarah Hicks.

Photo by Schnake Turnbo Frank.

The upcoming 2020 Homecoming Weekend here at the University of Tulsa will be, unfortuneately, quite different this time around, given the pandemic. But one Homecoming tradition that will continue is the designation and celebration of the annual J. Paschal Twyman Award. Our guest is the distinguished recipient of that award for this year, Steve Turnbo. After graduating with a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Tulsa in 1967, Mr.

Our guest is Clarissa Ward, CNN’s chief international correspondent, who joins us to talk about her new autobiography. As noted of this work by a critic with Booklist: "Ward details her often harrowing career in this page-turning memoir.... Readers will come away with at least a basic understanding of multiple international conflicts. This is a wonderful addition to the list of recent titles about women working in war-torn lands." And further, from Publishers Weekly: "[An] insightful memoir....

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Benjamin Lorr, a writer based in New York City. He tells us about his interesting new book, "The Secret Life of Groceries: The Dark Miracle of the American Supermarket." As Lorr writes in the Introduction for this work: "This book is about the grocery store. About the people who work there and the routes of supply that define it. It is the product of five years of research, hundreds of interviews, and thousands of hours tracking down and working alongside the buyers, brokers, marketers, and managers whose lives and choices define our diet.

We are pleased to welcome Mark Dolph back to StudioTulsa. He's Curator of History at Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. He tells us about an exciting new exhibition at that museum presenting the work of Shan Goshorn, the late Tulsa-area artist.

Our guest is longtime Tulsa resident Jane Mudgett, a well-respected local leader and businesswoman who's also a certified coach, a trainer, and a partner at the Exceptional Leaders Lab. She joins us to talk about her book, which first appeared earlier this year.

Gardiner Gallery of Art at Oklahoma State University / OSU DEPARTMENT OF ART, GRAPHIC DESIGN, AND ART HISTORY

Who actually designed Tulsa's iconic Boston Avenue Methodist Church, that widely celebrated art deco structure within the city's skyline which was completed in 1929? Many architecture experts will tell you it was the well-known Tulsa architect Bruce Goff...but was it? Our guest on ST is Teresa Holder, the manager of the Gardiner Gallery at OSU in Stillwater.

Our guest is Connor Towne O'Neill, whose writing has appeared in New York Magazine, Vulture, and Slate, and who works as a producer on the NPR podcast, White Lies. He joins us to discuss his first book, which is just out. It's called "Down Along with That Devil's Bones: A Reckoning with Monuments, Memory, and the Legacy of White Supremacy." Per Publishers Weekly, the book offers "an eloquent and provocative examination of the links between protests over Confederate monuments in the South and the resurgence of white supremacy.... O'Neill writes with grace and genuine curiosity....

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the author Terri Cheney. Formerly a successful entertainment attorney -- her clients included Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones -- Cheny now works as an advocate for destigmatizing mental illness.

Our guest is Christina Burke, the Curator of Native American and Non-Western Art at Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa. She tells us about an exciting new show at the museum, "Hearts of Our People: Native Women Artists," which is now on view for members only -- and which will open to the public on Wednesday the 7th. As noted the Philbrook website: "Women have long been the creative force behind Native art.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in June.) Our guest is Sonia Shah, a science journalist who's long covered the intersection of science, politics, culture, and human rights for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and other outlets. Her latest book, which she tells us about, takes on many of our centuries-long assumptions about migration. That book is "The Next Great Migration: The Beauty and Terror of Life on the Move." Per The New York Times Book Review, it focuses "with compassion and insight a deeply complex and challenging subject....

Our guest is Dan Alexander, a senior editor at Forbes Magazine, who joins us to discuss his new book, "White House, Inc." It's an in-depth investigation into President Trump's business holdings, and into how he used the highest office in the land to enrich these holdings. In order to document the president's endeavors to make money from his office, the book examines his exclusive clubs, luxury hotels, overseas partnerships, commercial properties, and personal mansions.

While technology has profoundly disrupted virtually every sector of our economy, it hasn't had that large an impact on American education. Teachers are using more technology today, but the essential model hasn't changed that much, despite tech proponents argument that algorithim and peer-guided learning can transform the system. 

