Avant-Garde Art

Our guest on StudioTulsa is the noted classical/crossover/experimental cellist and activist Amanda Gookin, who'll play a pair of interesting shows here in Tulsa this coming weekend as part of the 2019 OK Electric Festival. Gookin will be at Living Arts on Friday night (the 22nd) and at Duet Jazz on Saturday night (the 23rd). She'll be performing pieces from her newly created Forward Music Project 2.0, for which five female composers crafted cello-plus-electronics-and-multimedia works addressing such timely topics as body shaming and women's rights in Iran.

"The key to the work up to this point" by Hilma af Klint (1907)

On this episode of ST, we offer another Museum Confidential podcast. (The podcast, now in its second season, is co-created twice a month by our own Scott Gregory and Jeff Martin of Philbrook Museum.) This time out, MC learns about a special, much-discussed exhibition now on view at the Guggenheim Museum in New York. It's a remarkable series of works by the obscure yet visionary Swedish artist Hilma af Klint (1862-1944). The exhibit is titled "Paintings for the Future" and closes April 23rd.

Dylan went electric. Miles went electric. Everyone, it seems, has gone electric by now...but what about the world of classical music? How common is it to witness, say, an "amp'd up" chamber music trio? On this edition of ST, our guest is the noted Tulsa-based composer, musician, and music educator, Noam Faingold, who's also the curator of the upcoming OK Electric music festival. This festival will happen Friday and Saturday night, the 28th and 29th, at Living Arts of Tulsa.

On this installment of ST, we learn about the Tulsa Artist Fellowship, or TAF, which was established last year by the George Kaiser Family Foundation to both enrich and expand the local art scene by recruiting artists from all over the nation to the Tulsa area. This fellowship, per its website, "provides an unrestricted stipend, free housing, and work-space in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to US Resident artists.... The Fellows are expected to integrate into the local arts community, such as [via] studio and collection visits.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Laleh Mehran, a Denver-based multi-disciplinary artist who moved to the United States from Iran when she was a child in the 1970s. Her art work explores cultures and locations, ideas and identities, patterns and shapes -- and it seems especially focused on issues of technology, geography, and media. Her striking pieces have been shown/installed over the years -- both individually and in group shows -- in Holland, Germany, Italy, Massachusetts, Oregon, Pittsburgh, and elsewhere.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Norbert Herber, a musician, sound artist, and Department of Telecommunications faculty member at Indiana University, who is presenting an art exhibition soon on the TU campus. This show, called "For the [ ] of the Loop," will be on view at the Hogue Gallery within the TU School of Art from October 2nd through the 29th.

On this installment of ST, we speak with the poet and performance/conceptual artist, Kenneth Goldsmith, who has appeared on The Colbert Report, held a poetry reading in the White House, and published more than ten books. He's also the first-ever poet laureate to be selected by The Museum of Modern Art -- and he'll offer a free-to-the-public poetry reading tonight, Tuesday the 22nd, at 9pm in Tyrell Hall on the TU campus.

On this edition of ST, we welcome Jeffrey Zeigler, the gifted cello player and composer who's best known for his eight-year tenure with the internationally known Kronos Quartet. Since leaving that collective about two years ago, Zeigler has embarked on an interesting (and decidedly multi-genre) solo career that's found him collaborating with a host of fascinating musicians -- such as singer/songwriter Norah Jones, avant-jazz guru John Zorn, pianist Vijay Iyer, composer Philip Glass, Wilco drummer Glenn Kotche, and so forth.