Death Penalty

There’s a national shortage of the drugs used to treat COVID-19 patients in ICU beds, and a group of out-of-state doctors penned a letter asking Oklahoma to share its supply with local hospitals.

It’s unclear how many people could be treated with Oklahoma’s supply, but the state plans to use two of the drugs listed in the doctors’ letter to put prisoners to death.

The drugs were originally designed for medical use. The doctors say they can be used to subdue Covid-19 patients who need to be hooked up to ventilators.

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview from January of this year. At that time, we spoke with David R. Dow, a professor of law at the University of Houston Law Center and an internationally recognized figure in the fight against the death penalty. Dow discusses his latest book, a memoir entitled "Things I've Learned from Dying: A Book About Life." You can learn more about this interview --- and can hear all of it as a free, on-demand "stream" --- at this link.

Our guest is David R. Dow, a professor of law at the University of Houston Law Center and an internationally recognized figure in the fight against the death penalty. Dow is also the founder and director of the Texas Innocence Network; he has represented more than 100 death row inmates in their state and federal appeals.

Oklahoma Department of Corrections

McALESTER, Okla. (AP) — An Oklahoma man has been put to death in connection with an armed robbery nearly 37 years ago.

Michael Selsor was executed Tuesday for the shooting death of 55-year-old Clayton Chandler, a Tulsa convenience store manager.

Selsor was pronounced dead at 6:06 p.m. Tuesday after he was given a dose of lethal drugs at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary.

[Aired on Monday, February 27th.] On today's show, we speak with Kelly Kurt, a former AP reporter and freelance writer here in Tulsa whose article, "Death's Yellow Door," is the cover story in the current issue of This Land.