Federal Government

Our guest is TU's Phi Beta Kappa Carl F. Cranor Visiting Scholar, Corey Brettschneider. He joins us to talk about his recent book, "The Oath and the Office." This book will form the basis for his upcoming, free-to-the-public Phi Beta Kappa lecture, which Brettschneider will give online this evening (the 17th) at 5pm.

Our guest is the author and foreign affairs expert, Sarah Chayes, who has worked as the special assistant on corruption to Mike Mullen, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. She's also advised David McKiernan and Stanley McChrystal (commanders of the International Security Assistant Force) and has been a reporter for NPR.

Our guest is the widely celebrated novelist and nonfiction writer Nicholson Baker, whose new book is an engrossing mash-up of history, journalism, and memoir. The book is called "Baseless," and it's focused on the modern-day Freedom of Information Act, or FOIA. Baker's gripping and typically candid account carefully documents what it feels like to try to write about major historical events in a world of pervasive redactions, witheld records, widespead cover-ups, and glacially slow governmental responses.

(Note: This interview first aired back in February.) Very early in her career, the well-regarded American colonial historian Mary Beth Norton came to believe that the critical year in American independence was not 1776, but rather, 1774. Yet her academic focus on women's colonial history sidelined her interest in fleshing out this theory.

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Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a surprising 5-4 decision in the case of McGirt v. Oklahoma; the Court ruled that much of the eastern half of Oklahoma is still an Indian reservation. In doing so, the Court affirmed that -- because Congress had not expressly disestablished the Muskogee Creek Reservation, which was created well over a century ago -- that Reservation still exists when it comes to the Federal Major Crimes Act.

Public health officials in Tulsa -- and everywhere else, of course -- are now monitoring an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a new coronavirus, COVID-19. This virus was first identified in China in January. Late last week, the first confirmed COVID-19 case was announced in Tulsa County: a man in his fifties who had recently visited Italy. On this edition of ST Medical Monday, we offer an update on this still-evolving, fast-changing situation. Our guest is the Tulsa Health Department's executive director, Dr. Bruce Dart, who has worked in public health for forty years.

All of Washington, DC -- indeed, all of American politics -- has been in a frenzy ever since a whistleblower's complaint came to light, only a couple of weeks ago, regarding President Trump's July 25th phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. Information about this call prompted House Democrats to begin their impeachment inquiry of the President, and now a second whistleblower is apparently coming forward (as well as, possibly, a third). On ST today, we look back on the history of whistleblowers in America. Our guest is Prof.

On this edition of our program, we discuss one of the cases that will be heard when the U.S. Supreme Court comes back into session next week. "Sharp v. Murphy" (previously known as "Carpenter v. Murphy") is a case that turns on whether Congress disestablished the Muscogee (Creek) Nation reservation. Although this question pertains specifically to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, the Court's decision might also end up applying to reservations of the Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole Nations. Our guest is a locally based expert on this case, TU Law Professor Judith Royster.

Our guest is Robert Kuttner, co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect, who is also a former columnist for BusinessWeek, the Washington Post, and the Boston Globe. He joins us to discuss his new book, which argues that the 2020 presidential election will determine the very survival of American democracy. To restore popular faith in government -- and win the election -- Kuttner maintains that Democrats must nominate and elect an economic progressive. "The Stakes" explains how the failure of our economy to serve ordinary Americans effectively paved the way for a demagogic president.

Our guest is Philip Mudd, former deputy director of the CIA Counterterrorist Center, who tells us about his new book, "Black Site." It depicts one of the most controversial and unsettling initiatives in American history -- i.e., the post-9/11 counterterrorism effort created and led by the CIA. Just after September 11, 2001, as we learn, the CIA evolved into a war-fighting intelligence service, constructing what was known internally as "the Program" -- a web of top-secret detention facilities intended to help prevent future attacks on American soil and worldwide.

Our guest is Larry Diamond, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and Stanford's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. He is also a past director of Stanford's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Diamond joins us to discus his new book, "Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency." As was noted by Gary J. Bass in The New York Times Book Review: "[Diamond] has spent 40 years circumnavigating the globe promoting democracy in Nigeria, Venezuela, and some 70 other countries. Yet today he is aghast....

