Film

We're pleased to welcome back to our program the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Glenn Frankel, whose newest book, which he tells us about, is "Shooting Midnight Cowboy: Art, Sex, Loneliness, Liberation, and the Making of a Dark Classic." The book employs in-depth interviews with the film's director, stars, crew, casting team, and others to provide the definitive account of an American movie like no other. One of the most innovative and daring motion pictures of its time, Midnight Cowboy won three Oscars, including Best Picture...and it was the first film ever to get an "X" rating.

Our guest is the writer and film historian Mark Harris, whose newest book, which he tells us about, is a biography of Mike Nichols (1931-2014). Born Mikhail Igor Peschkowsky in Berlin, the young Nichols, along with his brother and his parents, escaped the Nazis in 1939 by relocating to the United States. Nichols went on to have a long, remarkably creative career in show business, thriving as a film and theater director, actor, producer, and comedian. As a director, he was known and celebrated for helping his actors deliver particularly strong performances.

WGBH Boston

Our guest on ST is the documentary filmmaker, Sam Pollard, who directed "Goin' Back to T-Town." This remarkable film, which dates from the early 1990s, tells the then-nearly-forgotten-but-now-familiar story of Greenwood, the "Black Wall Street" neighborhood in Tulsa which prospered during the early 20th century, and which was all but erased in 1921 by one of the worst race-driven massacres in U.S. history. "Goin' Back to T-Town" will be shown next week (on Monday the 8th) on PBS television.

The acclaimed Hollywood screenwriter Walter Bernstein died recently at the age of 101. His films included "Fail-Safe," "Paris Blues," "The Molly Maguires," "Semi-Tough," and lastly, to cite a 1976 classic starring Woody Allen that was based on Bernstein's own experiences as a blacklisted writer in Fifties Hollywood, "The Front." On this edition of ST, we listen back to our 1997 conversation with Walter Bernstein. At that time, he'd just put out a book called "Inside Out: A Memoir of the Blacklist."

File photo

Tulsa Regional Tourism has launched programs to help the local film and music industries during the coronavirus pandemic.

Productions filming in Tulsa County can apply to the $90,000 Tulsa County Film Recovery Program for help with costs related to COVID-19. Tulsa Office of Film, Music, Arts and Culture Executive Director Abby Kurin said they’ve already approved an application from a feature film and are considering one from a cable network for a pilot.

Updated July 15, 10:05 a.m.: References to the Tulsa Regional Chamber were changed to Tulsa Regional Tourism. A Tulsa Regional Tourism spokesperson clarified while the organization is an arm of the chamber, it is pursuing the initiatives and supporting a mask requirement independently of the chamber.

Tulsa Regional Tourism has an initiative in the works to get tourists back to the area.

This month on C-SPAN, the public affairs network has been airing short documentaries created by Jenks High School students, winners in the network's annual Student Cam video documentary competition. Leviathan Lee and Mason Chow won 1st Prize for their documentary on the opioid crisis "200,000." 

Lots of time at home these days...for so many of us...as we continue to shelter in place, for the safety of ourselves and everyone else, in the Age of Coronavirus. On this installment of ST, we have tips regarding books to read as well as videos to watch during these days of prolonged self-isolation. Our guests are Rebecca Howard with the Tulsa City-County Library and Chuck Foxen with the Circle Cinema.

Our guest is Titus I. Jackson, the writer/director of a new documentary about the economic decline of the Sooner State and how this decline has affected public education. The film is called "Brokelahoma," and it         includes the voices and perspectives of many teachers from across our state. Note that there will be a special screening-plus-Q&A of this film on Monday the 23rd at the Circle Cinema here in Tulsa; more details are posted here.

(Note: This show first aired earlier this year.) Our guest is Mallory O'Meara, an author, screenwriter, and film producer who lives and works in Los Angeles. She tells us about her new book, which is a biography of Milicent Patrick -- one of Disney's first female animators and the only woman in history to create one of Hollywood's classic movie monsters: The Creature from the Black Lagoon. As was noted of this volume in a starred review in BookPage: "Fascinating....

