Creativity

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we are pleased to share Episode 1 of Season 6 of the Museum Confidential podcast, which is a co-production of Philbrook Museum of Art and Public Radio Tulsa. (Season 6 just launched earlier this month.) This episode begins with a few basic yet far-reaching questions. What is an "outsider artist"? And do we even call them that anymore? In recent years, the term has shifted to "self-taught artist." Sounds different, but does it mean the same thing? And what about "folk art" -- when does this term apply? We chat with Dr.

The long-awaited "Smithsonian Anthology of Hip-Hop and Rap" just dropped. The box set includes 129 tracks on 9 CDs, plus a hefty 300–page book with original design by Cey Adams, the acclaimed artist and founding creative director of Def Jam Recordings. From his early days as a subway-graffiti whiz alongside Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat to designing classic album covers for Beastie Boys, LL Cool J, and many others, Adams has long been at the epicenter of hip-hop culture. He spoke to us from his studio in New York City.

Our guest is Marcello Angelini, the artistic director of Tulsa Ballet. The company will present its annual "Creations in Studio K" program -- which is devoted, as ever, to new works only -- through September 19th; the Studio K space is located at 1212 East 45th Place in Tulsa. This year's rundown includes world premieres from both Yury Yanowsky and Katarzyna Kozielska, as Angelini tells us. Also on the bill is a performance from TBII, which is the second company of Tulsa Ballet. They're offering a world premiere by the award-winning choreographer Stephanie Martinez.

Our guest is Dr. Jillian Horton, a medical educator, writer, musician, and podcaster based in Canada. As an award-winning teacher of mindfulness, she works with doctors at all stages of their careers who are dealing with guilt, grief, burnout, frustration, and/or other professional pressures. Dr.

[image via TheArtNewspaper.com]

Welcome to Season 6 of the Museum Confidential podcast, a co-production of Philbrook Museum of Art and Public Radio Tulsa. Our first episode begins with some basic yet far-reaching questions. What is an "outsider artist"? And do we even call them that anymore? In recent years, the term has shifted to "self-taught artist." Sounds different, but does it mean the same thing? And what about "folk art" -- when does this term apply? We're pleased to chat with Dr. Katherine Jentleson, the Merrie and Dan Boone Curator of Folk and Self-Taught Art at the High Museum in Atlanta.

Our guest is the acclaimed African-American artist Lonnie Holley, born in Alabama in 1950, who has three pieces now on view at Philbrook in that museum's "From the Limitations of Now" exhibit, which closes on September 5th. Known for his mixed-media and found-and-discarded-object art pieces, Holley is also an "experimental blues" musician who's made several albums. He will perform with his band tomorrow night (Friday the 3rd) at Philbrook's garden space, beginning at 7pm.

(Note: This interview first aired back in March.) Our guest is Kevin Brockmeier, an imaginative and acclaimed writer based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Photo via Corian.com

Ever happen to look at a painting on the wall of some hospital and wonder: "Who chose THIS picture? And why is it hanging HERE?" Our guest on ST Medical Monday is the London-based writer Lou Stoppard, who writes about style, trends, and culture for The New Yorker Magazine and other publications.

"Goldenrod: Poems"

Jul 28, 2021

Our guest is the Ohio-based, award-winning writer and poet Maggie Smith, whose latest book of poems has recently been released. It's called "Goldenrod." It's the first book to appear from Smith since her bestselling memoir, "Keep Moving: Notes on Loss, Creativity, and Change." Like the best of Smith's earlier verse, the poems in "Goldenrod" look carefully and engagingly at the experiences of daily life -- both the mundane and the magical -- in order to affirm, celebrate, lament, and/or investigate the human experience.

On this edition of our program, we learn about the 2021 Art 365 program from the nonprofit Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition (OVAC). The artists whose work appears in this very competitive year-long program were chosen by guest curator, Grace Deveney, the associate curator of Prospect.5 in New Orleans. She's our guest today, along with Alexa Goetzinger, the associate director of OVAC. The artists selected for this year's OVAC 365 exhibit are Ginnie Baer (Edmond), Crystal Z.

Photo Credit: Jae Man Joo

From tonight (the 17th) through Saturday night (the 19th), Choregus Productions will present its 2021 Summer Heat International Dance Festival. Three world-class companies will perform at the Tulsa Performing Arts Center; more details on the festival, including how to get tickets, are here. Our guest on ST is the choreographer Dwight Rhoden, whose NYC-based Complexions Contemporary Ballet is a company known for its groundbreaking combination of methods, styles, and cultures.

On this edition of ST, we look into the upcoming Tulsa Chautauqua 2021, a virtual festival happening next week (June 8th through the 12th) on the theme of "20th Century Visionaries: Catalysts for Change." For this series of events -- which will be presented this year in an online-only format -- five different scholar/performers will offer entertaining and educational presentations and workshops on the lives of Gene Rodenberry, Gertrude Bell, Marshall McLuhan, Marie Curie, and Frank Lloyd Wright.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Prof. Sean Latham, the Pauline McFarlin Walter Endowed Chair of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Tulsa, where he also serves as editor of the James Joyce Quarterly, founding director of the Oklahoma Center for the Humanities, and director of the TU Institute for Bob Dylan Studies. In this last-named capacity, Prof.

Our guest on ST is Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, a professor of internet governance and regulation at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. He's also a faculty affiliate of the Belfer Center of Science and International Affairs at Harvard. Mayer-Schönberger joins us to talk about "Framers: Human Advantage in an Age of Technology and Turmoil," a new book for which he's a co-author.

