Donald Trump

Our show today focuses on a newly publsihed book that's widely seen as the definitive journalistic account of former President Trump's final year in office. The book is "I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump's Catastrophic Final Year," and it's written by Philip Rucker and Carol Leonnig, the Pulitzer-Prize winning Washington Post reporters who earlier gave us "A Very Stable Genius." Rucker is our guest on StudioTulsa.

Edward-Isaac Dovere is our guest. He is a staff writer for The Atlantic and its lead political correspondent. He's covered Democratic politics for 15 years, beginning in his native New York City and carrying him through the Obama White House...and then across the nation during the 2020 election cycle. Dovere joins us to discuss his new book, "Battle for the Soul: Inside the Democrats' Campaigns to Defeat Trump." As was noted by a critic in The Guardian: "Essential reading....

Chris Polansky / KWGS News

Tulsa is preparing for its second consecutive June featuring thousands of visitors, demonstrations and a visit from the President of the United States, and the head of the city's police force said Wednesday they're better prepared from having experienced it last year.

Rep. Liz Cheney

Update (12:12 p.m., Wednesday, May 12): This story and its headline were updated following a statement from Rep. Stephanie Bice received after initial publication.

Trump Campaign

A plan to dedicate a stretch of state highway in Cimarron County "President Donald J. Trump Highway" hit a speed bump this week.

With an omnibus highway dedication bill up for a floor vote, Oklahoma City Democratic Sens. Kay Floyd and Carri Hicks pointed out under state law, most people must have been dead three years before they’re honored with a highway dedication.

The White House

While the COVID-19 pandemic continues its gradual improvement nation- and statewide, Oklahoma remains in the top ten for all four metrics the White House uses to measure outbreak severity.

Courtesy

The PGA Championship is headed back to Southern Hills next year, the Oklahoma course that gets its eighth major championship earlier than expected after the PGA of America cut ties with former President Donald Trump.

Oklahoma Democratic Party

Leaders of the Oklahoma Democratic Party said Wednesday they were elated and moved by watching the inauguration of President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris. 

"We are celebrating this with jubilation," said party chair Alicia Andrews on a Zoom press conference. "Today, we saw the ushering in of a hope personified by President Biden and Vice President Harris."

Office of Sen. Jim Inhofe

Oklahoma's senior U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe said in a Tuesday statement that he will not join fellow Republican Okla. Sen. James Lankford and other Republicans in objecting to the certification of Democratic President-elect Joe Biden's victory in a joint session of Congress on Wednesday.

Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — The unprecedented Republican effort to overturn the presidential election has been condemned by an outpouring of current and former GOP officials warning the effort to sow doubt in Joe Biden’s win and keep President Donald Trump in office is undermining Americans’ faith in democracy.

Our guest is Dan Alexander, a senior editor at Forbes Magazine, who joins us to discuss his new book, "White House, Inc." It's an in-depth investigation into President Trump's business holdings, and into how he used the highest office in the land to enrich these holdings. In order to document the president's endeavors to make money from his office, the book examines his exclusive clubs, luxury hotels, overseas partnerships, commercial properties, and personal mansions.

Twitter / @realdonaldtrump

Tulsa came up in Thursday's White House press briefing.

"The health department director in Tulsa has said President Trump's rally there likely contributed to a big surge in coronavirus cases in the area. Does the president now regret holding that rally?" said The Guardian's David Smith.

"So, we have not seen data to reflect that, and no, we do not regret holding the rally," said White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany.

Twitter / @realdonaldtrump

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A journalist who attended President Donald Trump’s rally in Tulsa last week said Friday he has tested positive for COVID-19.

Oklahoma Watch reporter Paul Monies said he was notified Friday of his positive diagnosis.

Odell Architecture

At a special meeting of the Tulsa Public Facilities Authority (TPFA) held virtually on Tuesday, an executive from the company that manages the BOK Center said they will not book or sign contracts for any further events without clear guidelines.

"Our intention is not to book any additional events, or contract with any additional event organizers, until we have some policies or guidance from the TPFA and perhaps even other local officials, including the public health director," said Doug Thornton, an executive vice president at ASM Global.

Facebook / Tulsa Police Department

Responding to comments from a Trump campaign official that "local law enforcement" was partially responsible for a smaller than expected crowd at the BOK Center Saturday for President Donald Trump's reelection rally, the Tulsa Police Department issued a statement describing only a short interruption.

MSNBC

Calling Sheila Buck's nationally televised arrest outside the BOK Center on Saturday an "outrage," the American Civil Liberties Union of Oklahoma has called for charges to be dropped.

Buck, a Tulsa teacher, was wearing an "I Can't Breathe" t-shirt when, according to a statement from the Tulsa Police Department, the Trump campaign requested she be removed. Buck claimed to hold a ticket to the rally.