Our guest on this edition of ST Medical Monday is Dr. Jonathan M. Berman, who tells us about his important new book. That book is "Anti-vaxxers: How to Challenge a Misinformed Movement." As was noted of this work by Publishers Weekly: "Science professor Berman debuts with a useful guide for readers concerned about the opposition to vaccinations.... The book's greatest value comes from its insights into how common cognitive errors can lead even the well-informed to see false correlations between vaccination and health problems.

(Note: This interview first aired back in May.) Our guest is Walter Johnson, the Winthrop Professor of History and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University. His new book is a far-reaching, unflinching, and complicated account of race relations in his hometown: St. Louis, Missouri. From Lewis and Clark's 1804 expedition to the 2014 uprising in Ferguson, the course of American events, Johnson argues, has been charted in St. Louis.

Our guest is David Nasaw, the bestselling author and noted historian who, until last year, served as the Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. Professor of History at the CUNY Graduate Center.

The organization known as MS-13 -- often in the headlines, especially since they've been repeatedly referred to by President Trump -- is thought to have approximately ten thousand members located in dozens of states across the US, and it's routinely linked to thousands of murders each year in this country and abroad. But MS-13 is also widely misunderstood, as we learn on today's ST.

It's scary, but by now it's also obvious -- our environment today contains thousands (literally, thousands) of toxic chemicals that it did NOT contain just a few decades ago. How are these chemicals affecting our health? And what can we, as individuals, do about this? Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the co-author of a new book called "Non-Toxic: Guide to Living Healthy in a Chemical World." Dr. Aly Cohen is a board certified rheumatologist and integrative medicine specialist, as well as an environmental health expert based in Princeton, New Jersey.

Tomorrow night -- Saturday the 19th, at 7:30pm -- the Signature Symphony will perform an outdoor, socially-distanced concert in downtown Tulsa at ONEOK Field. Beethoven's 5th will be on the program for this one-hour concert, along with music composed by Randy Newman for the popular 1984 film, "The Natural," as well as a piece composed in honor of Stephen Goforth, a long-time Signature musician who died earlier this year.

Our guest is TU's Phi Beta Kappa Carl F. Cranor Visiting Scholar, Corey Brettschneider. He joins us to talk about his recent book, "The Oath and the Office." This book will form the basis for his upcoming, free-to-the-public Phi Beta Kappa lecture, which Brettschneider will give online this evening (the 17th) at 5pm.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we get to know Kojo Asamoa-Caesar, who is the Democrat running for Congress in Oklahoma's First District. As noted at his campaign website: "Asamoa-Caesar is a first-generation American, the son of a certified nursing assistant and a taxi driver who were drawn to the United States from Ghana by the call of the American Dream....

Our guest is the writer Jeff Hobbs, whose new book closely follows four Los Angeles high school boys as they apply to college. These four teens are seniors at two very different high schools in L.A. -- one in Compton, the other in Beverly Hills -- and by telling their individual, personal stories, Hobbs reveals what our nation's young people (across all socio-economic backgrounds) are now confronting at home, at school, among peers, and throughout society.

On this edition of our program, we learn about bariatric surgery, also known as weight-loss surgery. Once thought of in strictly "cosmetic" terms, the procedure has become more common, and more applicable, in recent years. Indeed, bariatric surgery is now known to foster significant loss of weight, recovery from diabetes, and improvement in the risk of cardiovascular issues. Our guest is a faculty member at the OU-TU School of Community Medicine and a specialist in bariatric procedures, Dr. Robert B. Lim. Dr.

We're pleased to welcome the Tulsa-based attorney, historian, and author Hannibal B. Johnson back to StudioTulsa. An active and well-respected expert on matters of diversity, inclusion, and social justice, Johnson is also the education chair for the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Commission. He joins us to discuss his newest book, "Black Wall Street 100: An American City Grapples With Its Historical Racial Trauma." As was noted of this volume by Dr.

Our guest is Rachel Louise Snyder, an award-winning journalist and professor of creative writing and journalism at American University. She talks about her newest book, which is just out in paperback; the book is "No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us." As was noted of this widely-acclaimed study by The Washington Post: "Compulsively readable.... In a writing style that's as gripping as good fiction, as intimate as memoir, and deeply informed, [Snyder] takes us into the lives of the abused, the abusers, and the survivors....

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