Diversity Issues

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Ade Adamson, a board-certified dermatologist and assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the newly created Dell Medical School at UT-Austin. As noted at this "bio" page from the UT-Austin website, where you can also access a list of Dr. Adamson's articles: "His primary clinical interest is in caring for patients at high risk for melanoma of the skin, such as those with many moles (particularly atypical moles) or a personal and/or family history of melanoma.

Our guest is Dr. Amir Hussain of Loyola Marymount University. He'll be speaking tomorrow night (Friday the 20th) at Philbrook Museum of Art here in Tulsa in connection with that museum's soon-to-close exhibit, "Wondrous Worlds: Art & Islam Through Time & Place." Dr. Hussain's remarks will be derived from his book, "Muslims and the Making of America," which explores everything from Muslims who fought in the Civil War to the cultural icon (and sports legend) Muhammad Ali.

(Note: This show first aired earlier this year.) The acclaimed journalist and bestselling author Daniel Okrent is our guest; he tells us about his book, "The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics, and the Law That Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants Out of America." This book looks back to the 1920s is reveal a dark, forgotten chapter of American history -- a troubling era with serious implications for the present day.

In 2013, Dr. Ayaz Virji left a comfortable job at an East Coast hospital and moved to a medical facility in a small town in Minnesota; he felt personally driven -- indeed, he felt called -- to address the dire shortage of doctors in rural America. But in 2016, his choice to relocate was tested when the reliably blue and working-class county where he lived swung for Donald Trump. Leading up to and following Trump's election, Dr. Virji  was shocked to suddenly see his children facing anti-Muslim remarks at school.

The acclaimed journalist and bestselling author Daniel Okrent is our guest; he tells us about his new book, "The Guarded Gate: Bigotry, Eugenics, and the Law That Kept Two Generations of Jews, Italians, and Other European Immigrants Out of America." This book looks back to the 1920s is reveal a dark and forgotten chapter of American history -- a troubling era with serious implications for the present day.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in January.) Our guest is Dr. Duane Bidwell, a  professor of practical theology, spiritual care, and counseling at Claremont School of Theology in California. He tells us about his book, "When One Religion Isn't Enough: The Lives of Spiritually Fluid People." This timely volume, named a Best Book of 2018 by Library Journal, looks closely and respectfully at the lives of people who embrace two or more religious traditions.

Our guest is Mitchell S. Jackson, whose new book is an autobiographical collection of essays called "Survival Math: Notes on an All-American Family." As was noted by The Boston Globe, it's a "vibrant memoir of race, violence, family, and manhood.... Jackson recognizes there is too much for one conventional form, and his various storytelling methods imbue the book with an unpredictable dexterity. It is sharp and unshrinking in depictions of his life, his relatives (blood kin and otherwise), and his Pacific Northwest hometown, which serves as both inescapable character and villain....

Our guest on StudioTulsa is Tamara Lebak, a Tulsa-based executive coach, organizational development consultant, and minister. She's also an accomplsihed singer-songwriter in the folk/roots/blues/alt-country manner, and she joins us to discuss her new album: "The Psalms Project: Volume 1." As Lebak has written of herself and her music online: "I'm a Universalist minister who believes that the Bible is ultimately about the relentless and persistent love of God.

On this edition of ST, we speak by phone with Deborah Rhode, the Director of the Center on the Legal Profession and the E.W. McFarland Professor of Law at Stanford Law School. Prof. Rhode will give the free-to-the-public Buck Colbert Franklin Memorial Civil Rights Lecture on Thursday of this week (the 13th) at 6pm in the John Rogers Hall on the University of Tulsa campus. (There will be a pre-lecture reception at 5:30pm in the mezzanine of John Rogers Hall; you'll find more details about this event here.) Prof.