Feminism

We welcome Sarah Smarsh back to StudioTulsa for a discussion of her new book. It's a collection of essays that all focus on a certain country-music icon who also happens to be one of the most unifying figures in American culture: Dolly Parton. Smarsh talks with us about how Parton has, for decades now, both embodied and emboldened American women who live and work in poverty. Few other musical artists, the author argues, seem as truly **genuine** as Parton, and few can match her gift for telling powerful stories about life, love, men, family, hard times, and surviving.

On this final installment in our Found@TU podcast series, which has explored all manner of faculty research being done here at the University, we welcome Dr. Kristen Tegtmeier Oertel, the Mary Frances Barnard Professor of 19th Century American History. She describes her research on slavery and abolition, especially in relation to race and gender. Growing up on the Kansas/Missouri border, as it turns out, led Dr. Oertel to explore how Native Americans, African-Americans, and women shaped the politics of that region during the Civil War.

Our guest is Dr. Jen Gunter, who is board-certified in OB/GYN and pain medicine, and who writes about the intersection of women's health, sex, science, and pop culture for The New York Times. She joins us via Skype to discuss her new book, which is her second: "The Vagina Bible." Does eating sugar cause yeast infections? Does pubic hair have a function? Should you have a vulvovaginal care regimen? Will your vagina shrivel up if you go without sex? What's the truth about the HPV vaccine? Such are the questions explored in this thorough, useful, myth-busting, and best-selling book.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the noted historian and scholar Blanche Wiesen Cook. The third and final volume of her landmark biography of Eleanor Roosevelt has just been published. "Eleanor Roosevelt, Volume 3: The War Years and After, 1939-1962" covers the final decades of a woman who towers over the 20th century, taking us through World War II, FDR's death, the founding of the United Nations, and much more. It is, as Maureen Corrigan noted on NPR's Fresh Air, "a monumental biography [and] an exhilarating story, as well as an undeniably melancholy one.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak by phone with the novelist and writing instructor Eileen Pollack, whose books include the novels "Breaking and Entering" and "Paradise, New York," as well as two collections of short fiction and two creative-nonfiction textbooks. Her newest book is a memoir called "The Only Woman in the Room: Why Science Is Still a Boys' Club," and it looks back on her challenging experiences as a young woman majoring in physics at Yale in the 1970s while also highlighting various issues that still plague women in science across the nation today.

(Note: This interview originally aired back in May.) Our guest on this edition of StudioTulsa is Timothy Dwyer, a writer whose work has appeared in Time, Washingtonian, and TheAtlantic.com.

On this installment of ST, on the eve of the Fourth of July, we replay an interview from last year with the Denver-based journalist and nonfiction author Helen Thorpe, whose writing has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Texas Monthly, and elsewhere. Thorpe's first book, 2009's widely acclaimed "Just Like Us," tellingly profiled the lives of three young Latinas living in the United States.

On this edition of ST, we speak with the Kentucky-based writer and historian, Emily Bingham, who is the author of "Mordecai: An Early American Family" (2003) and co-editor of "The Southern Agrarians and the New Deal." Bingham tells us about her newest book, which is actually a biography of her own great-aunt: "Irrepressible: The Jazz Age Life of Henrietta Bingham." As was noted of this volume in a starred review in Kirkus: "A colorful portrait of a daring woman....

(Note: This edition of ST first aired back in April.) A century ago, women could not own property or vote. Today, women are the primary wage earners in about 40% of American households, and are poised to be a majority within twenty years if current trends continue. Washington Post staff writer Liza Mundy calls it "The Big Flip" and examines this huge cultural shift and its impact on gender roles, relationships, and social dynamics.

(Note: This show first aired back in April.) A century ago, women could not own property or vote. Today, women are the primary wage earners in about 40% of American households, and are poised to be a majority within twenty years if current trends continue. Washington Post staff writer Liza Mundy calls it "The Big Flip" and examines this huge cultural shift and its impact on gender roles, relationships, and social dynamics.

A century ago, women could not own property or vote. Today, women are the primary wage earners in about 40% of American households, and are poised to be a majority within twenty years if current trends continue. Washington Post staff writer Liza Mundy calls it "The Big Flip" and examines this huge cultural shift and its impact on gender roles, relationships, and social dynamics.

On today's program, an encore broadcast of a show that first aired back in November, we hear from Kristen Oertel, who holds the Barnard Chair in 19th-Century American History here at the University of Tulsa. Oertel has co-written a new and award-winning book (just out from the University Press of Kansas) called "Frontier Feminist: Clarina Howard Nichols and the Politics of Motherhood." It's a remarkable biography of a little-remembered yet vitally important American woman who meaningfully participated in several of the crucial social/political movements of her time.