Congress

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we get to know Kojo Asamoa-Caesar, who is the Democrat running for Congress in Oklahoma's First District. As noted at his campaign website: "Asamoa-Caesar is a first-generation American, the son of a certified nursing assistant and a taxi driver who were drawn to the United States from Ghana by the call of the American Dream....

President Trump tweeted Friday morning he has Oklahoma U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe’s assurance that when the National Defense Authorization Act reaches his desk, it will not include a provision to remove confederate leaders’ names from military installations.

Inhofe confirmed to the Oklahoman he would work to remove the provision.

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Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a surprising 5-4 decision in the case of McGirt v. Oklahoma; the Court ruled that much of the eastern half of Oklahoma is still an Indian reservation. In doing so, the Court affirmed that -- because Congress had not expressly disestablished the Muskogee Creek Reservation, which was created well over a century ago -- that Reservation still exists when it comes to the Federal Major Crimes Act.

On this edition of our program, we discuss one of the cases that will be heard when the U.S. Supreme Court comes back into session next week. "Sharp v. Murphy" (previously known as "Carpenter v. Murphy") is a case that turns on whether Congress disestablished the Muscogee (Creek) Nation reservation. Although this question pertains specifically to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, the Court's decision might also end up applying to reservations of the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole Nations. Our guest is a locally based expert on this case, TU Law Professor Judith Royster.

We chat with Ian Shapiro, the Sterling Professor of Political Science and director of the MacMillan Center at Yale University. He's the co-author of a new book, "Responsible Parties: Saving Democracy from Itself," which he tells us about. The book engagingly explores why and how the form of government known as democracy has -- quite strangely and paradoxically -- reduced if not eradicated trust in political systems worldwide.

What happens when we as a society stop trusting our experts, stop consulting our longtime scholars, and stop listening to our intelligence-community professionals? What happens to our foreign policy? How are this nation's relationships with the rest of the world affected? How is our government itself altered? Our guest on ST is the conservative writer and scholar, Tom Nichols, who is also a Professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College.

On this edition of ST, we continue our series of conversations with the major candidates running to fill the open seat in Oklahoma's 1st Congressional District. Our guest is Tim Harris, a Republican, who was elected District Attorney for Tulsa County in 1998 and was, as noted at the Harris campaign website, "the longest serving DA in Tulsa County history.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we continue our series of conversations with the major candidates running to fill the open seat in Oklahoma's 1st Congressional District. Yesterday we aired a discussion with Democratic candidate Amanda Douglas; today we chat with Tim Gilpin, also a Democrat. Mr. Gilpin, as noted at his website, "has practiced law in Oklahoma since 1986. Over his career, Tim has worked in both private practice and for the State of Oklahoma.

On this edition of ST, we begin our series of interviews with the major candidates running to fill the open seat in Oklahoma's 1st Congressional District. Our guest tomorrow will be Democratic candidate Tim Gilpin; on today's program, we interview Amanda Douglas, also a Democrat. As per the Douglas campaign website: "Amanda Douglas was born and raised in Oklahoma. As one of four children in a low-income family, [she] wasn't handed a lot of opportunities in life.

Americans are less and less in agreement these days -- polarization, as we all know, has become a buzzword...and an omnipresent reality. But if there's one thing everyone agree on, it's that Washington, DC, is broken. How can it be fixed? Our guest is Joseph A. Califano, Jr., who spent thirty years in Washington at the top of the Pentagon, on the White House staff as chief domestic advisor to the President, and in the Cabinet.

The Citizens United ruling, surely among the most controversial U.S. Supreme Court decisions of the modern era, was a 5-4 vote in 2010 affirming that the freedom of speech prohibits the government from restricting independent political expenditures by nonprofit corporations, for-profit corporations, labor unions, and certain other groups. It's a ruling that, interestingly, is opposed by people all over the political spectrum: red, blue, purple, independent, libertarian, etc. On this edition of ST, we learn about a nationwide effort to render this ruling null and void.

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Two very high profile hearings took place this week on Capitol Hill. The House Intelligence Committee is investigating Russian interference in the 2016 election and the Senate Judiciary Committee is grilling President Trump’s nominee to be the next justice of the US Supreme Court. 

Get caught up and  follow the real-time coverage here with the NPR live blogs.

On this edition of ST, our guest is the bestselling novelist and philanthropist Steve Berry, who's actually in Tulsa today at the outset of a book tour; Berry's new novel, "The 14th Colony," is just out. But Berry is also visiting our community, as he tells us, in connection with his "History Matters" foundation, which is dedicated to historic preservation. This foundation, co-run by Berry and his wife, has raised more than $800,000 over the years in the name of saving historic treasures.

Our guest on ST is Lennard J. Davis, an author and scholar who is also Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts in the Departments of Disability Studies and English at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

On this installment of ST, we once again speak with policy analyst and political psychologist Steven Kull, the founder and president of a Washington-based non-partisan organization called Voice of the People. This group, which utilizes innovative polling methods and cutting-edge technology to enact an ongoing "campaign for a citizen cabinet," aims to give ordinary citizens a greater role in American government.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Representative Patrick J. Kennedy, who served several years in the U.S. House of Representatives as a congressman from Rhode Island, and who is best known as the author and lead sponsor of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008. This landmark piece of legislation provides tens of millions of Americans (who were previously denied care) with access to mental health treatment. Today, Rep.

News flash: Government is broken in Washington. Problems aren't being solved. New solutions aren't being put forward. "Compromise" (as has been so commonly observed) has become a dirty word. Or at least, such is the opinion of many of us. Indeed, poll after poll has found that a large majority of Americans believe government isn't working, and that it's -- on the contrary -- dominated by special interested and partisan gridlock. But...come to think of it...could your average American citizen do any better?

"The big problem I see in the practice of medicine today is [that] our payment scheme makes it where we violate the first rule of medicine, which is: Listen to your patient and they'll tell you what's wrong. And we don't allow anybody the time to do that anymore." So says our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa on Health, U.S. Senator Tom Coburn, a Republican who's been the junior senator from Oklahoma since January of 2005.

Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa is Robert Caro, the widely celebrated historian and biographer whose detailed, tirelessly researched writings have been awarded the Pulitzer Prize (twice), the National Book Critics Circle Award, the National Book Award, and the Francis Parkman Prize, among other honors. Tomorrow night, Tuesday the 12th, he'll deliver a Presidential Lecture in the Allen Chapman Activity Center here on the TU campus. The lecture begins at 7:30pm and is free to the public. (The Presidential Lecture Series is sponsored by TU's Darcy O'Brien Endowed Chair.) Mr.

It's hard to believe, maybe, but Election Day arrives in less than four weeks. On this edition of our show, we chat with John Olson, the Democratic candidate for Oklahoma's 1st Congressional District. Later this month, we'll hear from Craig Allen, the Independent candidate in this race.

On today's edition of our show, we speak by phone with Lawrence Lessig, who is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School and the Director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University.  A widely respected legal scholar and political activist, Lessig is known for his efforts to promote reduced legal restrictions on copyright as well as trademark laws --- particularly as these relate to the Internet and to other technology-based applications --- and for his sharp criticism of how Big Money has profoundly corrupted American politics.