Family Life

Many of us living here in Oklahoma -- and indeed, living all over the nation -- are today both pleased and proud to affirm that Joy Harjo, the much-celebrated, 68-year-old writer and musician based in Tulsa, was recently named by the Library of Congress as the 23rd Poet Laureate of the United States. A member of the Muscogee Creek Nation, Harjo is the first Native person to be selected for this honorable role. On this edition of StudioTulsa, we listen back to a conversation that we aired with Harjo in 2012, when her well-regarded memoir, "Crazy Brave," had just appeared.

(Note: This interview originally aired last fall.) Our guest is Linda Kay Klein, whose detailed and engrossing new memoir looks at the devastating effects that evangelical Christianity's purity culture has had on a generation of young women in America. Back in the 1990s, the widespread white evangelical Christian culture created a "purity movement" of sorts -- purity rings, purity pledges, purity balls, etc. Girls were seen by this movement as potential sexual "stumbling blocks" for boys and men, and any expression of a girl's sexuality could be judged as a corruption of her character.

Nathan Englander is our guest; he's the bestselling author of "For the Relief of Unbearable Urges," "What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank, and "Dinner at the Center of the Earth," among other books. He joins us to discuss his new novel, "Kaddish.com." Per a critic writing for The New York Times, this book is "sublime.... [It] reads like a modern-day Hasidic tale in which religious characters are bedeviled by the challenges of upholding God's word in an all too human world.... Kafka and Roth's influences are felt in Englander's work....

Our guest is the Oklahoma-based author, attorney, and legal scholar Walter Echo-Hawk.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Bob Hudson, a Clinical Professor of Pediatrics with the OU School of Community Medicine in Tulsa. He's practiced general pediatrics for the past 30 years -- and has spent the past 16 years as a behavioral pediatrician, helping parents whose children exhibit behavioral or learning problems. Dr.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in November.) News flash: Cats do not meow at random. Nor do they hiss because they have nothing better to do. Cat sounds do have a purpose -- and they can carry important messages. But what ARE those messages? Our guest has some interesting answers: Susanne Schötz, a professor at Lund University in Sweden, is part of a long-standing research program exploring how and why cats use vocal communication...with each other and with their human caretakers.

On this edition of our show, we learn about the nonprofit known as Connected Kids, which, per its webiste, "believes that every child needs and deserves connection. It is essential to overcoming trauma and becoming courageous, purposeful, self-directed, and independent. And it is possible! With the right tools and support, we can build healing connections with children who have been through even the darkest of circumstances." This organization was founded by Rr. Barbara Sorrels, who is our guest today.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in January.) Our guest is Dr. Duane Bidwell, a  professor of practical theology, spiritual care, and counseling at Claremont School of Theology in California. He tells us about his book, "When One Religion Isn't Enough: The Lives of Spiritually Fluid People." This timely volume, named a Best Book of 2018 by Library Journal, looks closely and respectfully at the lives of people who embrace two or more religious traditions.

Our guest is the bestselling young-adult writer Laurie Halse Anderson, who is widely known and appreciated for the brave manner in which she writes about, and advocates for, survivors of sexual assault. Her novel "Speak," which first appeared two decades ago, was groundbreaking in this regard.

Our guest is Mitchell S. Jackson, whose new book is an autobiographical collection of essays called "Survival Math: Notes on an All-American Family." As was noted by The Boston Globe, it's a "vibrant memoir of race, violence, family, and manhood.... Jackson recognizes there is too much for one conventional form, and his various storytelling methods imbue the book with an unpredictable dexterity. It is sharp and unshrinking in depictions of his life, his relatives (blood kin and otherwise), and his Pacific Northwest hometown, which serves as both inescapable character and villain....

Our guests are Mike Appel and Emily Oakley, the husband-and-wife team behind Three Springs Farm, a small but active organic farm in Oaks, Oklahoma (about an hour east of Tulsa). Mike and Emily are well-known for their long-standing gig at the Cherry Street Farmers' Market, where they sell their produce on Saturdays from April to September. They join us on ST Medical Monday for a detailed chat about growing and selling organic food -- and about, more generally, farming at the grassroots scale.

(Note: This program originally aired in December.) Our guest is Anna Leahy, director of the Creative Writing Program at Chapman University. She joins us to discuss her book, "Tumor." A brief yet thoughtful volume that is part memoir, part study, and part history, the book was thus praised by Prof. Kristen Iversen at the University of Cincinnati: "In clear, compelling language, Leahy writes with insight and empathy about cancer and the social and cultural dimensions of one of our greatest fears.

Our guest is the New Mexico-based writer, poet, and educator Lauren Camp, whose books include "One Hundred Hungers" (winner of the Dorset Prize and a finalist for the Arab American Book Award) and "Turquoise Door." Last year, Camp presented her poems on dementia at the Mayo Clinic and also at an Alzheimer's Association Caregivers Conference. "Poetry & Dementia: A Reading with Lauren Camp" will happen on Thursday the 7th at 7pm in TU's Tyrrell Hall; the gathering is free to the public.

On this installment of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, a timely conversation with two community leaders who are both involved with the Tulsa Community Service Council, and who are both, moreover, U.S. Military veterans: Dr. Erv Janssen and Jim Lyall. They join us to define and discuss the experience known as moral injury -- an affliction that's similar to post-traumatic stress disorder, yet which also differs from PTSD in several important ways.

