Family Life

Oklahoma, as you might've heard, is welcoming more Afghan refugees than any state in the US other than California and Texas. How many of these refugees will be settling in the Tulsa area in the coming weeks and months? And what's being done to welcome these new neighbors of ours? What is being done to help them find homes or jobs, to help them enroll in school or locate health care, to show them how to obtain a driver's license or speak English? How are various groups and individuals throughout the Tulsa area working to ease their transition?

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Eric Garcia, a political journalist based in Washington, DC, who's worked for or written for National Journal, Marketwatch, Roll Call, The New Republic, The Daily Beast, and other publications. He joins us to discuss his remarkable new book, "We're Not Broken: Changing the Autism Conversation." As Garcia, who is himself on the spectrum, writes in these pages: "This book is a message from autistic people to their parents, friends, teachers, coworkers, and doctors showing what life is like on the spectrum. It's also my love letter to autistic people.

Our guest on ST is Emily Oster, a professor of economics at Brown University whose earlier books include "Expecting Better" and "Cribsheet." She joins us to talk about her new book, "The Family Firm: A Data-Driven Guide to Better Decision Making in the Early School Years." As was noted of this volume by The Washington Post: "A targeted mini-MBA program designed to help moms and dads establish best practices for day-to-day operations....

Photo via www.somersetlive.co.uk

Our guest is the award-winning science journalist Melinda Wenner Moyer, whose work appears in Slate, Scientific American, and The New York Times. She's also a parent, and she joins us to discuss her first book, which is just out. "How to Raise Kids Who Aren't A**holes: Science-Based Strategies for Better Parenting -- from Tots to Teens" is a guidebook focused on the many various concerns that moms and dads actually have in today's America.

(Note: This interview first aired back in February.) Our guest is Kayleen Schaefer, a journalist and author who's written for The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and other publications. Her latest book, which she tells us about, is "But You're Still So Young: How Thirtysomethings Are Redefining Adulthood." The book looks carefully at how thirtysomethings in America today are -- and aren't -- meeting the milestones which sociologists commonly cite as the five markers of adulthood: finishing school, leaving home, marriage, gaining financial independence, and having kids.

Yes, the nation is deeply, counter-productively divided -- and yes, American politics and American culture probably haven't been this divided in decades.... But what can we DO about such polarization? Our guest is Peter T. Coleman, a professor of psychology and education at Columbia University, where he holds a joint appointment at Teachers College and the Earth Institute.

On this edition of ST, we are discussing a book that first appeared as a small, privately-printed volume back in 1923 -- it's an extremely important, frequently cited, and quite special book in that it offers a rare, first-hand account of the Tulsa Race Massacre. Written by one Mary Parrish, a journalist and teacher, the book is "The Nation Must Awake: My Witness to the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921." In the opening pages of the text, we learn that Parrish was reading in her home in Tulsa's Greenwood neighborhood when the massacre began on the evening of May 31, 1921.

Our guest is Suzanne Koven, a primary care physician and the inaugural writer-in-residence at Massachusetts General Hospital; she is also a member of the faculty at Harvard Medical School. Koven joins us to discuss her new memoir, "Letter to a Young Female Physician." It's a work that, as the writer Andrew Solomon has noted, "charts both the real and the spurious demands that the medical system makes on those who become doctors and care for us all. [Koven's] memoir is by turns reassuring and disturbing, comical and tragic, hopeful and dire.

Our guest on ST is Anna America, the Chief of Culture and Recreation & Parks Director for the City of Tulsa. The Tulsa Parks Department recently presented findings from a series of public-opinion surveys it's conducted over the past several months regarding its master plan. The consulting firm known as GreenPlay was employed in the execution of these surveys, as America tells us. She adds that more than half of those surveyed said that they'd "probably or definitely support" various potential funding sources for increasing the Parks Department's budget.

According to Census data released last week, Oklahoma has experienced the slowest population growth since 1990. People are having fewer children. So we asked students at the University of Tulsa what their plans are for family. 

  

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we discuss a work that takes a careful and long-overdue look at how caregiving and burnout so often go hand-in-hand in this country. Our guest is Kate Washington, an essayist, freelance writer, and food critic based in Northern California. Her new book, which she tells us about, is a memoir/report/study titled "Already Toast: Caregiving and Burnout in America." As was noted by Kirkus Reviews, this book is "a biting critique of how America is failing its unpaid caregivers....

(Note: This interview originally aired back in September.) Our guest is the writer Jeff Hobbs, whose latest book closely follows four Los Angeles high school boys as they apply to college. These four teens are seniors at two very different high schools in L.A. -- one in Compton, the other in Beverly Hills -- and by telling their individual, personal stories, Hobbs reveals what our nation's young people (across all socio-economic backgrounds) are now confronting at home, at school, among peers, and throughout society.

Our guests today are the co-authors of an engrossing new book that blends true crime, memoir, and investigative reportage. Liza Rodman and Jennifer Jordan join us to talk about "The Babysitter: My Summers with a Serial Killer." This book details the life of a neglected young girl growing up in the Cape Cod region of the late 1960s, revealing in particular how she developed a friendship with her charismatic yet off-beat babysitter -- a man who, as she learned years later, was actually a serial killer.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is journalist and author Larry Olmsted, who tells us about his latest book, "Fans: How Watching Sports Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Understanding." The book cites a wide range of new and recent studies on the topic of sports fandom, thus arguing that the more we root for a given sports team, the better our social, psychological, and physical health is likely to be -- and the more meaningful our personal relationships will be, and the more connected and happier we will feel overall.

