Bluegrass Music

Our guest on ST is the widely acclaimed mandolinist and composer, Jeff Midkiff. He will soon perform his "Concerto for Mandolin and Orchestra: From the Blue Ridge" with the Signature Symphony at TCC. The concert happens on Saturday night, the 28th, at the TCC Van Trease PACE (at 10300 E. 81st Street in Tulsa). It begins at 7:30pm; ticket information is posted here. The evening will also feature Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky's 5th Symphony as well as the Overture from "Ruslan and Lyudmila" (the opera by Mikhail Glinka).

On this edition of StudioTulsa, an interesting chat with the locally based filmmaker James Payne. His new movie, a feature-length, award-winning documentary called "Far Western," will have its Tulsa debut screening at the Circle Cinema on Thursday the 5th at 7pm.

On this edition of ST, we present an equal-parts tuneful and thoughtful conversation with Noam Pikelny, the Grammy-nominated banjoist who's probably best known as a founding member of the progressive bluegrass group known as the Punch Brothers. Pikelny will be performing at the OK Mozart Festival in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, tonight, Monday the 10th; he'll take the stage --- for a concert entitled "An Evening of Bluegrass" --- alongside Bryan Sutton, Ronnie McCoury, Luke Bulla, and Barry Bales.

Today, we are happy to welcome back to our program Tim Sharp, who's been the artistic director of Tulsa Oratorio Chorus for the past few years now. (You can read Tim's bio here, by the way.) Tomorrow night, Thursday the 1st, at Cain's Ballroom in downtown Tulsa, Sharp will lead the Tulsa Chamber Chorus and Bluegrass Band in a performance of his work, "Come Away to the Skies: A High, Lonesome Bluegrass Mass." The concert starts at 7:30pm; doors open at 6:45pm, with a pre-show BBQ dinner and exhibit available.

On this installment of ST, which first aired in July, we're looking back on the life and music of the late Doc Watson, who died in late May at the age of 89. Watson was a truly legendary guitarist and singer whose work in the realms of folk, bluegrass, country, blues, and gospel music won him several Grammy Awards and universal acclaim. Despite being blind from infancy, he had a long, highly influential career; his guitar-playing (and especially his flat-picking skills) as well as his vast knowledge of traditional American music were, and still are, considered unequaled.

On this installment of ST, we're looking back on the life and music of the late Doc Watson, who died in May at the age of 89. Watson was a truly legendary guitarist and singer whose work in the realms of folk, bluegrass, country, blues, and gospel music won him several Grammy Awards and universal acclaim. Despite being blind from infancy, he had a long and highly influential career; his guitar-playing (and especially his flat-picking skills) as well as his vast knowledge of traditional American music were, and still are, considered unequaled.