Has the long-standing, bi-partisan, and rather rarified U.S. foreign policy establishment effectively failed our country? Yes, according to our guest today: Stephen M. Walt is a Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He previously taught at Princeton and the University of Chicago, and he's now a contributing editor at Foreign Policy magazine. Walt's latest book is "The Hell of Good Intentions: America's Foreign Policy Elite and the Decline of U.S.

Our guest is César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández, an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Denver. On Thursday the 14th, beginning at 6pm, he'll deliver the 19th Annual Buck Colbert Franklin Memorial Civil Rights Lecture on the TU campus. He'll speak on "Migrating to Prison: Immigration in the Age of Mass Incarceration," which is also the title of his forthcoming book. His academic interests center on "crimmigration law" -- meaning, the convergence of criminal law and immigration law. His previous book, "Crimmigration Law," was published by the American Bar Association in 2015.

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Our guest is John Brennan, the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency, where he served from 2013 to 2017. Previously a deputy national security advisor and assistant to President Barack Obama for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, Brennan today speaks to various audiences about how to both think of and respond to global events, terrorism, and cybersecurity concerns.

We chat with Ian Shapiro, the Sterling Professor of Political Science and director of the MacMillan Center at Yale University. He's the co-author of a new book, "Responsible Parties: Saving Democracy from Itself," which he tells us about. The book engagingly explores why and how the form of government known as democracy has -- quite strangely and paradoxically -- reduced if not eradicated trust in political systems worldwide.

What happens when we as a society stop trusting our experts, stop consulting our longtime scholars, and stop listening to our intelligence-community professionals? What happens to our foreign policy? How are this nation's relationships with the rest of the world affected? How is our government itself altered? Our guest on ST is the conservative writer and scholar, Tom Nichols, who is also a Professor of National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College.

On this edition of our program, we're discussing a recent DHS-related proposal put forth by the Trump Administration as well as local efforts to challenge this proposal. The proposal in question would change the accepted ferderal definition of Public Charge, which is a term used by immigration officials to refer to certain legal immigrants who are able to receive government benefits like food assistance, housing assistance, and health care.

Our guest is Wendy Sherman, a Senior Counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group and a former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs. Ambassador Sherman is also a Senior Fellow at Harvard's Belfer Center and is a member of both the Council on Foreign Relations and the Aspen Strategy Group. She was also a Chief Negotiator for the Iran Nuclear Deal; her newly published memoir is called "Not for the Faint of Heart: Lessons in Courage, Power, and Persistence." She was a guest recently of the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations.

Now that it's been a week since the unprecedented (and, by many accounts, quite surreal) summit between President Donald Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un in Singapore, what are the main "takeaways" from that event? What did we learn? And what -- if anything -- did each individual actually gain or achieve? And what happens next? Our guest is Scott Snyder, a senior fellow for Korea studies and director of the program on U.S.-Korea policy at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Since the end of World War II, the Atlantic Alliance between the countries of Western Europe and the United States has been a cornerstone of U.S. foreign policy. Despite various strains over the years, my guest today has said: "We've always argued about the 'means,' not the 'ends,' of policy. Now we seem to want very different end results." He was referring in this comment to the Trump Administration's decision to withdraw from the Iranian nuclear deal, despite near-unanimous European opposition.

Americans are less and less in agreement these days -- polarization, as we all know, has become a buzzword...and an omnipresent reality. But if there's one thing everyone agree on, it's that Washington, DC, is broken. How can it be fixed? Our guest is Joseph A. Califano, Jr., who spent thirty years in Washington at the top of the Pentagon, on the White House staff as chief domestic advisor to the President, and in the Cabinet.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with Joseph Cassidy, who is a Global Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Previously, he was a longtime U.S. State Department diplomat, serving in the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and South America. Cassidy is also, in the fall of 2017, acting as a Distinguished Visiting Fellow with the Center for International Business and Human Rights at the University of Oklahoma College of Law.