(Note: This interview first aired in September of 2020.) Our guest is Rachel Louise Snyder, an award-winning journalist and professor of creative writing and journalism at American University. She talks about her latest book, which is "No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us." As was noted of this widely-acclaimed study by The Washington Post: "Compulsively readable.... In a writing style that's as gripping as good fiction, as intimate as memoir, and deeply informed, [Snyder] takes us into the lives of the abused, the abusers, and the survivors....

(Note: This interview first aired back in October.) We welcome Sarah Smarsh back to StudioTulsa for a discussion of her latest book. It's a collection of essays that all focus on a certain country-music icon who also happens to be one of the most unifying figures in American culture: Dolly Parton. Smarsh talks with us about how Parton has, for decades now, both embodied and emboldened American women who live and work in poverty.

Our guest is Kayleen Schaefer, a journalist and author who has written for The New York Times, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, and other publications. Her new book, which she tells us about, is "But You're Still So Young: How Thirtysomethings Are Redefining Adulthood." The book looks carefully at how thirtysomethings in America today are -- and aren't -- meeting the milestones which sociologists commonly cite as the five markers of adulthood: finishing school, leaving home, marriage, gaining financial independence, and having kids.

Our guest is the British author Jenny Lecoat. She's just published her debut novel, which she tells us about. "The Girl from the Channel Islands" is a compelling saga that happens to employ, at least in part, her own family's history. As was noted by Publishers Weekly: "Lecoat...draws on the history of Germany's WWII occupation of Jersey, one of the Channel Islands, where [she] was raised. During the summer of 1940, Hedy Bercu is living on Jersey after having escaped Nazi-occupied Vienna.

Welcome to The Best of StudioTulsa in 2020. All week, we'll be listening back to some standout interviews that originally aired last year.

Our guest is the author and doctor Michael Stein, who's also a professor of health law, policy, and management at Boston University. He tells us about his new book, which presents the many various moving, sobering, genuine, and often heartbreaking accounts of his patients about money...and about having (or not having) enough money to simply get by in the U.S. today. "Broke" gives us the words and thoughts of those now facing the reality of having to choose between getting medical treatments or paying their bills. As was noted of this book by Dr.

Our guest is Dr. Anne Hallward, the host and founder of Safe Space Radio. She is also a board-certified psychiatrist in Portland, Maine. Formerly on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and Cambridge Hospital, Dr. Hallward co-designed and taught courses on death and dying, cultural competence, sexuality, and psychiatric interviewing; she also published on death and dying, cultural bias in medicine, sexuality, and issues related to hunger.

Our guest is Katherine May, a writer of fiction as well as nonfiction based in the seaside community of Whitstable, England. She joins us to discuss her enjoyable new book, "Wintering," which draws many engaging and far-flung lessons from literature, history, nature, and mythology about the transformative -- and even inspiring -- power of rest, retreat, and recuperation. As was noted of this book by a critic writing for BookPage: "Beautiful.... [May] is a poetic observer of the natural world, and quotable lines abound....

Our guest is Chicago-based therapist and social worker, Joey Miller, MSW, LCSW, who has counseled women and their families for nearly two decades. She joins us to discuss her important new book, "Rebirth: The Journey of Pregnancy After a Loss." (You can learn more about, or contact, Joey Miller here.) A much-needed guidebook concerning a subject that many find difficult to talk about -- let alone deal with or confront -- "Rebirth" explains the challenges mothers and their partners can face after the loss of an infant.

In late 2015, Zac Easter, a young man from a small town in Iowa, took his own life. The reason? According to the many journals and detailed writings that Zac left behind, this act of suicide was chosen by Zac because he was unable to continue his long-running battle against worsening traumatic brain injuries -- injuries that stemmed directly from the fact that Zac had been a football player, from third grade through high school.

Our guest is longtime Tulsa resident Jane Mudgett, a well-respected local leader and businesswoman who's also a certified coach, a trainer, and a partner at the Exceptional Leaders Lab. She joins us to talk about her book, which first appeared earlier this year.

Our guest is the writer Jeff Hobbs, whose new book closely follows four Los Angeles high school boys as they apply to college. These four teens are seniors at two very different high schools in L.A. -- one in Compton, the other in Beverly Hills -- and by telling their individual, personal stories, Hobbs reveals what our nation's young people (across all socio-economic backgrounds) are now confronting at home, at school, among peers, and throughout society.

Our guest is Rachel Louise Snyder, an award-winning journalist and professor of creative writing and journalism at American University. She talks about her newest book, which is just out in paperback; the book is "No Visible Bruises: What We Don't Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us." As was noted of this widely-acclaimed study by The Washington Post: "Compulsively readable.... In a writing style that's as gripping as good fiction, as intimate as memoir, and deeply informed, [Snyder] takes us into the lives of the abused, the abusers, and the survivors....

On this edition of ST, we learn about a multi-artist, multi-media exhibition opening soon at Living Arts of Tulsa called "Speak: Speak While You Can." The show gathers works by several outstanding Native American artists, all of the creations focused on various indigenous/tribal langauges. Our guests are the co-curators of this show, both of them noted Native artists in their own right: Tony A. Tiger (Sac & Fox/Seminole/Muscogee) and Bobby C. Martin (Muscogee/Creek).

Monday the 31st will bring the first day of classes for Tulsa Public Schools, and given the current pandemic, this is certainly going to be a very different school year. All TPS students, for starters, will be participating in either of two distinct programs: Distance Learning or Virtual Academy. How do these differ? And what should TPS parents be expecting -- and/or planning for -- as the new school year begins?

You're probably familiar with this routine -- you swab your cheek or spit into a vial, then you send it away to a lab someplace. A month later, you get a report explaining where your ancestors came from...or whether you carry certain genetic risks. But what implications does this very popular trend have for American life and culture?

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