Today we welcome Sterlin Harjo back to StudioTulsa. The celebrated locally-based filmmaker has a new movie, which he tells us about. It's a documentary short called "Terlton," and it'll have its world premiere this coming Saturday, the 13th, as part of the 2019 Circle Cinema Film Festival. "Terlton" takes us back to the summer of 1985, when a small town in Oklahoma -- incredibly, and so sadly -- lost a full one-fourth of its population when an explosion happened at a local fireworks factory.

After debuting last year as part of the Circle Cinema's 90th birthday bash, the Circle Cinema Film Festival is back in 2019 with a rich assortment of films as well as various art, music, and cultural experiences. Our guests are Clark Wiens, a founder of the Circle Cinema Foundation, and Chuck Foxen, the film programmer at the Circle. They tell us about many of the films and special guests who come to Tulsa as a part of this gala festival, which happens from the 11th through the 15th.

Our guest is Mallory O'Meara, an author, screenwriter, and film producer who lives and works in Los Angeles. She tells us about her new book, which is a biography of Milicent Patrick -- one of Disney's first female animators and the only woman in history to create one of Hollywood's classic movie monsters: The Creature from the Black Lagoon. As was noted of this volume in a starred review in BookPage: "Fascinating....

Photo by Piper Prolago / The TU Collegian

Our guest is Gary Schyman, an award-winning composer of film, TV, and video game music -- including the "Bioshock" series of video games and the more recent "Torn" virtual reality game. Schyman is currently visiting the TU campus, working with film scoring and computer gaming students. He tells us about how his career began in the television scoring industry, working on classic 1980s shows like "Magnum P.I." and "The A-Team." He also speaks about his far-ranging experiences scoring films and video games, working with various studios and orchestras.

Our guest is Sarah Mondale, director of the newly released and engrossing documentary, "Backpack Full of Cash." As is noted of this film at its website: "Narrated by Matt Damon, this feature-length documentary explores the growing privatization of public schools and the resulting impact on America's most vulnerable children.

Photo by Blake Little; "Bareback Bronc Riding, San Diego, California, 1992."

On this edition of ST, we learn about a photography show at Gilcrease that aims to capture the grit, determination, diversity, community, and "American-ness" of the national gay rodeo circuit; "Blake Little: Photographs from the Gay Rodeo" is on view at the museum through November 25th. The striking black-and-white photographs in this show (more than 40 of them in total) were all taken by Blake Little between 1988 and 1992.

On this edition of our program, we learn about "The Bleeding Edge," a new documentary film that recently started airing on Netflix. This film, directed by Kirby Dick, offers a detailed and unsettling look at the unforeseen consequences of various advanced technological devices that are routinely used by Big Medical today. Our guest is the producer of this film, Amy Herdy, who has worked in film -- specializing in social justice issues -- for more than twenty years.

Photo by John Cohen / Bob Dylan in 1962

On this edition of ST, we speak once again with Michael Chaiken, the curator of the Tulsa-based Bob Dylan Archive, which is currently located at the University of Tulsa's Helmerich Center for American Research at Gilcrease Museum, and which houses some 6,000 items related to Dylan's life and career in music -- nearly six decades of writings, recordings, memorabilia, film, and more. This facility is meant for researchers and scholars; it is not open to the public.

(Please note: This interview originally aired back in February.) Lots of mythology surrounding the Old West, of course, and lots of rich history, too. On this program, we explore both. Our guest is Tom Clavin, the popular historian whose latest book is "Dodge City: Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, and the Wickedest Town in the American West." As was noted of this book by the Houston Press: "Thorough, compelling, and entertaining.... Clavin sprinkles in fascinating tidbits about life and culture in the Old West....

