Child Psychology

We speak with Susan Cain, who ignited a national conversation a few years ago with her widely celebrated nonfiction book, "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking." This book challenged how we see introverts -- and how introverts see themselves -- and was mainly focused on the workplace. But now, as we learn on today's ST, Cain is back with a new book, which is aimed at kids and their experiences in the classroom.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in September.) Our guest on ST is Steve Silberman, who's written about science and cultural affairs for WIRED and other leading magazines for more than two decades.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Ron Suskind, whose bestselling nonfiction books include "Confidence Men," "The Way of the World," and "The One Percent Doctrine," among others. Suskind joins us to discuss his latest book, a memoir called "Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism." This work, first published last year, chronicles Suskind's family’s two-decade struggle with his son Owen's autism. As was noted of the book by the St.

We're probably all aware of the much-publicized "online predators" who go after children these days on the internet, preying on innocent kids by way of trickery and violence. But these crimes, while obviously sick and deplorable, are over-hyped. How did this pervasive over-hyping come to be, and why does it persist? On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Dr.

On this edition of ST, we learn about a locally based conference on the prevention of child sexual abuse, which is happening today and tomorrow (the 8th and 9th) at the OU-Tulsa Schusterman Center (at 41st and Yale). "Shifting Child Sexual Abuse Paradigms" -- hosted by the nonprofit Empowering Adults-Protecting Children, Inc. -- will bring together a range of experts who work every day in this regard with children and families throughout Oklahoma.

On this edition of ST on Health, an interesting discussion with Dr. Dana Suskind, a Professor of Surgery at the University of Chicago who's also the Director of that school's Pediatric Cochlear Implant Program. She's probably best known as the founder and director of the Thirty Million Words Initiative.

On this edition of ST, our guest is Steve Silberman, who's written about science and cultural affairs for WIRED and other leading magazines for more than two decades.

Our guest today on ST is the child welfare advocate and author Ashley Rhodes-Courter (born 1985), whose first book, a memoir called "Three Little Words," began as a prize-winning high school essay, later appeared in The New York Times Magazine, and finally became a bestselling book.

On this installment of ST, we speak with Dr. Howard Gardner, a Professor of Education at Harvard University, who is the 2015 Brock International Prize in Education Laureate. Well-regarded worldwide for his groundbreaking work in psychology, Gardner is best known for his theory of "multiple intelligences," which basically sees intelligence as multi-dimensional rather than as a singular trait or quality.

(Please note: This show originally aired in October of last year.) Our guest is Kristin Russo, who -- along with her colleague, Danielle Owens-Reid -- communicates daily with LGBTQ youth and families at the award-winning website called Everyone Is Gay. Russo and Owens-Reid have a book out that stems directly from this website; it's called "This Is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids: A Question & Answer Guide to Everyday Life," and Russo talks with us about it.

Our guest on ST is Dr. George Glass, a longtime Texas-based physician who's also the co-author of "The Overparenting Epidemic: Why Helicopter Parenting Is Bad for Your Kids...and Dangerous for You, Too!" While the notion of "overparenting" or "helicopter parenting" is not really a new concept, what is rather newly and widely apparent is that our society's first generation of overparented children are now becoming adults in their own right.

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On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Deborah Leong, professor emerita of psychology at Metropolitan State College of Denver, where she taught for more than three decades. Dr.

Born in Spain and raised by a struggling single mother, Lisa Lovatt-Smith became an editor at British Vogue at age nineteen, the youngest in that magazine's history. By her thirties, Lisa had achieved her dream career and an absolutely glamorous life in Paris. But then her adopted daughter Sabrina was expelled from school, and Lisa took her to volunteer at an orphanage in Ghana with the hope of getting Sabrina's life back on track. What mother and daughter discovered there changed both their lives.