Chris Polansky / KWGS News

With wildly different attendance numbers being reported by the Tulsa Fire Department -- 6,200 -- and the Trump campaign -- 12,000 -- for Saturday's rally, Mayor G.T. Bynum said Monday that the true number is likely somewhere in the middle.

"I want to put an asterisk on the fire marshal's designation, because that does not include people that were in suites in the BOK Center or staff that were there," Bynum said in an interview with KRMG Radio. "So clearly it's somewhere in between those numbers."

Chris Polansky / KWGS News

Speaking just minutes after the director of the Tulsa Health Department reiterated his belief that the president's reelection rally this week should be postponed due to surging coronavirus numbers in Oklahoma and Tulsa County, Mayor G.T. Bynum said at a press conference Wednesday that while he can't guarantee anyone's safety, he will not act to prevent the rally from taking place.

Dr. Jabraan Pasha, University of Oklahoma Medical Center

Calling it a matter of public health, not politics, hundreds of health care providers have signed their names on a letter to Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum, calling on him to prevent President Trump's campaign rally planned for the BOK Center on Saturday.

Don't Ask Tulsa's Mayor About Trump Rally Plans

Jun 16, 2020

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — For most mayors in deep-red states like Oklahoma, the prospect of hosting the first rally for President Donald Trump in months would be a delight. It would showcase the city on an international stage and draw revenue for local businesses that have been shuttered for months amid the coronavirus outbreak.

 

Tulsa Health Department

One week before President Donald Trump is scheduled to host a campaign rally at Tulsa's BOK Center, local and national health experts are warning that large indoor gatherings have the potential to further worsen the still-growing COVID-19 pandemic. 

Our guest on ST is James Poniewozik, the chief TV critic at The New York Times. He joins us to discuss his widely hailed new book, "Audience of One: Donald Trump, Television, and the Fracturing of America." As was noted of this incisive work of cultural criticism and American history in the pages of Bookforum: "The smartest, most original, most unexpectedly definitive account of the rise of Trump and Trumpism we've had so far.

Has the Trump Administration strengthened our nation's position on the global stage -- or are we now, as a country, weaker in terms of international geopolitics? On this broadcast of ST, we welcome James Lindsay, Senior Vice President at the Council on Foreign Relations, where he oversees the work of the more than six dozen fellows in the David Rockefeller Studies Program. Lindsay is considered a leading authority on the American foreign policy-making process and on the domestic politics of U.S. foreign policy.

Photo by The Washinton Times

On this edition of ST, we speak with Robert Donaldson, Trustees Professor of Political Science (Emeritus) at The University of Tulsa. A former President of TU, Donaldson is also an expert on international politics, especially Soviet, Russian, and American foreign policies.

We chat with Ian Shapiro, the Sterling Professor of Political Science and director of the MacMillan Center at Yale University. He's the co-author of a new book, "Responsible Parties: Saving Democracy from Itself," which he tells us about. The book engagingly explores why and how the form of government known as democracy has -- quite strangely and paradoxically -- reduced if not eradicated trust in political systems worldwide.

On this edition of our program, we're discussing a recent DHS-related proposal put forth by the Trump Administration as well as local efforts to challenge this proposal. The proposal in question would change the accepted ferderal definition of Public Charge, which is a term used by immigration officials to refer to certain legal immigrants who are able to receive government benefits like food assistance, housing assistance, and health care.

Our guest is Malcolm Nance, a well-respected intelligence-community member and a counter-terrorism analyst for NBC News and MSNBC. He tells us about his new book, "The Plot to Destroy Democracy: How Putin and His Spies Are Undermining America and Dismantling the West." As was noted of this work by Kirkus Reviews: "Did Donald Trump meet with the Russians before the election?

Now that it's been a week since the unprecedented (and, by many accounts, quite surreal) summit between President Donald Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un in Singapore, what are the main "takeaways" from that event? What did we learn? And what -- if anything -- did each individual actually gain or achieve? And what happens next? Our guest is Scott Snyder, a senior fellow for Korea studies and director of the program on U.S.-Korea policy at the Council on Foreign Relations.

On this edition of ST, an in-depth chat about President Donald Trump and the Middle East. Our guest is Daniel Benaim, a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress (where he researches U.S. policy in the Middle East) as well as a visiting lecturer at New York University. He's also been a foreign-policy speechwriter at the White House, the U.S. Department of State, and the U.S. Senate.

What's a "typical day at the office" like for a reporter who's been assigned to cover the White House? How often do presidents traveling on Air Force One actually stroll to the back of the plane and chat with journalists? How much prep work goes (or doesn't go) into the annual White House Turkey Pardon, just before Thanksgiving? On this edition of ST, we listen to a "Public Radio Tulsa Give and Take" conversation that was recorded recently, on Saturday the 30th.

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