StudioTulsa

Arts & Culture of interest to Northeastern Oklahoma

Our guest is Adam Tooze, a professor of history at Columbia University and the author of "Crashed," which was a New York Times Notable Book of 2018 and one of The Economist's Books of the Year. His timely new book, which he tells us about, mixes finance, politics, business, economics, medicine, and recent world history in order to trace what went wrong -- and why -- during the turning-point year that was 2020. This new book is "Shutdown: How Covid Shook the World's Economy." As was noted by Reuters: "Tooze makes a strong case for looking back and beginning to draw some conclusions....

(Note: This interview originally aired back in June.) Our guest is the novelist Jonathan Lee, whose latest book is a vivid, page-turning work of historical fiction titled "The Great Mistake." It's a novel set in 19th-century New York City that digs into the life and times of -- and the mysterious murder of -- a man named Andrew Haswell Green.

(Note: This conversation originally aired earlier this year.) History is one thing; mythology is another. And at times, of course, these two can overlap, or blur, or get confused. Such is the case with the Alamo, as our guest argues. Longtime journalist Chris Tomlinson is a columnist for The Houston Chronicle and The San Antonio Express-News, and he's one of the authors of a book titled "Forget the Alamo: The Rise and Fall of an American Myth." As was noted of this work in Publishers Weekly: "Substantive yet wryly humorous....

Our guest is Dr. Jillian Horton, a medical educator, writer, musician, and podcaster based in Canada. As an award-winning teacher of mindfulness, she works with doctors at all stages of their careers who are dealing with guilt, grief, burnout, frustration, and/or other professional pressures. Dr.

Today we hear from a medical professional whose work is having a profound impact on the wider realms of continuing and professional education. Our guest is the newest Brock Prize in Education Innovation Laureate, Dr. Sanjeev Arora. He's the founder of Project ECHO, an instructional and tele-mentoring model that provides professional development to under-served and/or remote areas. It's a fast-growing program that's making educational change occur at the local, national, and global levels. Dr.

Our guest is the acclaimed African-American artist Lonnie Holley, born in Alabama in 1950, who has three pieces now on view at Philbrook in that museum's "From the Limitations of Now" exhibit, which closes on September 5th. Known for his mixed-media and found-and-discarded-object art pieces, Holley is also an "experimental blues" musician who's made several albums. He will perform with his band tomorrow night (Friday the 3rd) at Philbrook's garden space, beginning at 7pm.

(Note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) Our guest is Shankar Vedantam, the bestselling author and host of the popular "Hidden Brain" podcast and public-radio show. He joins us to discuss his book, "Useful Delusions: The Power and Paradox of the Self-Deceiving Brain." This book takes a detailed, research-driven look at the fundamental role of self-deception in human life -- that is, its positive as well as its negative aspects. As was noted by The Washington Post: "Powerful....

Photo from HBO [via NPR.org]

On this edition of ST, we revisit our interview with John Carreyrou, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter with The Wall Street Journal. In early 2020, we spoke with Carreyrou about "Bad Blood," his book about the bogus Silicon Valley blood-testing start-up known as Theranos...and about the charismatic young CEO of Theranos, Elizabeth Holmes, who at one point seemed to be taking the world by storm a la Mark Zuckerberg or Bill Gates.

Why do human beings sweat? And what other animals on this planet sweat, and why do they do it? Are there health benefits to sweating? Our guest is Sarah Everts, a science writer who has written for Scientific American, Smithsonian, New Scientist, and other publications, and who teaches journalism at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.

Our guest is the poet and fiction writer Honorée Fanonne Jeffers, who teaches creative writing and literature at OU. She joins us to talk about her new book, "The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois," which is a very well-regarded debut novel. As was noted of this work in a starred review in Publishers Weekly: "A staggering and ambitious saga exploring African American history.

On this edition of ST, we are discussing the history of the War on Terror -- i.e., the open-ended, multi-directional conflict that the U.S. government enacted some twenty years ago, in the immediate wake of 9/11 -- as well as how this war has moved both American politics and American society in increasingly authoritarian (and even racist) directions. Our guest is Spencer Ackerman, a national-security correspondent who's written for The New Republic, WIRED, The Guardian, and The Daily Beast.

(Note: This interview first aired back in March.) Our guest is Kevin Brockmeier, an imaginative and acclaimed writer based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

On this edition of ST, we learn about the Tulsa Higher Education Consortium, which is, per its website, a "multi-institutional collaborative effort to meaningfully improve students' journeys toward degree completion, professional independence, and mobility." Our guest is Dr. Laura Latta, the executive director of the THEC. Seven Tulsa-area higher-education institutions, as Dr.

Photo via Corian.com

Ever happen to look at a painting on the wall of some hospital and wonder: "Who chose THIS picture? And why is it hanging HERE?" Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the London-based writer Lou Stoppard, who writes about style, trends, and culture for The New Yorker Magazine and other publications.

Our guest on ST is Emily Oster, a professor of economics at Brown University whose earlier books include "Expecting Better" and "Cribsheet." She joins us to talk about her new book, "The Family Firm: A Data-Driven Guide to Better Decision Making in the Early School Years." As was noted of this volume by The Washington Post: "A targeted mini-MBA program designed to help moms and dads establish best practices for day-to-day operations....