Photo by Jeremy Charles

We're glad to welcome back to our program the Tulsa-based guitarist, composer, and music producer Chris Combs, who's known for his work with COMBSY, Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey, and other jazz/experimental/multi-genre outfits. Combs tells us about (and shares tracks from) his forthcoming album, "Roche Blave: Large Ensemble Works Recorded Live in Switzerland," which will be released by the nonprofit Horton Records on April 30th.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Carolyn Sickles, the Executive Director of Tulsa Artist Fellowship, or TAF, which is an arts-and-community-focused project of the George Kaiser Family Foundation. The TAF recently announced that it has given 22 of its fellows an Arts Integration Award for 2020-2021, which is meant to help these artists further their involvement with (and presence within) the Tulsa community via new works, new series, and so on. The award includes a $25,000 stipend, $10,000 in project resources, and also free living and work spaces.

We are pleased to welcome Joy Harjo back to StudioTulsa. The poet, writer, performer, and musician is the current United State Poet Laureate. She's also a Tulsa resident, and a Tulsa Artist Fellow. A member of the Mvskoke/Creek Nation, she started writing as a young woman and started playing saxophone in her forties -- by now, she's well-regarded and widely celebrated in both capacities. Harjo joins us to discuss her new album, "I Pray for My Enemies," which is the first new recording of her music to appear in a decade.

Our guest on StudioTulsa is the well-regarded African-American composer Adolphus Hailstork, who is based in Virginia. His music will be part of the program for a special broadcast-only concert to be presented by the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra on Saturday (the 27th) at 8pm -- with a re-airing on Sunday (the 28th) at 4pm. This concert will be a celebration of Black History Month, and it will air on our sister-station, Classical 88.7 KWTU-FM. More details are posted here.

Our guest is longtime Tulsa resident Jane Mudgett, a well-respected local leader and businesswoman who's also a certified coach, a trainer, and a partner at the Exceptional Leaders Lab. She joins us to talk about her book, which first appeared earlier this year.

Photo by Melissa Lukenbaugh

Update:  Statement from the University of Tulsa School of Art, Design, and Art History

The gallery is open to TU Students, Faculty, and Staff Only and is Not Open to the Public.

While we are not open to the public, please join us Thursdays in September at the University of Tulsa School of Art, Design, and Art History Facebook and Instagram pages for special virtual programs and highlights.  

On this edition of ST, we learn about a multi-artist, multi-media exhibition opening soon at Living Arts of Tulsa called "Speak: Speak While You Can." The show gathers works by several outstanding Native American artists, all of the creations focused on various indigenous/tribal langauges. Our guests are the co-curators of this show, both of them noted Native artists in their own right: Tony A. Tiger (Sac & Fox/Seminole/Muscogee) and Bobby C. Martin (Muscogee/Creek).

Image courtesy Andy Arkley.

On this edition of ST, we learn about THE EXPERIENCE: IMAGINE, which is a newly created group exhibition opening today (Friday the 7th) at ahha Tulsa. It's a rather Outer Space (or Sci-Fi, or Other Worldly) type of show that, per the ahha website, features "large-scale, semi-permanent, interactive art. When you visit THE EXPERIENCE: IMAGINE, you will explore zones designed and built by one of six Tulsa-based artists. Each has different interactive elements.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Bon Ku, an ER doc and Assistant Dean for Health and Design at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University. Dr. Ku is also the co-author of a new book, "Health Design Thinking: Creating Products and Services for Better Health." This novel and fascinating work argues that the principles of human-centered design can and should be applied to today's health care challenges. The book's focal points range from the design of drug packaging and exam rooms to the use of internet-connected devices for early detection of breast cancer. As Dr.

(Note: This program first aired last year.) Our guest is the Kansas City-based poet and teacher Anne Boyer, who joins us to discuss her bold, well-written memoir of cancer.

It's well-known that Oklahoma has the highest rate of female incarceration in the US. On this edition of StudioTulsa, we profile Poetic Justice, an important nonprofit that, per its website, aims to "reveal the individuality and experiences of the women who inhabit [our] state's prisons.

On this edition of ST, we learn about Tulsa Remote, the talent-recruitment initiative of George Kaiser Family Foundation that's now in its second year -- and that has received, since it began, more than 10,000 applications from all over the globe (and all over the nation). Our guest is Tulsa native Aaron Bolzle, the executive director of this increasingly popular program.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we welcome the Tulsa-based composer, musician, and music teacher Noam Faingold back to our show. He's also the curator for the fifth-annual OK Electric Festival of Electroacoustic Music, which he tells us about. This special event (presented by Living Arts of Tulsa) happens tonight, Thursday the 5th, at Duet Jazz; more info, including how to get tickets, is posted here.

Our guest is the well-known, New York-based graphic artist, Luba Lukova. Her bold, accessible images have appeared in The New York Times, Time, and other leading publications, and her prints and posters are also in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Denver Art Museum, and the Library of Congress. She is currently a J. Donald Feagin Visiting Artist here at TU, and an exhibit of her socially-aware work, "Luba Lukova: Designing Justice," will soon go on view at the Henry Zarrow Center for Art & Education in downtown Tulsa.

On this edition of ST, we learn about two 2019 Ruth Mayo Memorial Distinguished Visiting Artists here at TU, the painters Gideon Bok and Meghan Brady. They're based in Maine, and they also happen to be married. And their duo exhibit, "Being There," will open this evening (the 7th) at a special lecture/reception at the Alexandre Hogue Gallery on the TU campus. More info is poste here.

Our guest is William Doyle, a bestselling author and TV producer for networks including HBO, The History Channel, and PBS. Doyle is the co-author of an important new education-focused study, which he tells us about. The book is called "Let the Children Play: How More Play Will Save Our Schools and Help Children Thrive." As was noted of this work by Michael Rich, an associate professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School: "Sahlberg and Doyle whack us in the head with the reality that 21st-century skills require old-fashioned learning as children.

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