Energy Policy

Yes, the climate is warming, and yes, we human beings are causing this warming. And yes, things look very bad. But what can be done...and what can **we** do...right now? Our guest has some answers; she is Dr. Kimberly Nicholas, Associate Professor of Sustainability Science at the well-regarded Lund University in Sweden.

Our guest is Vaclav Smil, a Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the University of Manitoba. Smil is the author of 40+ books on topics like energy, environmental and population change, food production and nutrition, technical innovation, risk asssessment, and public policy. He joins us to discuss his accessible and compelling new book of short essays, "Numbers Don't Lie." It's an eclectic, statistics-driven volume that effectively shows how numbers reveal the true state of our world today -- and how such numbers, much like unalterable facts, are what matter most.

Next week here at TU -- on October 11th, in a free-to-the-public event at the Lorton Performance Center -- the University's College of Engineering and Natural Sciences will present energy and power-system expert Robert Bryce, who will give the 2019 Hulings Lecture. This lecture will be followed by a screening of Bryce's film, "Juice: How Electricity Explains the World." (More on this event is posted here.) Bryce is our guest today.

(Note: This show first aired back in July.) Our guest is Russell Gold, who has reported on energy regularly in The Wall Street Journal since 2002; his coverage of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill was honored with a Gerald Loeb Award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Gold joins us to discuss his book, "Superpower: One Man's Quest to Transform American Energy." This book profiles Michael Skelly, an infrastructure builder who began working on wind energy in 2000, back when many people considered the entire wind-power industry a joke.

Our guest is Russell Gold, who has reported on energy regularly in The Wall Street Journal since 2002; his coverage of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill was honored with a Gerald Loeb Award and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Gold joins us to discuss his new book, "Superpower: One Man's Quest to Transform American Energy." This book profiles Michael Skelly, an infrastructure builder who began working on wind energy in 2000, back when many people considered the entire wind-power industry a joke.

The earth's climate has warmed significantly since the late 19th century, and the activities of humankind -- primarily greenhouse-gas emissions -- are the main cause behind this warming. Such is the consensus view of the world's climate scientists. On today's ST, we explore the issue of climate change with a noted **political** scientist. Joshua Busby is an Associate Professor of Public Affairs and a Distinguished Scholar at the Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas.

As noted in a 2014 article by Robert Kaplan in Forbes Magazine: "Geopolitics is the battle for space and power played out in a geographical setting. Just as there are military geopolitics, diplomatic geopolitics, and economic geopolitics, there is also energy geopolitics. For natural resources and the trade routes that bring those resources to consumers are central to the study of geography. Every international order in early modern and modern history is based on an energy resource.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, an interesting chat with Gustavo Coronel, who had a 30+ year career in the petroleum industry in Venezuela, Holland, Algiers, Indonesia, most of Latin America, and the United States, while working for Royal Dutch-Shell, Phillips Petroleum, and Petroleos de Venezuela. Since 2006, he has been an independent consultant on the geopolitics of energy and Latin American public policy.

On this edition of ST, an interesting, big-ideas-driven conversation with Dr. Jim Norwine, the Regents Professor Emeritus of Geography at Texas A&M University-Kingsville. Dr. Norwine is the editor of a textbook called "A World after Climate Change and Culture-Shift" from Springer Publishers. It's a collection of essays that's described like so at the Springer website: "An international team of environmental and social scientists explain two powerful current change-engines and how their effects, and our responses to them, will transform Earth and humankind into the 22nd-century....

Consumer Energy Alliance

Stillwater leaders are considering new rules on energy production inside city limits. Recent earthquakes and potential damage to the environment has prompted a proposal to implement a 22-hundred foot setback. It’s led to a backlash by those who say that would ban any energy production in the city. David Holt is President of Consumer Energy Alliance. He says any such regulations must be balanced, and a setback that large is effectively a ban.

The Alliance proposes a task force that takes into account those on both sides of the issue…environmental groups and business interests.

On this installment of ST, we offer a discussion of how oil, coal, and other energy sources are influencing today's international geo-politics. Our guest is James Clad, a diversely experienced foreign-affairs and oil-policy expert who consults for various energy and investment firms worldwide. Clad is a senior adviser at the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA) in Arlington, Virginia, as well as an advisor to IHS Jane's and Cambridge Energy Research Associates (CERA). From 2002 to 2010, Clad served as U.S.

Harvard University

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with political scientist and sociologist Theda Skocpol, whose recent work has focused on how political policy is made, and more often these days, how it gets derailed. Skocpol is the Victor Thomas Professor of Government and Sociology at Harvard University, and the author of numerous books on how political policy has been shaped and changed throughout history.