Domestic Violence

Cherokee Nation

Cherokee Nation on Thursday opened a new Tahlequah facility for its ONE FIRE Victims Services program, corresponding with the beginning of Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

"Our move to our new facility is going to be great for us," said interim director Shawna Duch. "We've got a more secure location, we've got a bigger location, we've got an office that looks like home. It's going to be comfortable for a survivor to come in and get services here."

Chris Polansky / KWGS News

This story was updated at 6:18 a.m. on Friday, March 19th, to include a statement from Rep. Markwayne Mullin received after initial publication.

The often-united, all-G.O.P. Oklahoma delegation to the U.S. House of Representatives diverged on Wednesday, with three of five representatives breaking ranks to join Democrats in voting to renew the Violence Against Women Act. 

Reps. Stephanie Bice, Markwayne Mullin and Tom Cole were among just 29 House Republicans to vote for the reauthorization of the 1994 law.

(Note: This interview first aired in September of 2020.) Our guest is Rachel Louise Snyder, an award-winning journalist and professor of creative writing and journalism at American University. She talks about her latest book, which is "No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us." As was noted of this widely-acclaimed study by The Washington Post: "Compulsively readable.... In a writing style that's as gripping as good fiction, as intimate as memoir, and deeply informed, [Snyder] takes us into the lives of the abused, the abusers, and the survivors....

Our guest is Rachel Louise Snyder, an award-winning journalist and professor of creative writing and journalism at American University. She talks about her newest book, which is just out in paperback; the book is "No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us." As was noted of this widely-acclaimed study by The Washington Post: "Compulsively readable.... In a writing style that's as gripping as good fiction, as intimate as memoir, and deeply informed, [Snyder] takes us into the lives of the abused, the abusers, and the survivors....

Matt Trotter / KWGS

The U.S. Department of Justice is sending money to Oklahoma to combat domestic violence.

"Oklahoma is receiving more than $8 million in domestic violence grants that are going to go to assist victims of domestic violence, to support recovery and to help us end this cycle of violence," said U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Oklahoma Trent Shores.

Tribes, cities and nonprofits offering services to survivors are in line for funding.

DVIS

Statistics in Tulsa support the notion that the incidence of domestic violence is up during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Domestic Violence Intervention Services reported a 22% increase in crisis line calls the first six months of the year compared to the same period in 2019, and Tulsa Police handled 192 more domestic violence calls from January through July 2020 than in the same span of 2019.

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — A presidential task force charged with coming up with ways to address missing and slain Native Americans will resume tribal listening sessions Wednesday.

The task force held a handful of sessions in person with tribes and tribal organizations before the coronavirus hit. It’s now turning to teleconferences and webinars to update tribes on its work and get feedback.

Four sessions are scheduled through June 3.

Our guest on this installment of StudioTulsa is Brenda Tracy, a registered nurse who's based in Oregon. Tracy speaks often about sexual assault and physical violence on America's college campuses. In 1998, while she was a student at Oregon State, she was gang raped by four men -- two of whom were Oregon State football players. For many years afterward, as we learn on today's show, Tracy did not speak publicly about this devastating personal tragedy.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, we speak by phone with Kim Garrett, the executive director and founder of Palomar, the nonprofit Oklahoma City Family Justice Center, which opened its doors earlier this year and has already aided thousands of people. Drawing on the resources of hundreds of professionals and volunteers, Palomar helps OKC-area victims of violence -- that is, individuals from all walsk of life and their children -- by offering protection, hope, and healing in a single location; some 14 different organizations are all based on-site at Palomar.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we learn about the nonprofit Family Safety Center, which is located in the basement of the downtown Tulsa Police Station.

On this edition of ST, we speak with Dr. Lawrence Aber, the Willner Family Professor of Psychology and Public Policy at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University, where he is also a University Professor. Dr. Aber is an internationally respected expert on child development, poverty, psychology, and how all of these relate to social policy.

Credit Matt Trotter / KWGS

On this edition of ST, we speak with two outstanding local citizens who were among the ten women recently given the Women of the Year - Pinnacle Award from the YWCA Tulsa collaboration with the Mayor'’s Commission on the Status of Women. Earlier this week, Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett presented these awards in person, and in doing so recognized how each of this year's recipients has worked to eliminate racism and/or empower women.

Several studies have shown links existing between acts of cruelty toward animals and violence toward human beings -- and it's hardly surprising that 31 states in the U.S. as well as the District of Columbia now recommend (or else mandate) judges to require counseling for persons convicted of animal cruelty. The aforesaid "links" -- and working to end both of these crimes -- are what we're discussing on today's ST. AniCare of Oklahoma, a local grassroots group sponsored by the nonprofit Oklahoma Alliance for Animals, will soon host a two-day AniCare Seminar here in Tulsa.