Our guest on ST is Kristin Russo, who -- along with her colleague, Dannielle Owens-Reid -- communicates daily with LGBTQ youth and families at the award-winning website called Everyone Is Gay. Russo and Owens-Reid have a new book out that stems directly from this website; it's called "This Is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids: A Question & Answer Guide to Everyday Life," and Russo talks with us about it. The book is, as she explains, meant to be an easy-to-read, go-to resource for parents hoping to understand and communicate with their gay child.

On Thursday and Friday of this week, the 18th and 19th, TU's University School will present a pair of free-to-the-public presentations by Dr. Charles Fay. Dr. Fay is a parent, consultant, bestselling author, and president of the Love and Logic Institute, Inc., which he co-founded in 1977 with his father, the noted child-rearing expert Jim Fay.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview from April of this year. At that time, we spoke with Dr. Stephen P. Hinshaw, Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, and Vice-Chair for Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Hinshaw is also the co-author of "The ADHD Explosion: Myths, Medication, Money, and Today’s Push for Performance," which he discusses with us on today's show.

(Note: This interview first aired earlier this year.) Family secrets. They're as common and as varied --- and as much a part of life --- as are families themselves. Such secrets, those we keep and those we discover, greatly influence who we are and how we live. And our guest is an expert in this regard: Jane Isay is a writer (and former book editor and publisher) whose previous works include "Walking on Eggshells," about parents and their adult children, and "Mom Still Likes You Best," about adult siblings.

Kids are wonderful. Kids are amazing. Kids enrich, brighten, and deepen our lives as parents, obviously. But they also change us --- in so many ways --- and "being a parent" in America today means something very different from what it meant, say, fifty or sixty years ago.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Stephen P. Hinshaw, Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, and Vice-Chair for Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Hinshaw is also the editor of "Psychological Bulletin" --- and the co-author of a new book, "The ADHD Explosion: Myths, Medication, Money, and Today’s Push for Performance," which he discusses with us today.

Today we listen back to fascinating discussion that first aired on ST in November. At that time, our guest was the author and journalist Andrew Solomon, whose hefty, far-reaching, and award-winning book, "Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity," had just appeared in paperback.

(Note: This show originally aired last August.) Today, an interesting chat with Catherine Steiner-Adair, a noted clinical psychologist, school consultant, and author. She maintains a private practice in Massachusetts, is a clinical instructor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and is also an associate psychologist at McLean Hospital, which is a psychiatric hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts.

Family secrets. They're as common and as varied --- and as much a part of life --- as are families themselves. Such secrets, those that we keep and those that we discover, greatly influence who we are and how we live. And our guest is an expert in this regard: Jane Isay is a writer (and former book editor and publisher) whose previous works include "Walking on Eggshells," about parents and their adult children, and "Mom Still Likes You Best," about adult siblings.

Our guest is author and journalist Andrew Solomon, whose hefty, far-reaching, and award-winning book, "Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity," was one of the most widely acclaimed works of nonfiction to be published last year. The book has just appeared in paperback; Solomon joins us today by phone.

On our show today, an interesting chat with Catherine Steiner-Adair, EdD, a noted clinical psychologist, school consultant, and author. She maintains a private practice in Massachusetts, is a clinical instructor in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and is also an associate psychologist at McLean Hospital, which is a psychiatric hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts.

On this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, our guest host Dr. John Henning Schumann speaks with one of his esteemed medical colleagues, Dr. Jennifer Hays-Grudo, who is a Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine as well as the George Kaiser Family Foundation Chair in Community Medicine at the OU-Tulsa School of Community Medicine. Dr. Hays-Grudo received both her master's and doctorate in developmental psychology from the University of Houston and her bachelor's in psychology from Texas Tech University. "I'm interested in how people grow and change over time," she says. Dr.

On this encore presentation of ST, we speak with Dr. Nancy Rappaport, a noted child psychiatrist and author. An Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Rappaport is the co-author of a new book called, "The Behavior Code: A Practical Guide to Understanding and Teaching the Most Challenging Students" (Harvard Education Press). This book --- written with Jessica Minahan, a behavioral analyst --- is based on an academic collaboration dating back nearly a decade, and is aimed mainly at K-6 educators but will have much to offer parents, as well.

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