Our guest is James Wagner, the Chief of Performance Strategy and Innovation for the City of Tulsa. He leads a team in Mayor Bynum's office that aims to use data both effectively and intelligently in order to reach goals, remove barriers, find solutions, and foster community throughout Tulsa. Wagner joins us to discuss the results of a newly announced data-driven study that Tulsa has completed with the aid of the Gallup polling organization.

Our guest is Sarah Archer, a writer and curator who contributes to Slate, The Atlantic, Architectural Digest, and other publications. She tells us about her book, "Midcentury Christmas," which explores what Archer thinks of as the turning-point of Christmas in America -- i.e., the years just after WWII. This was an era when when new technologies, changing social and economic roles, and off-the-charts prosperity altered everything about American life -- including the Yuletide season.

Our guest on ST is the locally based photographer and writer, Rhys Martin, who joins us to discuss his new book: "Lost Restaurants of Tulsa." The book is just out, and it reveals the histories of dozens of restaurants from T-Town's past -- family sagas, culinary wonders, beloved diners, edge-of-town favorites, popular hang-outs, and more. It's a book that's sure to appeal to those who can lip-smackingly recall the likes of Pennington's, Shotgun Sam's, Villa Venice, The Golden Drumstick, The Razor Clam, St. Michael's Alley, The Louisiane, et al.

Our guest on ST Medical Monday is Dr. Judy Melinek, a board-certified forensic pathologist practicing forensic medicine in California's Bay Area, where she is also the CEO of PathologyExpert, Inc. Lately, Dr.

On this edition of our program, we're discussing a recent DHS-related proposal put forth by the Trump Administration as well as local efforts to challenge this proposal. The proposal in question would change the accepted ferderal definition of Public Charge, which is a term used by immigration officials to refer to certain legal immigrants who are able to receive government benefits like food assistance, housing assistance, and health care.

The Early Childhood Education Institute (or ECEI) at OU-Tulsa last month received a $2.7 million grant from NIH's National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to extend its work with researchers from Georgetown University.

Our guest is Tony Moore, Director of the Gathering Place, the greatly anticipated and privately funded public park that will open alongside the Arkansas River here in Tulsa on Saturday, September 8th. Moore brings us up to speed on what this massive and very special space -- the ground for which was broken back in 2014 -- will have to offer all of the people of Greater Tulsa. Per the Gathering Place website: "The next chapter is filled with excitement as we welcome our first guests....

Our guest on ST is Kendra Taira Field, an assistant professor of history and director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we talk about the ongoing effort to make Route 66 a part of the U.S. National Park Serivce's National Historic Trail System. If this were to happen, Route 66 would become the 20th such trail in America, joining The Lewis and Clark Trail, The Oregon Trail, and others. This designation could mean a serious economic boost to our state, as Oklahoma has more Route 66 mileage than any other state through which the highway runs. We have two guests today.

On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we speak with Dr. Ruth Potee, who is both a Family Physician and an Addiction Medicine Physician based in Greenfield, Mass. She's also the Medical Director for the Franklin County House of Corrections, the Franklin Recovery and Treatment Center, and the Pioneer Valley Regional School District. As such, Dr.

The Blue Zones Project will present a series of events here in Tulsa this week, and so, on this edition of ST Medical Monday, we listen back to a Blue Zones-related interview from our archives. In 2016, we spoke with one Tony Buettner. Several years ago, Tony's brother Dan executed the original Blue Zones study, and then wrote a bestselling book about same.

(Note: This interview originally aired in December.) Our guest is the author and journalist Ted Genoways, who is a contributing editor at Mother Jones, The New Republic, and Pacific Standard. A fourth-generation Nebraskan, Genoways has a book out that profiles a subject near and dear to his heart. "This Blessed Earth: A Year in the Life of an American Family Farm" documents the lives and labors behind a small family farm located in York County, Nebraska.

On this edition of ST, an interesting discussion with Hannibal B. Johnson, the Tulsa-based attorney, local historian, and prolific author. He joins us to talk about his newest book, which is just out: "The Sawners of Chandler: A Pioneering Power Couple in Pre-Civil Rights Oklahoma." As is noted of this compelling and eye-opening book at Mr.

On this edition of StudioTulsa Medical Monday, a discussion about fighting opioid addiction at the individual, societal, and legal levels. Our guest is the successful OKC-based trial lawyer, Reggie Whitten. He'll be a co-lead counsel for the State of Oklahoma in an upcoming lawsuit against four different Big Pharma firms; that trial is set to begin in May of next year. Whitten's stake in the lawsuit is also quite personal; in 2002, he lost his son, Brandon, to a car accident triggered by Brandon's addiction to prescription drugs.

Our guest is the Tulsa-based author Joe Johnston, who's originally from Missouri, and who's written many books over the years on various topics. He joins us to talk about his newest publication, a folksy, far-ranging, and conversational history of Southern cooking -- from sun tea and fruitcake and vegetables to "the Colonel's chicken" and BBQ and beyond.

Our guest is Kim Brophey, a nationally certified and award-winning canine behavior consultant based in Asheville, North Carolina. She joins us to discuss her new book, "Meet Your Dog: The Game-Changing Guide to Understanding Your Dog's Behavior." In this work, Brophey explains her so-called "L.E.G.S." approach -- as in, "Learning, Environment, Genetics, and Self." As was noted of this book by Alexandre Rossi (the author of "A Dog at the Keyboard"): "It's refreshing to finally find a book that takes into consideration the many predispositions to behavior problems in dogs.

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