Dating and Relationships

Our guest is Kayleen Schaefer, a journalist and author who has written for The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and other publications. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "But You're Still So Young: How Thirtysomethings Are Redefining Adulthood." The book looks carefully at how thirtysomethings in America today are -- and aren't -- meeting the milestones which sociologists commonly cite as the five markers of adulthood: finishing school, leaving home, marriage, gaining financial independence, and having kids.

Our guest is Dr. Ina Park, who's an associate professor at the University of California San Francisco School of Medicine, a Medical Consultant at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Division of STD Prevention), and the Medical Director of the California Prevention Training Center.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, our guest is F. Diane Barth, a longtime psychotherapist based in New York City. She joins us to discuss her new book, "I Know How You Feel: The Joy and Heartbreak of Friendship in Women's Lives." As was noted of this readable and useful study by Kirkus Reviews: "A psychotherapist offers advice about how to be, and keep, a friend. Barth, whose Psychology Today blog frequently focuses on women's friendships, draws on interviews with diverse women to examine the 'magical, meaningful, and surprisingly difficult' connections they make with friends.

Our guest is Dr. Daphne de Marneffe, a noted clinical psychologist in the San Francisco Bay Area who has counseled couples and individuals for decades. Her new book, "The Rough Patch," aims to help married people both locate and maintain a union that promotes compatibility between an individual person's development and the often relentless demands of a two-person relationship. As was noted by Booklist, this volume is "densely packed with de Marneffe’s extensive knowledge of human emotional development and the parent-child relationships that affect us from birth....

On this installment of our show, an in-depth discussion with the novelist Tom Perrotta, whose books include "Election" and "Little Children" (both of which were made into well-regarded films). Perrotta has a new novel out, titled "Mrs. Fletcher," and he tells us about it on today's program. As was noted of this book in a front-page appreciation in The New York Times Book Review: "[This book], Perrotta's seventh novel and first since 2011's "The Leftovers," operates and succeeds in ways that will be pleasingly familiar to his admirers.

On this edition of ST, we are pleased to welcome the noted book critic, editor, and retired librarian Nancy Pearl back to our show. A former Tulsan, she's also the longtime book reviewer for this program, and she can be heard talking about books from time to time on NPR's Morning Edition. Nancy has a new novel out -- it's her first, and it's called "George and Lizzie" -- and it was thus praised by Booklist (in a starred review): "Pearl dramatizes a complicated and deeply illuminating union of opposites and conducts profound inquiries into the self, family, empathy, and love.

On this edition of ST, a conversation with Miranda July, the noted filmmaker, writer, and performance artist.

(Please note: This show originally aired in October of last year.) Our guest is Kristin Russo, who -- along with her colleague, Danielle Owens-Reid -- communicates daily with LGBTQ youth and families at the award-winning website called Everyone Is Gay. Russo and Owens-Reid have a book out that stems directly from this website; it's called "This Is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids: A Question & Answer Guide to Everyday Life," and Russo talks with us about it.