Digital Technology

Our guest for this installment of Found@TU is Dr. Erin Iski, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry here at the University of Tulsa. She describes her research in nanoscale surface chemistry, in which she uses an innovative Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) to study the interaction of atoms and molecules on surfaces. Dr.

We at KWGS are pleased to post a new episode in our monthly Found@TU podcast series, in which various University of Tulsa faculty members discuss their research in a clear, accessible, and engaging manner. Our guest this time around is Dr. Akhilesh Bajaj, the Chapman Professor of Computer Information Systems here at TU, who talks with us about his research on the advantages and disadvantages of customizing (rather than using off-the-shelf) information systems in an organization.

Our guest is Dr. Akhilesh Bajaj, the Chapman Professor of Computer Information Systems here at TU, who talks with us about his research on the advantages and disadvantages of customizing (rather than using off-the-shelf) information systems in an organization. He also outlines the recent history of office automation, explains what blockchains are, and describes how artificial intelligence is poised to (fairly soon!) transform the world. For more about Dr. Bajaj’s research, please visit abajaj.net.

Our guest is the Yale- and Cambridge-trained space archaeologist, Egyptologist, and satellite-imagery pioneer, Sarah Parcak. She's known for employing infrared imaging -- i.e., hi-tech images captured by a satellite orbiting the Earth -- in order to locate thousands of undiscovered archaeological sites worldwide. Dr. Parcak is also known for developing the ongoing GlobalXplorer project, which is an online community whereby "citizen scientists" can assist in the search for lost civilizations.

Our guest is Anne Helen Petersen, who is a Senior Culture Writer and Western Correspondent for BuzzFeed News. She's known for writing long-form pieces that skillfully bridge the domains of academia and journalism; indeed, Peterson holds a PhD in media studies from UT-Austin, where she studied the history of the gossip industry. She'll be speaking tonight (Thursday the 28th) on the TU campus; the lecture is free to all and begins at 5:30pm. Peterson's remarks will be drawn from her most recent book, "Too Fat, Too Slutty, Too Loud: The Rise and Reign of the Unruly Woman."

Our guest is the well-known hacker, inventor, entrepreneur, and technology futurist, Pablos Holman. An internationally recognized expert in 3D printing, artificial intelligence, big data, robotics, automated manufacturing, and cryptocurrency, Holman has contributed to our vision of tomorrow in a way that few others have. At The Intellectual Ventures Lab, he's worked on a brain-surgery tool, a machine to suppress hurricanes, 3D food printers, and a laser that can shoot down mosquitos (in order to help eradicate malaria).

Our guest on StudioTulsa is a Wharton professor and tech entrepreneur whose new book examines how algorithms and artificial intelligence are starting to run just about every single aspect of our lives.

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Our guest is John Brennan, the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency, where he served from 2013 to 2017. Previously a deputy national security advisor and assistant to President Barack Obama for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, Brennan today speaks to various audiences about how to both think of and respond to global events, terrorism, and cybersecurity concerns.

(Note: This interview first aired late last year.) Our guest is Leslie Berlin, who is the Project Historian for the Silicon Valley Archives at Stanford University. Originally from Tulsa, Berlin has a book out that offers nothing less than the history of Silicon Valley. As was noted of this book by The New York Times: "[A] deeply researched and dramatic narrative of Silicon Valley's early years.... Meticulously told stories permit the reader to gain a nuanced understanding of the emergence of the broader technology ecosystem that has enabled Silicon Valley to thrive....

On this edition of our program, we learn about "The Bleeding Edge," a new documentary film that recently started airing on Netflix. This film, directed by Kirby Dick, offers a detailed and unsettling look at the unforeseen consequences of various advanced technological devices that are routinely used by Big Medical today. Our guest is the producer of this film, Amy Herdy, who has worked in film -- specializing in social justice issues -- for more than twenty years.

Our guest is Daniel Wilson, the bestselling sci-fi writer and Tulsa native (and TU alum) whose latest novel, just out in paperback, is "The Clockwork Dynasty." (Note that we spoke with Wilson last summer, when this book was first being published.) As was noted of this novel in The Los Angeles Review of Books: "Wilson is one of the foremost prophets of the near future.... In 'The Clockwork Dynasty,' the irrepressibly readable Wilson has retreated to pseudo-vampiric sentient robots.

On this edition of ST, a conversation with Jaime Casap, the so-called "Education Evangelist" at Google. Casap will be the keynote speaker at the Tulsa Regional Chamber's annual State of Education gathering, happening tomorrow (Wednesday the 6th) at the Renaissance Tulsa Hotel and Convention Center on South 107th East Avenue.

(Please note: This show first aired back in December.) Artificial "machine" intelligence is, of course, a part of our lives now -- we have cruise control in our cars, automatic checkout services at the supermarket, and (most importantly?) those smartphones in our pockets. But what will life be like when artificial "sentient" intelligence becomes the norm? And when will that happen?

On this installment of StudioTulsa, our guest is the well-regarded cyber security expert, Susan Landau of Tufts University. She will soon give the 2018 Graves Cyber Security Distinguished Lecture here at TU; her talk begins at 7pm tomorrow night (the 8th) in the Alan Chapman Student Union. Her talk carries the same title as her latest book, "Listening In: Cyber Security in an Insecure Age." As Prof.

If our machines are getting smarter and smarter, and if they are doing more and more work, then what happens to the, well, human facet of the workplace? On this installment of ST, we listen back to an interview from July. At that time, we spoke with Edward D.

