The CIA

All of Washington, DC -- indeed, all of American politics -- has been in a frenzy ever since a whistleblower's complaint came to light, only a couple of weeks ago, regarding President Trump's July 25th phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. Information about this call prompted House Democrats to begin their impeachment inquiry of the President, and now a second whistleblower is apparently coming forward (as well as, possibly, a third). On ST today, we look back on the history of whistleblowers in America. Our guest is Prof.

Our guest is Philip Mudd, former deputy director of the CIA Counterterrorist Center, who tells us about his new book, "Black Site." It depicts one of the most controversial and unsettling initiatives in American history -- i.e., the post-9/11 counterterrorism effort created and led by the CIA. Just after September 11, 2001, as we learn, the CIA evolved into a war-fighting intelligence service, constructing what was known internally as "the Program" -- a web of top-secret detention facilities intended to help prevent future attacks on American soil and worldwide.

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Our guest is John Brennan, the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency, where he served from 2013 to 2017. Previously a deputy national security advisor and assistant to President Barack Obama for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, Brennan today speaks to various audiences about how to both think of and respond to global events, terrorism, and cybersecurity concerns.

What happens when we as a society stop trusting our experts, stop consulting our longtime scholars, and stop listening to our intelligence-community professionals? What happens to our foreign policy? How are this nation's relationships with the rest of the world affected? How is our government itself altered? Our guest on ST is the conservative writer and scholar, Tom Nichols, who is also a Professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College.

(Note: This interview originally aired last fall.) On this edition of ST, a discussion with Patricia Goldstone, who has been a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, has written for The Washington Post and The Economist, and is also an award-winning playwright.

On this edition of ST, a discussion with Patricia Goldstone, who has been a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, has written for The Washington Post and The Economist, and is also an award-winning playwright.