(Note: This interview first aired back in February.) Our guest is Michelle Commander, an Associate Director and Curator at The Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture, which is a branch of the New York Public Library located in Harlem. The Schomberg Center has put out a pathbreaking new anthology, which she tells us about. The book is "Unsung: Unheralded Narratives of American Slavery and Abolition." It's a well-edited volume that gathers various writings and texts in order to convey the full historical arc of transatlantic slavery in the US.

Our guest is Vaclav Smil, a Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Manitoba. Smil is the author of 40+ books on topics like energy, environmental and population change, food production and nutrition, technical innovation, risk asssessment, and public policy. He joins us to discuss his accessible and compelling new book of short essays, "Numbers Don't Lie." It's an eclectic, statistics-driven volume that effectively shows how numbers reveal the true state of our world today -- and how such numbers, much like unalterable facts, are what matter most.

Our guest on ST is Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, a professor of internet governance and regulation at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. He's also a faculty affiliate of the Belfer Center of Science and International Affairs at Harvard. Mayer-Schönberger joins us to talk about "Framers: Human Advantage in an Age of Technology and Turmoil," a new book for which he's a co-author.

Everyday during our daily routine, we are "nudged" to make choices and decisions in a particular way. Most are beneficial to us, others, not. They range from our car reminding us to buckle up when we drive, to the ATM making us take our card back before dispensing cash, to our streaming services and e-commerce sites suggesting other items based on our previous history.

Kris Grogan / U.S. Customs and Border Protection

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr Samantha Montano, a specialist on emergency management, and a professor at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy about her new book, "Disasterology: Dispatches from the Frontlines of the Climate Crisis." Although emergency management vowed 'never again' after the mistakes in the response to Hurricane Katrina (Montano's first disaster experience), recent experiences after Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and subsequent hurricanes along the Gulf Coast, lead Montano and other emergency management professionals to think that the next catastrophic disa

Our guest today is Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Glenn Frankel, whose recent work has explored the issues and stories behind some of America's classic films. His books employs in-depth interviews with the film's director, stars, crew, casting team, and others to provide the definitive account of an American movie like no other. His recent books on the films High Noon and The Searchers have focused on some of the contemporary themes at play in these classic Westerns.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Bret Stetka, an editorial director at Medscape.com, which is the professional division of WebMD.com. A non-practicing physician and active freelance health/science journalist, Stetka joins us to discuss his fascinating book, "A History of the Human Brain: From the Sea Sponge to CRISPR, How Our Brain Evolved." It's a readable and engaging history of how our most mysterious organ developed over time...from the brain's improbable and watery beginnings to the super-complex marvel that's found within the head of Homo sapiens today. 

  

Our guest is Carlos Moreno, a Tulsa-based graphic designer, researcher, and freelance writer who originally hails from California, and who's been living and working in Tulsa since the 1990s. Moreno joins us to discuss his new book, "The Victory of Greenwood." This volume presents a novel and engrossing history of Tulsa's Greenwood community by offering more than 20 different biographical portraits of such key "Black Wall Street" figures as John and Loula Williams, B.C. Franklin, the Rev. Ben H. Hill, Edwin McCabe, George Monroe, and various others.

Our show today focuses on a newly publsihed book that's widely seen as the definitive journalistic account of former President Trump's final year in office. The book is "I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump's Catastrophic Final Year," and it's written by Philip Rucker and Carol Leonnig, the Pulitzer-Prize winning Washington Post reporters who earlier gave us "A Very Stable Genius." Rucker is our guest on StudioTulsa.

"Goldenrod: Poems"

Jul 28, 2021

Our guest is the Ohio-based, award-winning writer and poet Maggie Smith, whose latest book of poems has recently been released. It's called "Goldenrod." It's the first book to appear from Smith since her bestselling memoir, "Keep Moving: Notes on Loss, Creativity, and Change." Like the best of Smith's earlier verse, the poems in "Goldenrod" look carefully and engagingly at the experiences of daily life -- both the mundane and the magical -- in order to affirm, celebrate, lament, and/or investigate the human experience.

What is the Delta Variant, and how is it related to the novel Coronavirus? What exactly do we know about the rapid spread of the Delta Variant now happening in Tulsa County -- and across our state? And what's the relationship between this rate of spreading and Oklahoma's relatively low vaccination rate? Are there other Coronavirus variants out there -- either here in the US or worldwide? And when will American kids under the age of 12 be allowed to get vaxxed? Our guests on ST Medical Monday are Dr. Bruce Dart, Executive Director of the Tulsa Health Department, and Dr.

Photo via www.somersetlive.co.uk

Our guest is the award-winning science journalist Melinda Wenner Moyer, whose work appears in Slate, Scientific American, and The New York Times. She's also a parent, and she joins us to discuss her first book, which is just out. "How to Raise Kids Who Aren't A**holes: Science-Based Strategies for Better Parenting -- from Tots to Teens" is a guidebook focused on the many various concerns that moms and dads actually have in today's America.

(Note: This conversation first aired back in April.) Our guest on StudioTulsa is Dr. Fern L. Johnson, a Senior Research Scholar and Professor Emerita at Clark University who focuses on race and culture. She and her partner, Marlene G.

Our guest is Dr. Christine Montross, who's an associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and a practicing inpatient psychiatrist. She joins us to discuss her well-researched, quite unsettling new book, "Waiting for an Echo: The Madness of American Incarceration." As was noted of this volume in The New York Times Book Review: "A haunting and harrowing indictment of the deep psychological damage inflicted by the nation's punitive structures.... Montross is a gifted, often compelling storyteller....

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