Our guest is Clark Wiens, the president and co-founder of the non-profit Circle Cinema (which is located near the corner of Lewis and Admiral). This much-loved Tulsa landmark -- at once historic, unique, and irreplacable; a cultural lifeline as well as a crucial part of the our city's artistic community -- will soon turn 90 years old. Therefore, as Clark tells us, this special venue will soon host -- from July 7th through the 15th -- the Circle Cinema Film Festival and 90th Birthday Celebration.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, we speak with the Austin-based, Montana-raised filmmaker Alex Smith, who's currently visiting TU in order to screen and answer questions about his feature film, "Walking Out." (The film will be shown tonight, the 13th, at the Lorton Performance Center; the screening is free to the public.) Smith and his twin brother Andrew work together on various film and TV projects, and "Walking Out" is their most recent movie.

On this broadcast of ST, we chat with Laura Skoch, a Visiting Faculty Member with the Theatre Department here at The University of Tulsa. She's directing the new TU Theatre production of George Orwell's "1984," which opens tonight (the 22nd) in Kendall Hall on the TU campus and runs through the 25th. As Skoch relates during our interview, this decidedly multi-media play, like Orwell's classic novel, is mainly about how people seek out both meaning and hope in a world of lies, suppression, fear, and distortion.

Our guest today on StudioTulsa is Pierre Sauvage, an Emmy Award-winning documentary filmmaker who's also a  child survivor of the Holocaust. He'll be speaking here in Tulsa, on Sunday the 12th, at the 79th Anniversary Kristallnacht Commemoration, beginning at 2pm in the Jewish Federation of Tulsa's Sylvan Auditorium.

The 2017 Tulsa American Film Festival, or TAFF, showcasing indie features and shorts from across the United States -- with a focus on local, classic, student, Native American, and Okie-rooted films -- continues here in T-Town at several different venues. Tonight, the 13th, the TAFF will present the Oklahoma Premiere of a new documentary film about the life and work of Wilma Mankiller, who in 1985 was the first woman elected as Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation.

On this installment of StudioTulsa, we speak with the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Glenn Frankel about his new book, "High Noon." It's a detailed history focused on the making of one of Hollywood’s most popular, and most critically acclaimed, Westerns. It's also, as we learn on today's program, a quite deliberate if veiled parable about the then-current Hollywood blacklist.

On this edition of StudioTulsa, an interesting chat with the locally based filmmaker James Payne. His new movie, a feature-length, award-winning documentary called "Far Western," will have its Tulsa debut screening at the Circle Cinema on Thursday the 5th at 7pm.

On this installment of our show, an in-depth discussion with the novelist Tom Perrotta, whose books include "Election" and "Little Children" (both of which were made into well-regarded films). Perrotta has a new novel out, titled "Mrs. Fletcher," and he tells us about it on today's program. As was noted of this book in a front-page appreciation in The New York Times Book Review: "[This book], Perrotta's seventh novel and first since 2011's "The Leftovers," operates and succeeds in ways that will be pleasingly familiar to his admirers.

What can American motion pictures tell us about the American South, and what can the South tell us about the movies? Our guest is Robert Jackson, an Associate Professor of English here at the University of Tulsa.

Our guest on this broadcast of ST is the acclaimed filmmaker Annie O'Neil, who is probably best known for her work on the award-winning documentary, "Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago," which is a detailed profile, directed by Lydia Smith, of six hikers making the difficult, 500-mile Camino De Santiago pilgrimage to the shrine of St. James in Galicia, Spain. After this film came out in 2013, O'Neil was contacted by one Phil Volker, a man living near Seattle with Stage 4 cancer.

Without question, Americans today appreciate good/sturdy design or historic/innovative architecture more than ever before. The Architecture & Design Film Festival, which dates back to 2009, is rooted in this widespread appreciation. It's a festival that usually plays in big cities all over the globe -- NYC, say, or Seoul, South Korea -- but this weekend, from April 20th through the 23rd, the Architecture & Design Film Festival will be screened at the Circle Cinema here in Tulsa.

Pages