Artificial "machine" intelligence is, of course, a part of our lives now -- we have cruise control in our cars, automatic checkout services at the supermarket, and (most importantly?) those smartphones in our pockets. But what will life be like when artificial "sentient" intelligence becomes the norm? And when will that happen? On this edition of ST, we're talking about various AI-related matters with Amir Husain, an inventor and computer scientist whose new book is called "The Sentient Machine: The Coming Age of Artificial Intelligence." As was noted of this book by Prof.

Our guest is Leslie Berlin, who is the Project Historian for the Silicon Valley Archives at Stanford University. Originally from Tulsa, Berlin has a new book out that offers nothing less than the history of Silicon Valley. As was noted of this book by The New York Times: "[A] deeply researched and dramatic narrative of Silicon Valley's early years.... Meticulously told stories permit the reader to gain a nuanced understanding of the emergence of the broader technology ecosystem that has enabled Silicon Valley to thrive....

On this edition of ST, we get an update on the Kravis Discovery Center at the Gilcrease Museum here in Tulsa. Located in the museum’s lower level, the Center recently underwent an extensive renovation in order to create a more interactive, more tech-driven -- and thus more "21st century" -- experience. Our guest is Dr. Bob Pickering, a Professor of Anthropology here at TU as well as a Senior Curator at Gilcrease.

Since 2012, the national non-profit organization Girls Who Code has taught computing and computer-programming skills to thousands of girls all across America. Our guest is the CEO and founder of that organization, Reshma Saujani, who has a new book out.

Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Daniel Wilson, the bestselling sci-fi writer and Tulsa native (and TU alum) whose new novel, just out, is called "The Clockwork Dynasty." (Please note that Wilson will soon be reading from this book, and signing copies of it, at a Book Smart Tulsa event here in our community.) As was noted of this novel in The Los Angeles Review of Books: "Wilson is one of the foremost prophets of the near future.... In 'The Clockwork Dynasty,' the irrepressibly readable Wilson has retreated to pseudo-vampiric sentient robots.

On this edition of our show, an interesting if rather unsettling discussion with Edward D. Hess, who is a co-author of the newly released book, "Humility Is the New Smart: Rethinking Human Excellence in the Smart Machine Age." As was noted of this volume in a detailed appreciation posted at the online San Francisco Review of Books: "What will be the percentage of jobs that technology will replace in the United States during the next two decades? Estimates vary but not that much. There seems to be a consensus: a range of 45 to 50% between now and 2037.

(Note: This program originally aired last year.) Is technology taking over and/or fundamentally changing and/or worsening our lives? It's a debatable question...or series of questions...but, for whatever it's worth, there ARE more and more books and novels and TV shows these days in which technological devices are taking over, changing, or even, yes, worsening our lives as human beings.

On this installment of ST, we listen back to our chat from last fall with David Burkus, a well-respected expert on business and management practices who's also a bestselling author, an in-demand speaker, and an associate professor of management at Oral Roberts University.

Dylan went electric. Miles went electric. Everyone, it seems, has gone electric by now...but what about the world of classical music? How common is it to witness, say, an "amp'd up" chamber music trio? On this edition of ST, our guest is the noted Tulsa-based composer, musician, and music educator, Noam Faingold, who's also the curator of the upcoming OK Electric music festival. This festival will happen Friday and Saturday night, the 28th and 29th, at Living Arts of Tulsa.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we listen back to a fascinating show from January. At that time, we spoke with author Adam Tanner about his then-new book, "Our Bodies, Our Data: How Companies Make Billions Selling Our Medical Records." As was noted of this volume by Kirkus Reviews: "[This is] a disturbing look at the threat to privacy created by the lucrative and growing health care data-mining industry. In his previous book...[Tanner] took a broad look at the enterprises that gather and sell computer-generated data on consumers.

We are joined on ST today by Dr. Roger Mailler, an Associate Professor of Computer Science with the Tandy School of Computer Science at the University of Tulsa. He's also the director of the Computational Neuroscience and Adaptive Systems (CNAS) lab here at TU, which focuses on various biological and artificial systems that adapt in order to solve problems. Dr. Mailer tells us about the Heartland Gaming Expo 2017, which he created, and which will happen this weekend (April 8th and 9th) at the Reynolds Center on the TU campus.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, we speak with author Adam Tanner, who is a writer in residence at Harvard University's Institute for Quantitative Social Science. Tanner joins us to discuss his new book, "Our Bodies, Our Data: How Companies Make Billions Selling Our Medical Records." As was noted of this volume by Kirkus Reviews: "[This is] a disturbing look at the threat to privacy created by the lucrative and growing health care data-mining industry.

On this edition of ST, a discussion of Russian hacking attempts worldwide, of cyber-attacks on the DNC that were meant to affect the 2016 Presidential Election, and of related news stories. And we'll also discuss, in more detail, what might be seen as the hi-tech precursor to these stories -- that is, the Soviet Union's longtime efforts to create a kind of national internet...long before the internet itself actually existed.

Is technology taking over and/or fundamentally changing and/or worsening our lives? It's a debatable question...or series of questions...but, for whatever it's worth, there do seem to be more and more books and novels and TV shows these days in which technological devices are taking over, fundamentally changing, or even, yes, worsening our lives as human beings.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Laleh Mehran, a Denver-based multi-disciplinary artist who moved to the United States from Iran when she was a child in the 1970s. Her art work explores cultures and locations, ideas and identities, patterns and shapes -- and it seems especially focused on issues of technology, geography, and media. Her striking pieces have been shown/installed over the years -- both individually and in group shows -- in Holland, Germany, Italy, Massachusetts, Oregon, Pittsburgh, and elsewhere.

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