The Bill of Rights

Police officers in the U.S. are nine times more likely to kill African-American men than they are any other group of citizens. A tragic statistic, to be sure, but also -- given so many recent events -- a statistic that many won't find very surprising. How police forces across the nation relate to matters of racism, civil rights, and race relations are now coming under close scrutiny. But what about the role of the courts in this issue?

Our guest on ST is Adam Jentleson, the public affairs director at Democracy Forward and a former deputy chief of staff to Senator Harry Reid. Jentleson joins us to discuss his new book, which argues that far from reflecting the intent and design of the Founding Fathers, the U.S. Senate -- from John C. Calhoun in the mid-1800s up through Mitch McConnell today -- has been transformed by a tenacious, often extremist minority of white conservatives. Per The New York Times: "An impeccably timed book....

Our guest is TU's Phi Beta Kappa Carl F. Cranor Visiting Scholar, Corey Brettschneider. He joins us to talk about his recent book, "The Oath and the Office." This book will form the basis for his upcoming, free-to-the-public Phi Beta Kappa lecture, which Brettschneider will give online this evening (the 17th) at 5pm.

Our guest is the widely celebrated novelist and nonfiction writer Nicholson Baker, whose new book is an engrossing mash-up of history, journalism, and memoir. The book is called "Baseless," and it's focused on the modern-day Freedom of Information Act, or FOIA. Baker's gripping and typically candid account carefully documents what it feels like to try to write about major historical events in a world of pervasive redactions, witheld records, widespead cover-ups, and glacially slow governmental responses.

On this episode of ST, we revisit a discussion that first aired back in October. At that time, we spoke with Eric Foner, the DeWitt Clinton Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University.

With the 2020 presidential race now well underway, the League of Women Voters of Metropolitan Tulsa is seeking out women in northeastern Oklahoma who could be president. The League will honor 10 such women from our community -- all of them dedicated to leadership and community service, with nominations presently being taken -- at its upcoming Madam President event (happening on May 5; more info at this link).

Our guest is Prof. Barry Friedman, who is the Fuchsberg Professor of Law at New York University School of Law and the director of the Policing Project. He joins us to discuss his new book, "Unwarranted: Policing Without Permission." As noted of this widely acclaimed study in a starred review in Kirkus: "A law professor diagnoses the ills of American policing and prescribes a healthy dose of sunlight. 'Policing in the United States -- from the overzealous beat cop all the way to the NSA -- is out of control,' writes Friedman, and the fault lies not with the police but with us.

On this edition of ST, we chat with The Reverend Dr. William J. Barber II, who's the president of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP. Rev.

Our guest on ST is journalist David K. Shipler, who reported for The New York Times from 1966 to 1988 in New York, Saigon, Moscow, Jerusalem, and Washington, D.C. Shipler is also the author of several books, including "Russia," "The Working Poor," and "Arab and Jew," the last of which won the Pulitzer Prize. He joins us to talk about his latest book, "Rights at Risk: The Limits of Liberty in Modern America," which is just out in paperback. Publishers Weekly, in a starred review, called this work "fascinating and provocative....